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Historic preservation handbookIowa City Historic Preservation Commission Contains guidelines for the historic review of propertfes in historic and conservatfon districts and historic landmarks; an explanatfon of the historic preservatfon process and regulatfons; and informatfon about best practfces for historic property owners. Iowa City Historic Preserv ation Handbook A resource for historic Iowa City Adopted September 7, 2010 Amended July 6, 2021 Goosetown /Horace Mann Conservation District & Jefferson Street Historic District maps added 7/22/2015. Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Table of Contents 1.0 Historic Preservatfon and Conservatfon in Iowa City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1 “Why should a community like Iowa City care about historic preservatfon?”. . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 The Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.3 Districts and Landmarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.4 Classificatfon of Propertfes in Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.5 Historic Designatfon Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.0 Historic Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.1 When is Historic Review Required?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.2 Historic Review Process. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.3 Applicatfon for Historic Review. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.4 Certfficates of No Material Effect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.5 Minor Review, Pre-Approved Items and Certfficates of Appropriateness. . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 Intermediate Review and Certfficates of Appropriateness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.7 Major Review and Certfficates of Appropriateness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.8 Certfficate of Economic Hardship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.9 Appeals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservatfon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.1 Iowa City Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2 Exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 Additfonal Historic Preservatfon Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 Building Code and Zoning Ordinances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.2 Chimneys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 Doors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.4 Energy Efficiency. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.5 Foundatfons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.6 Gutters and Downspouts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.7 Mass and Rooflines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.8 Masonry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.9 Paint and Color. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.10 Porches. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.11 Siding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.12 Site and Landscaping. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.13 Windows. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.14 Wood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.0 Guidelines for Additfons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.1 Expansion of Building Footprint. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5.2 Decks and Ramps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.1 New Primary Structures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.2 New Outbuildings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.0 Guidelines for Demolitfon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.1 Demolitfon of Whole Structures or Significant Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7.2 Preventfon of Demolitfon by Neglect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 1 2 2 4 5 5 6 7 7 7 8 8 9 9 10 10 11 12 13 14 14 16 16 18 20 21 22 24 25 26 28 32 33 36 38 38 42 44 44 48 50 50 50 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.1 Longfellow Neighborhood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.2 College Hill Neighborhood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.3 Woodlawn Historic District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8.4 Northside Neighborhood. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.1 Site Elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9.2 Architectural Elements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitatfon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.0 Title 14: Iowa City Zoning Code. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.1 Chapter 2, Artfcle B – Multf-Family Residentfal Zones. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.2 Chapter 3, Artfcle B – Historic District and Conservatfon District Overlay. . . . . . . . . . . 11.3 Chapter 7, Artfcle A – Boards and Commissions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11.4 Chapter 8, Artfcle E – Historic Preservatfon Commission Approval Procedures. . . . . . 11.5 Chapter 9, Artfcle B – Historic Preservatfon Definitfons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.1 American Foursquare. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.2 Colonial Revival. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.3 Craftsman. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.4 Craftsman Bungalow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.5 Eclectfc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.6 Greek Revival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.7 Italianate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.8 Period Revival Cottages and Houses. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.9 Prairie School. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.10 Queen Anne. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12.11 Vernacular. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.0 Historic Landmarks, Propertfes, and Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.1 Local Historic Landmarks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13.2 Historic and Conservatfon Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts Descriptfon and History. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.1 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.2 College Hill Neighborhood Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.3 Woodlawn Historic District. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14.4 Northside Neighborhood Districts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts (Citywide map) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17.0 College Hill Neighborhood Districts (Maps). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18.0 Woodlawn Historic District (Map).. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Maps). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.0 Appendices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.1 Definitfons. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.2 Architectural Terms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A.3 Historic Preservatfon Documents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 51 53 54 55 56 56 57 61 60 62 62 62 63 63 64 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 76 76 78 79 79 80 81 82 84 86 91 94 95 100 100 102 105 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 1 1.0 Historic Preservation and Conservation in Iowa City “The simple answer is that conserving old buildings and neighborhoods makes a good community better. Iowa City is blessed with a collection of fine, well-maintained older neighborhoods and individual landmarks which are recognized and appreciated by the entire community. Historic preservation has the potential to enhance the quality of life and economic well-being of current and future residents.” Marlys Svendsen, Iowa City Historic Preservation Plan In 2008, the Iowa City City Council adopted the Iowa City Historic Preservation Plan that was prepared by architectural historian Marlys Svendsen. The plan carefully and thoughtiully evaluated Iowa City’s historic buildings and neighborhoods and set forth a plan of actfon for their stewardship. Historic neighborhoods and buildings are protected by the designatfon of historic districts, conservatfon districts and historic landmarks. Designatfon provides for the careful management of these resources by the Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission through the historic review process. The purpose of historic review is to preserve or conserve historic architectural resources by discouraging alteratfons that either destroy the unique characteristfcs of a building or alter the character of historic neighborhoods. The Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission was created by local ordinance in December 1982. Its mission statement as described in the Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Plan is “To identffy, protect, and preserve the community’s historic resources in order to enhance the quality of life and economic well- being of current and future generatfons.” Its members are citfzen volunteers appointed by the City Council. Many of the members reside in historic districts and have expertfse in fields related to historic preservatfon. The Purpose of the Historic Preservation Commission is to: 1.Promote the educatfonal, cultural, economic and general welfare of the public through the protectfon, enhancement and perpetuatfon of historic districts and historic and cultural landmarks located in the city; 2.Safeguard the city’s historic, aesthetfc and cultural heritage by preserving districts, historic landmarks and propertfes of historical, architectural and cultural significance; 3.Stabilize and improve property values by conserving historic propertfes; 4.Foster civic pride in the legacy of beauty and achievements of the past; 5.Protect and enhance the city’s attractfons to tourists and visitors and thereby support and stfmulate business; 6.Strengthen the economy of the city; and 7.Promote the use of districts of historic and cultural significance as sites for the educatfon, pleasure and welfare of the people of the city. The Powers and Duties of the Historic Preservation Commission: 1.The Commission is authorized to conduct studies for the identfficatfon and designatfon of "conservatfon districts", "historic districts" and "historic landmarks". The Commission may proceed at its own initfatfve or upon a petftfon from any person, group or associatfon. 2.The Commission reviews and acts upon all applicatfons for Certfficates of Appropriateness. 3.The Commission shall further the efforts of historic preservatfon in the city by making recommendatfons to the City Council and City commissions and boards on preservatfon issues when appropriate, by encouraging the protectfon and enhancement of structures with historical, architectural or cultural value, and by encouraging persons and organizatfons to become involved in preservatfon actfvitfes. 1.0 Historic Preservation and Conservation in Iowa City 1.1 “Why should a community like Iowa City care about historic preservation?” 1.2 The Iowa City Historic Preservation Commission Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 21.0 Historic Preservation and Conservation in Iowa City Historic and conservatfon districts, and historic landmarks, are designated by ordinance by the Iowa City City Council with recommendatfons from the Historic Preservatfon Commission, the State Historical Society of Iowa, and the Planning and Zoning Commission. Recommendatfons for the historic designatfon of districts and propertfes are also received from professional architectural historians following an intensive survey and evaluatfon of a neighborhood’s historic propertfes and resources. Historic Districts Historic districts are geographically cohesive areas with significant concentratfons of buildings and other resources that possess a high degree of historic integrity. Historic districts are typically first nominated to and listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places, and then designated as local historic districts. Designatfon as a local district provides the Historic Preservatfon Commission with the authority to review changes to propertfes that may affect the historic character of the property and the district. The overall character of a historic district must convey a distfnct sense of tfme and place. Conservation Districts Conservatfon districts are neighborhoods that appear similar to historic districts in character. However, because they have fewer propertfes that retain a high degree of historic integrity or contribute to a distfnct sense of tfme and place within the neighborhood, they do not qualify as historic districts based on State Code. Because they are stfll considered worthy of protectfon, City Council may designate these neighborhoods for historic conservatfon. Iowa City Historic Landmarks Historic landmarks are buildings that are individually significant for their architectural and/or cultural merits. Like historic districts, these propertfes are typically listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places, or are eligible for listfng on the Natfonal Register. 1.3 Districts and Landmarks 1.4 Classification of Properties in Districts Propertfes in conservatfon and historic districts are classified based on their historic and architectural significance and integrity. Because neighborhoods change over tfme, these districts typically have some structures that are not historic or that have been severely altered. Buildings in historic or conservatfon districts may range from outstanding historic landmarks to architecturally incompatfble, modern structures. Depending on the classificatfon of a property, certain exceptfons to the guidelines or financial incentfves may be applicable. To determine the classificatfon of a specific property in a historic or conservatfon district, refer to the Table of Contents to locate the appropriate district map that indicates the property’s classificatfon. To determine if a property has been designated a historic landmark, see sectfon 13.0 Historic Landmarks. Contributing and Noncontributing Properties When districts are evaluated and nominated for preservatfon and conservatfon, individual propertfes are classified as either contributfng or noncontributfng to the historic character of the proposed district. Contributing Properties In historic districts, to be classified as a contributfng property the primary building must (1) have an architectural style and character that is clearly evident and (2) have been constructed during the district’s period of significance and relate to a significant historic context in the neighborhood’s history. The period of significance and the historic context(s) for each district are determined by professional consultants prior to designatfon. Contributfng propertfes in historic districts may be eligible for Federal and State tax incentfves for substantfal rehabilitatfon. Conservatfon districts tend to exhibit a greater variety of building styles from different tfme periods and are less architecturally cohesive, so their historic contexts are more loosely defined. The primary determining factors in classifying a property in a conservatfon district are (1) the historic integrity of the primary (Continued on page 3) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 3 1.0 Historic Preservation and Conservation in Iowa City building and (2) the age of the primary building, which typically must be at least 50 years old at the tfme a district is designated. Noncontributing and Non-historic Properties Propertfes that are not classified as contributfng are classified as noncontributfng. Noncontributfng propertfes have a primary building that has been significantly altered or that is non-historic. Non- historic buildings are buildings constructed after a district’s period of significance or were less than 50 years old at the tfme the district was designated. Refer to Sectfon 14.0 for informatfon on Iowa City’s Historic and Conservatfon Districts. These propertfes are NOT exempt from historic preservatfon regulatfons, but exceptfons to the guidelines are possible. The rehabilitatfon of noncontributfng historic buildings is encouraged. The demolitfon of existfng non-historic buildings and constructfon of new, more architecturally compatfble buildings is allowed. During the process of preparing the survey and evaluatfon for each historic neighborhood and, for historic districts, the Natfonal Register of Historic Places nominatfon, each property is visually inspected and historically researched by a professional architectural historian. The Commission uses this informatfon to determine the classificatfon of each property. However, the Commission may vote to change the classificatfon of a property under the following conditfons: 1.Additfonal informatfon is discovered that documents it has greater cultural significance than originally determined. 2.It is determined that the original research and inspectfon did not conclusively or accurately document the architectural or historic fabric of the property. 3.A property has been substantfally altered since it was originally classified. 4.A property has reached the fifty-year threshold for determining historical significance. Periodic surveys will be conducted to re-evaluate the integrity of all the buildings that have changed and a report will be submitted for Commission consideratfon to reclassify such propertfes. An owner may also submit a letter to the Preservatfon Planner requestfng re-evaluatfon, if he or she feels that their property has been incorrectly classified. The Preservatfon Planner will submit the request, along with a report and recommendatfon, to the Commission for a determinatfon. Landmarks and Key Properties Landmarks are propertfes that are individually significant because of their architectural quality, integrity and historic or cultural significance. Iowa City has over 40 local historic landmarks that are subject to the historic preservatfon regulatfons. Propertfes classified as key are either landmarks or are eligible for designatfon as landmarks. Key propertfes are subject to the same historic preservatfon guidelines as contributfng buildings in historic districts. Key propertfes and landmarks may be eligible for Federal and State tax incentfves for substantfal rehabilitatfon. See sectfon 13.0 Historic Landmarks for a complete list of landmarks. Key propertfes are illustrated on the district maps in sectfons 15.0 through 19.0. For a list of propertfes located outside existfng districts that are eligible for landmark designatfon, contact the Preservatfon Planner. Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4 1.0 Historic Preservation and Conservation in Iowa City 1.5 Historic Designation Process Historic District Or Landmark Conservation District Historic Preservation Plan Goals and objectives Neighborhoods Surveyed and evaluated District and landmark recom- mendations National Register Nomi- nation Preliminary report Architectural and cultur- al research Neighborhood or Com- mission initiation Property classification Reconnaissance survey * Neighborhood meetings (2-3) * Neighborhood meetings (1-2) Letter from State State and Federal ap- proval Rezone to OHD1 or OCD2 Prepare district guidelines & maps (districts only) * Historic Preservation Commission public hearing State recommendation * Planning & Zoning Commission public discussion ** City Council public hearing City Council votes (3) Pass & adopt * Notification of property owners by mail. ** Public notification printed in newspaper 1 Historic Districts and Landmarks are designated by rezoning a property or area to Historic District Overlay (OHD) 2 Conservation Districts are designated by rezoning an area to Conservation District Overly (OCD) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 5 2.0 Historic Review The historic preservatfon guidelines contained in this handbook will be used by the Historic Preservatfon Commission to determine if a proposed change to a landmark or property in a district is compatfble with the historic character of the district and property. The intent of the historic review process is: To ensure that changes to landmarks and propertfes in districts do not substantfally alter or destroy the defining architectural character of the building, site or neighborhood. To provide property owners, contractors and consultants with technical assistance and alternatfves to ensure that proposed projects conform with the historic preservatfon guidelines. 2.0 Historic Review 2.1 When is Historic Review Required? Historic review by the Commission is required for all constructfon projects that require a regulated permit, and change the exterior features of any property in a historic or conservatfon district, or any historic landmark. The proposed project must be approved by the Preservatfon Planner, Preservatfon Planner and Chair of the Historic Preservatfon Commission, or the full Commission according to the level of review required before a building permit will be issued by Housing and Inspectfon Services. Examples of common projects that require a regulated permit and historic review are: NOTE: The applicatfon of siding, window replacement, and demolitfon of portfons of a building require a building permit for propertfes within districts and landmarks. For propertfes that are not within a historic or conservatfon district, and that have not been designated landmarks, these actfons do not require a permit. Examples of common projects that may not require a regulated permit and need not be reviewed by the Commission are: A complete list of work exempt from permit can be found in Amendments to: International Residential Code, International Building Code, which is available through Housing and Inspectfon Services. Applicatfon or reapplicatfon of new siding. Constructfon of decks and ramps. Replacement or additfon of windows. (including sash replacement). Adding skylights. Demolitfon of a garage or other outbuilding. Constructfon of new dormers. Porch constructfon, reconstructfon or replacement. Removal of porches, trim, brackets, chimneys, dormers or other defining architectural features. Constructfon of additfons. Constructfon of a new garage. Reapplicatfon of roof shingles on commercial and multf-family buildings. Exterior paintfng. Window repair (excluding sash replacement). Constructfon of fences that are less than 6 feet high (4 feet high in front yard). Installatfon of new storm windows. Constructfon of accessory structures, such as garden sheds, less than 144 square feet in area. Replacement of external gutters and downspouts. Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 6 2.0 Historic Review 2.2 Historic Review Process Pre-application meeting Submit application Planner evaluation Repair – No Material Effect Major Review Intermediate Review Minor Review Applicant notified of meeting by mail Review by Historic Preservation Commission Certificate of Appropriateness Certificate of No Material Effect Review by Planner OR Resolution of Denial Copy transmitted to: Owner & Contractor Building Inspection (HIS) City Clerk Appeal Review by Commission Chair and Planner Review by Commission Chair and Planner The Commission strongly recommends meeting with the Preservation Planner prior to submitting an application. An application may be obtained from the Planning Department or on the City’s website at www.icgov.org/HistoricPreservation. The Preservation Planner will determine the type of Historic Review required. Examples of projects covered by review types can be found in sections 2.5-2.7 of the Handbook. Applications for landmark properties or properties within Historic Districts may be appealed to City Council. Applications for properties within Conservation Districts may be appealed to the Board of Adjustment. May be forwarded for more intensive review. Continue Permitting Process Enforced by Housing & Inspection Services with Final approval by Historic Preservation Planner if necessary Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 7 2.0 Historic Review The minor review process is utflized for the most routfne project types that have in the past garnered Commission consensus. In order to expedite the historic review process, the Preservatfon Planner will review these applicatfons independently to verify that proposals comply fully with the Guidelines, require no exceptfons to the guidelines, contain no problematfc elements, and involve only materials, processes, or work which have been pre-approved by the full Commission. Contact the Preservatfon Planner for a list of projects that have been pre-approved. A Certfficate of Appropriateness will be issued to the owner and/or contractor for projects that satfsfy the minor review requirements, and will be filed with Housing and Inspectfon Services and the City Clerk. If the project does not meet the requirements for a Certfficate of Appropriateness under minor review, the applicant will be advised on correctfve measures in order to meet the minor review requirements, or the applicatfon will be forwarded to undergo the intermediate or full review. The applicant may also request the applicatfon be forwarded to the full Commission for review. Pre-Approved Items The alterations listed below qualify for a minor review. These alterations are ones that meet the guidelines and have been approved by the Commission to be applicable to most structures in historic and conservation districts. Staff approval may be given for: * Railings * Window replacement of certain types * Deck constructfon * Ramps * Garages/ Out-buildings * Radon Mitfgatfon Systems The list of “pre-approved” items may expand as new products are introduced into the market and new products are brought before the Commission. Please contact the Preservatfon Planner at 356-5243 to discuss your project. An applicatfon for historic review must be submitted to the Preservatfon Planner at City Hall, 410 E Washington St, Iowa City. The applicatfon should include dimensioned drawings, sketches, photographs, text, product samples, or other exhibits that accurately portray the work to be done. The Commission or Preservatfon Planner may request additfonal informatfon if the applicatfon cannot be fairly evaluated as submitted. A pre-applicatfon conference with the Preservatfon Planner is recommended to help ensure that a proposed project will comply with the guidelines. Applicatfon forms may be obtained from the Planning and Community Development Department, Housing and Inspectfon Services, or on the web at www.icgov.org/HistoricPreservatfon. Once the applicatfon is received, the Preservatfon Planner will make a preliminary determinatfon regarding the appropriate level of review. The various levels of review – detailed below – ensure expeditfous handling of applicatfons and the use of the full Commission’s skills and expertfse when necessary. The criteria for determining the type of review include the effect on the appearance of the significant architectural features, materials and processes proposed, compliance with Guidelines, the scope and type of the project, and the significance of the property the proposed project involves, among other consideratfons. The Preservatfon Planner and the Commission Chair or the Chair’s designee may issue a Certfficate of No Material Effect if the Preservatfon Planner’s preliminary review reveals the proposed work will not alter the appearance of significant architectural features and review by the full Commission is not required. The Certfficate of No Material Effect will be issued to the owner and/or contractor, and will be filed with Housing and Inspectfon Services and the City Clerk. Generally, projects consistfng only of repair work or replacement of existfng damaged or deteriorated features with like materials will be issued Certfficates of No Material Effect. 2.4 Certificates of No Material Effect 2.3 Application for Historic Review 2.5 Minor Review, Pre-Approved Items and Certificates of Appropriateness Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 8 2.0 Historic Review An intermediate review is required for all applicatfons except those involving landmark propertfes and contributfng propertfes in historic districts (which require a major review), and projects which do not qualify for a Certfficate of No Material Effect or a minor review (because they will alter the exterior appearance of the structure, or because the project requires the use of materials or processes which have not been pre-approved). The intermediate review is conducted by the Preservatfon Planner and the Commission Chair or the Chair’s designee. Applicatfons which comply fully with the Guidelines, require no exceptfons to the Guidelines, and contain no problematfc elements will be issued a Certfficate of Appropriateness, and will be filed with Housing and Inspectfon Services and the City Clerk. Applicants are encouraged to contfnue working with the Preservatfon Planner untfl areas of the applicatfon identffied as problematfc are sufficiently altered. The applicant may also request the applicatfon be forwarded to the full Commission for review. The Preservatfon Planner and/or the Commission Chair or Chair’s designee may also recommend projects undergo full review if an abbreviated review is seen as inappropriate given the scope and type of project proposed. Examples of types of projects that qualify for Intermediate Review: Alteratfons: All alteratfons except changes in window type, pattern or dimension, relocatfons of door openings and additfon of dormers. See sectfon 4.0 Guidelines for Alterations for a listfng of project types that qualify as alteratfons. Additfons: Decks located behind the primary structure. New constructfon: New outbuildings, provided they are located behind the rear plane of an existfng primary structure. Demolitfon: Non-historic outbuildings and non-historic features of a primary building. Minor revisions to a previously approved Certfficate of Appropriateness may also be eligible for intermediate review by Preservatfon Planner and Chair. 2.6 Intermediate Review and Certificates of Appropriateness A major review is required for applicatfons involving landmark propertfes and contributfng propertfes in historic districts provided the proposed project does not qualify for a Certfficate of No Material Effect or a minor review. These applicatfons will be reviewed by the Preservatfon Planner or the Historic Review Subcommittee, which, if actfve, is composed of three members of the Historic Preservatfon Commission. The Preservatfon Planner or the Subcommittee will make recommendatfons to the Historic Preservatfon Commission and a quorum of the Commission will consider the applicatfon at its next regularly scheduled meetfng. If a majority of the Commission votes to approve the applicatfon, a Certfficate of Appropriateness will be issued to the owner and/or contractor, and will be filed with Housing and Inspectfon Services and the City Clerk. Similarly, if the applicatfon is denied, a Resolutfon of Denial will be issued. 2.7 Major Review and Certificates of Appropriateness Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 9 2.0 Historic Review After receiving written notfficatfon from the Commission of the Resolutfon of Denial, the owner of record may apply for a Certfficate of Economic Hardship, if he or she believes the Commission’s decision would result in economic hardship to the extent that the property in questfon cannot yield a reasonable return. To apply for a Certfficate of Economic Hardship, a written letter statfng case, and all supportfng materials, must be filed with the Department of Planning and Community Development. A public hearing will be held by the Commission within sixty days of the receipt of the applicatfon and all supportfng materials, which will result in the approval or denial of the Certfficate of Economic Hardship. The Commission will issue a written decision setting forth the factual basis for the decision. If the Commission finds that unreasonable economic hardship exists, a Certfficate of Economic Hardship will be issued, specifying the authorized material changes. The review and approval procedures for a Certfficate of Economic Hardship are set forth in Artfcle 14-8E of the Iowa City Zoning Code, Historic Preservatfon Commission Approval Procedures. The applicant bears the burden of proof and must support each of the approval criteria by a preponderance of the evidence. A.The property in questfon cannot yield a reasonable return if required to comply with the requirements and standards specified in this Artfcle. It is not sufficient to show that the potentfal return will be reduced as a result of these regulatfons, but rather it must be demonstrated that the resultfng reductfon would be near confiscatfon B.The owner’s situatfon is unique or peculiar to the property in questfon, and the situatfon is not shared with other landowners in the area nor due to general conditfons in the neighborhood C.The hardship is not of the property owner’s or applicant’s own making. 2.9 Appeals 2.8 Certificate of Economic Hardship Applicants may appeal decisions of the Commission to the City Council for landmarks and propertfes in historic districts, and to the Board of Adjustment for propertfes in conservatfon districts. The Certfficate of Appropriateness, or the Resolutfon of Denial, which states the reason for the decision, will be filed with the City Clerk within five days of the decision. The applicant has 10 business days from the tfme the Resolutfon of Denial or Certfficate of Appropriateness is filed with the Clerk to file a letter with the City Clerk requestfng an appeal. The City Council or Board of Adjustment will determine if the decision of the Historic Preservatfon Commission was arbitrary or capricious, but neither the Council nor the Board has the authority to override a decision by the Commission if it is determined that it was not arbitrary or capricious. 103.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservatfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook These guidelines were written by the Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission to address specifically the historic preservatfon issues in Iowa City and to provide more detailed guidance to property owners and builders as they design their constructfon projects. The guidelines are based on The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation, which can be found in sectfon 10.0. The Iowa City Guidelines are the guidelines that will be used to evaluate most projects. If there are issues that are not addressed in these guidelines, then the Historic Preservatfon Commission will use The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and the Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings, which are guidelines for interpretfng the standards. Typically, there are four types of projects that modify the exterior of landmarks or propertfes within districts. The Iowa City Guidelines are divided into four sectfons that correspond to these project types. These are: 4.0 Guidelines for Alterations 5.0 Guidelines for Additions 6.0 Guidelines for New Construction 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition Alterations Alteratfons are modificatfons to a site or to the exterior of a building that do not increase the size of the building’s footprint. Most maintenance and remodeling projects such as siding repair, reconstructfon or repair of historic porches, adding dormers to convert an attic space to a living space, and replacing doors and windows are considered alteratfons. These projects will be evaluated using 4.0 Guidelines for Alterations. Additions Constructfon that results in a larger building footprint, increases the building’s overall height, or adds an attached structure to a building is considered an additfon. Additfons include constructfon of a new room, porch, or deck. These projects will be evaluated using 5.0 Guidelines for Additions as well as 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Setback Additions A setback additfon is constructed behind an existfng building, opposite the street facade, and is set back eight inches or more from the side walls. The roof of a setback additfon can be no higher than the roof of the existfng building. This results in an additfon that is narrower and no taller than the building to which it is attached, and is therefore not highly visible from the street. Setback additfons are encouraged because they have less impact on a historic building and district. Therefore, the Commission may allow some flexibility when reviewing such additfons. Setback additfons will be evaluated using 5.0 Guidelines for Additions as well as 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. New Construction Although most lots in conservatfon and historic districts are developed, there may be occasions where a new primary building or outbuilding is constructed. Outbuildings include garages, garden sheds, gazebos and other accessory structures that require a building permit. Under most circumstances, non-historic buildings and structures may be demolished and the lot redeveloped. However, the new building and the demolitfon must be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission before any building or demolitfon (Continued on page 11) 3.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservation 3.1 Iowa City Guidelines The purpose of the historic preservatfon guidelines is to: Provide comprehensive design guidelines for constructfon projects to landmarks and propertfes within each district. Provide property owners with design criteria that will be the basis for approving or denying Certfficates of Appropriateness. Identffy the defining characteristfcs of individual historic or conservatfon district. The Preservatfon Planner is available to answer any questfons, assist an owner or contractor with their project, and provide additfonal preservatfon informatfon. 11 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 3.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservatfon In writfng the historic preservatfon guidelines, the Historic Preservatfon Commission has made every effort to clarify the criteria for historic review. However, not every situatfon can be antfcipated. Situatfons requiring exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines will be considered by the full Commission under major review unless the project conforms to the documented exceptfons listed in the guidelines, in which case the project may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. The Commission is charged with interpretfng and applying the guidelines in a fair and consistent manner, but is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. The Commission may consider grantfng the following types of exceptfons: Documented Exceptions A documented exceptfon exists where the Commission has encountered and antfcipated acceptable alternatfve methods and materials to the guidelines. When these methods and materials have found consensus with the Commission, they have been incorporated into the guidelines. The nature of these exceptfons is to acknowledge materials or project types that are appropriate only in limited circumstances, the partfcular circumstances of which have been clearly defined and explicitly listed at the end of each applicable sectfon of the guidelines. Non-Historic Structures A number of the documented exceptfons pertain to non-historic structures. Because the historic preservatfon guidelines are intended primarily to protect the character and integrity of historic propertfes and districts, exceptfons have been crafted to accommodate non-historic structures within the districts. While the great majority of propertfes located in historic and conservatfon districts are historic propertfes, and were constructed in or before 1945, the Historic Preservatfon Commission may grant exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines for the relatfvely small number of propertfes that are classified as non-historic propertfes and were constructed after the period of significance of a district. Specific criteria exist for evaluatfng non-historic structures. In order to qualify for an exceptfon, the proposed change to the exterior of a non-historic property must comply with the following criteria: 1.The project will not further detract from the historic character of the district. 2.The project will not create a false historic character. 3.Alteratfons and new additfons will be compatfble with the style and character of the non-historic structure. New Constructfons will be compatfble with the style and character of the district. Uncommon Situations (Continued on page 12) permits are issued. These projects will be evaluated using 6.0 Guidelines for New Construction, 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines and if applicable 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition. Demolition Demolitfon involves the complete removal of a building or a portfon of a building. Removal of dormers, decoratfve trim, porches, balusters, chimneys and other significant features requires a building permit for demolitfon, and therefore historic review. Demolitfon projects will be evaluated using 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition and 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. If a demolitfon permit is sought in order to erect a new structure, the new building and the demolitfon must be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission before any building or demolitfon permits are issued. These projects will be evaluated using 6.0 Guidelines for New Construction, 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition, and 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. 3.2 Exceptions to the Iowa City Guidelines 123.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservatfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 3.3 Additional Historic Preservation Guidelines During the course of historic review, it may be revealed that elements of the applicatfon warrant special consideratfon. When this occurs, alternatfve design solutfons to the Iowa City Guidelines or the Neighborhood District Guidelines may be considered by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. The intent in considering alternatfve designs is to allow architectural flexibility in exceptfonal circumstances such as non- compliant structures, irregular lots, and projects which satfsfy the intent of the guidelines as interpreted by the Commission. The Commission may find guidance in sectfon 3.3 Additional Historic Preservation Guidelines. Alternatfvely, the Commission may advise the applicant regarding appropriate solutfons or accept the applicants’ proposal with or without amendments. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. Guidelines Silent/Unclear Because the guidelines were written by the Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission to address historic preservatfon issues in Iowa City, certain topics may not be covered extensively or at all within the guidelines. Historic preservatfon practfces may evolve. New technologies, materials and practfces which contribute to the preservatfon of historic propertfes may be introduced and require individual treatment. To decide on applicatfons involving issues not covered sufficiently within the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in 3.3 Additional Historic Preservation Guidelines. When ruling on an applicatfon utflizing criteria other than those found within the guidelines, the Commission will identffy the criteria and ratfonale for the record. The appropriateness of use for any new products or materials will also be clearly stated during historic review. The guidelines leave to the discretfon of the Commission the partfcular calculus used to determine the appropriateness of various projects. These consideratfons are largely determined by the historical integrity of the structure, the various elements which would be impacted, the scope of work, the materials used, etc., which vary from project to project. Neighborhood District Guidelines The size and locatfon of a primary building on a site are some of the defining characteristfcs of historic and conservatfon districts. The size of buildings, lots and yards, as well as the architectural character of the buildings, varies by district. Sectfon 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines deals specifically with site, scale, structure locatfon, and architectural style for propertfes within individual historic or conservatfon districts. The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and the Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings are natfonal standards for historic preservatfon. The Secretary of the Interior defines rehabilita- tfon as “the process of returning a property to a state of utflity, through repair or alteratfon, which makes possible an efficient contemporary use while preserving those portfons and features of the property which are significant to its historic, architectural, and cultural value.” The goals of the Standards can be summa- rized as follows: 1.Identffy and preserve those materials and features that are important in defining the building’s historic character. 2.Undertake routfne maintenance on historic materials and features. Routfne maintenance generally in- volves the least amount of work needed to preserve the materials and features of the building. 3.Repair damaged or deteriorated historic materials and features. 4.Replace severely damaged or deteriorated historic materials and features in kind. The Iowa City Guidelines are based on the Standards, but they provide more specific guidance. Occasional- ly, alteratfons are proposed to propertfes that were not antfcipated in the Iowa City Guidelines. When this occurs, the Historic Preservatfon Commission will refer to the Standards when deciding on a Certfficate of Appropriateness. The Standards are located in sectfon 10.0. Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings (Continued on page 13) 13 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 3.0 About the Guidelines for Historic Preservatfon The requirements of the building code and the zoning ordinance must be met in additfon to the requirements of the Iowa City Guidelines. For certain requirements such as mass, scale, size, site consideratfons, and setbacks from the street, the Iowa City Guidelines may be more stringent than the building code or the zoning ordinance. The Historic Preservatfon Commission does NOT review projects for compliance with the building code or zoning ordinance. Please consult with Housing and Inspectfon Services to ensure the project complies with these regulatfons. Sectfons of the Zoning Code that refer to historic preservatfon are detailed in Sectfon 11.0 Title 14: Iowa City Zoning Code. 3.4 Building Code and Zoning Ordinances These guidelines are based on Site Development Standards in the Central Planning District of the Iowa City Zoning Code and apply to the constructfon of buildings with three or more dwelling units. Typically, a new multf-family building would be evaluated by the Staff Design Review Committee. However, if it is located within a historic or conservatfon district, the Historic Preservatfon Commission is responsible for design review and has adapted the original guidelines to be more applicable to districts. Within dis- tricts, more weight is given to the architectural style of the proposed building and its compatfbility with other historic structures. The Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings are located in sectfon 9.0. 144.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Balustrades (guardrails) and handrails serve as both decoratfve and functfonal elements on porches, balconies, and steps. For historic propertfes, the design should be consistent with the architectural style, but not at the expense of safety. 4.0 Guidelines for Alterations Most maintenance and remodeling projects such as siding repair, porch reconstructfon or repair, and changes to the doors and windows are considered alteratfons. Alteratfons to both contributfng and noncontributfng propertfes, as well as landmarks, should be done in a manner that is appropriate to the style and age of the building, as well as its neighborhood context. The historic character and integrity of older buildings should be maintained by repairing historic components to the extent feasible and using traditfonal materials and techniques. Recommended: Historic Balustrades and Handrails Repairing historic balustrades and railings. Replacing badly deteriorated components with ones that match the historic components in design and material. New Balustrades and Handrails Constructfng or replacing missing balustrades by using historic photographs or by choosing a style that is consistent with the architectural style of the building. Installing turned balusters in balustrades that have an actual diameter of 2 inches or greater, or square spindles that are 1-1/2 inches or greater in width. Installing top and foot rails that are at least 2 inches in thickness. On buildings where a spindled balustrade would be most consistent with the architectural style, spacing spindles so that the balustrade is at least 40% solid. Spindles must be spaced so that no gap between the spindles exceeds 4 inches as required by the building code. Providing handrails on porch steps as required by the building code. Handrails should match the historic balustrade height on the porch unless otherwise specified by the building code. The handrail must have a contfnuous member that can be easily gripped. The handrail should either match the porch balustrade or be made of round steel pipe. Providing balustrades on the porch as required by the building code. When the porch floor is more than 30 inches above grade, the balustrade must be 42 inches high except for single-family and duplex structures where it may be as low as 36 inches. Sloping the top and foot rails slightly to allow water to be shed from these surfaces and help prevent deterioratfon of these members. Disallowed: Historic Balustrades and Handrails Removing historic balustrades or railings. (Continued on page 15) Appropriate Balustrade for most Italianate and Queen Anne structures and for some Period Revival, Vernacular, and Eclectic structures Appropriate Balustrade for most Craftsman, Craftsman Bungalow, American Foursquare, and Prairie School structures 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails 15 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Appropriate Balustrade for most structures of simple ornamentation Inappropriate Balustrade for any structure in a Historic or Conservation District or any Landmark Covering the historic balustrades or railings with materials such as siding. New Balustrades and Handrails Using unpainted treated wood for elements that would have been painted in the historic applicatfon. exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Noncontributfng Propertfes in Historic Districts All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Using wrought iron elements unless they were part of the historic design. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of New Balustrades and Handrails On buildings where a spindled balustrade would be most consistent with the architectural style, spacing spindles so that the balustrade is at least 30% solid. On buildings where turned spindles would be most consistent with the architectural style, installing square spindles. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in All Districts New Balustrades and Handrails Alternatfve baluster and handrail designs may be considered. Sloping top and foot rails allow water to shed and help prevent deterioration 164.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Fireplace chimneys are often a defining architectural feature of historic houses. Chimneys may have decoratfve brickwork and often are a distfnguishing feature of the roof profile. Therefore, historic chimneys should be preserved. The original size and shape of door openings should be maintained. Many historic entrance doors are of panel-type constructfon or solid frames with glass lights in the upper part of the door. Historic storm doors are often wood doors with removable sashes and screens. These historic door styles should be used when it is necessary to replace original doors. Historic garage doors often possess distfnctfve design features and should be retained if possible. 4.2 Chimneys 4.3 Doors Recommended: Historic Chimneys Adding a flue liner to historic chimneys for safety reasons. Keeping flue caps as inconspicuous as possible. Following the recommendatfons for masonry repair in sectfon 4.8 Masonry. Repairing and capping unused historic chimneys in a manner that prevents vermin from entering the chimney, but allows air circulatfon. New Chimneys Using masonry to construct full-height exterior fireplace chimneys in a manner that is consistent with the architectural style of the building. Boxing and finishing new chimney pipes that penetrate the roof with thin brick veneer or stucco. Disallowed: Historic Chimneys Removing prominent chimneys that are important to the historic architectural character of the building. Plastering over masonry chimneys in place of proper repair. Pointfng with mortar that is too hard for historic, soft brick. Using synthetfc sealants, adhesives and/or wraps to repair masonry chimneys. Exception For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Recommended: Garage Doors Retaining and repairing historic garage doors where practfcal. Installing new garage doors that resemble the styles of historic ones, or installing new garage doors which are simple in design. Adding trim to garage door openings that matches that of other doors and windows in the garage. Installing two single-car doors instead of a single door. Historic Doors Repairing historic doors rather than replacing them. Replacing badly deteriorated doors with new or salvaged doors that are similar in size, material, style, and appearance. New Doors Installing a wood screen door that accepts sashes with glass or screen. Adding new door openings that are trimmed to match other doors and windows in the building. Substftutfng a material in place of wood for doors and screen doors only if the substftute material retains the style and appearance of the historic doors and screen doors. The substftute material must be durable, accept paint, and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. Disallowed: New Doors (Continued on page 17) 17 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons These traditionally styled doors are appropriate replacements for many historic homes. These modern style doors are generally poor choices for historic homes, particularly on the fronts of the house. Installing flush entrance doors or other modern door styles. Installing sliding patfo doors if they were not original to the building or consistent with the architectural style. Installing natural aluminum storm doors. Blocking down door openings to accommodate standard door sizes. Exception All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Garage Doors Allowing one double door instead of two single-doors. On a case-by-case basis, the Commission may allow one double garage door for garages not highly visible from the street or which mimic the appearance of two single-doors. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in Historic Districts All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts New Doors Sliding patfo doors or other modern-style doors may be installed on the rear of a primary building provided that the openings are trimmed to match the existfng doors and/or windows. In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Noncontributfng and Non-Historic Propertfes in Historic Districts 18 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.4 Energy Efficiency Use light paint colors for your house’s exterior. Lighter colors reflect heat Start with an energy audit. Audits can help pinpoint problem areas and measure energy savings. In a historic house, it is important to hire a professional who’s well acquainted with the idiosyncrasies of older homes. Your local energy company may also conduct complimentary energy audits. The audit should be done in the late fall or winter and may include a Blower Door Test or an infrared camera evaluatfon. During a Blower Door test your auditor will mount a fan on an exterior door frame to pull air out of the house and determine how airtfght the home really is. Make sure fireplace dampers, dryer vents, and bathroom fans are open only during use. An open damper can let as much as eight percent of the heat in your Decorate for cold-weather efficiency. Use lined draperies, working shutters, and insulated window shades to significantly cut heat loss. Check your heating system. Have your furnace serviced for maximum efficiency. Bleed radiators and clean forced-air registers to ensure proper operatfon. Change furnace filters monthly or as recommended by the Add storm windows. Storm windows improve energy efficiency and personal comfort for a fractfon of the Restore porches and awnings. Porches, awnings, and shutters were intended for shade and insulatfon. The restoratfon of porches requires historic review. Often the solutfon to energy leaks in an older home are simpler than imagined. A misconceptfon that some people have about Historic Preservatfon is that it is counter to the growing desire for increased energy efficiency and green building practfces. However, there are many green practfces that are appropriate or that are inherent in historic buildings. Many of the suggestfons listed below do not require historic review, but the small steps outlined can make a big difference in cutting energy loss in an older home. The Commission also encourages new innovatfons and ideas be brought to their attentfon for discussion and research as technologies change. 19 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Keep doors airtight by weather stripping, caulking, Insulate ductwork and hot water pipes travelling through cool spaces. Caulk holes around mail chutes, cable television and utflity entrances, and outdoor faucets. Keep original windows intact. Older windows perform extremely well when properly maintained. Don’t replace — repair! Seal gaps with caulk, apply new glazing compound, replace broken panes, repair loose wood parts, and install weather stripping. You’ll reduce landfill waste and the demand for vinyl, a non- biodegradable material that gives off toxic byproducts when made. Insulate the attic, basement, and crawl space. About 20% of energy costs come from heat loss in those areas. Inadequate insulatfon results in heat loss, and forces your furnace to work overtfme. Make certain the attic hatch is as well insulated as the attic Reuse old materials, such as brick, stone, glass, and slate when making home improvements. This prevents these materials from ending up in the landfill and does not require the resources to harvest or produce new materials. Make a visit to the Salvage Barn at the Iowa City Landfill to find reusable materials of every sort. Plant trees and other landscaping. Evergreen trees on the north and west sides of your house can block winter winds, and leafy trees on the south and west provide shade from the summer sun. It may be possible to use old photos to match the historic In summer, open the windows and use fans and dehumidifiers, which consume less energy than air- conditfoning. Many old houses were designed with good cross- ventflatfon; take advantage of your Install a programmable thermostat to keep your house warm when you are home, and 20 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Noncontributfng Propertfes in Historic Districts All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Foundatfons provide a base for a building and make a transitfon from the walls above ground to the walls or supports below ground. The amount of exposed foundatfon varies with historic structures, but is typically 12 to 30 inches. On brick or stone structures the foundatfon material may be different in color and texture than the wall material, and the two are often separated by a belt course of yet another material or pattern. On many occasions correctfng all sources of moisture and other circumstances that may cause damage to the foundatfon wall and footfngs is necessary prior to the repairs. Maintaining a slope away from the foundatfon to prevent standing water or drainage toward the foundatfon is also essentfal for the long-term stability. 4.5 Foundations Recommended: Historic Foundatfons Correctfng all sources of moisture and other circumstances that may cause damage to the foundatfon wall and footfngs.  Repairing historic foundatfons rather than replacing them.  Removing all non-historic materials and repairing or replacing, if necessary, foundatfons with materials that appear similar to the existfng materials in size, color, texture, compositfon, and joint profile.  Repairing stucco with a mixture that matches the existfng in texture, color, and compositfon.  Retaining the size, shape and locatfon of historic door openings, window openings, and storm cellar entrances in the foundatfon. If new window wells are required, the materials used must appear similar to the existfng foundatfon material. New Foundatfons Using a smooth faced concrete foundatfon for new primary buildings and outbuildings Disallowed: Historic Foundatfons Covering exposed brick, stone, and textured concrete block foundatfons with a cement plaster or stucco. Raising the adjacent grade at the foundatfon to cover what was historically exposed. Paintfng masonry or concrete foundatfons that were originally unpainted. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa New Foundatfons The Commission may allow use of concrete or rock-face concrete block for replacement foundatfon walls and piers in place of masonry units that appear similar to the existfng. 21 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Original built-in gutters are important design features of some historic buildings. Removing these requires a building permit and must be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. A building permit and Certfficate of Appropriateness are not required for replacing external gutters. 4.6 Gutters and Downspouts Recommended: New Downspouts Installing metal downspouts placed vertfcally near the corners. They should be painted to match the background wall or trim color. Original Built-In Gutters Repairing original built-in gutters. EPDM rubber sheetfng is an economical replacement material for the original tfn flashing. Covering original built-in gutters and applying exterior gutters only if the roof slope at the gutter is not altered. This can be accomplished with horizontal blocking and flashing above the old gutter. Disallowed: Roof Pitch Altering the roof pitch when covering historic built-in gutters. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to All Propertfes Original Built-In Gutters Removal of original built-in gutters unable to be repaired. On a case-by-case basis, the Commission may consider allowing removal of original built-in gutters if documentatfon is provided to establish evidence of need. This may include damage to the roof itself or inability to repair built-in gutters to proper working conditfon. Roof Pitch Modified roofline, built-in gutters covered/removed, a slight slope has been added to allow for drainage. A slight modification of the roof pitch at the built-in gutter is allowed to accommodate drainage. Original Roofline with the built-in gutters. Simply covering the built-in gutters does not allow for adequate roof drainage. Modified roofline, built-in gutters have been removed and the roofline straightened. This alters the character defining flared roof edge and lowers the cornice of the building. Dramatically altering the roof pitch at the built-in gutter is not allowed.  Minor changes to the roof pitch to address drainage concerns. On a case-by -case basis, the Commission may consider allowing minor changes to the roof pitch if documentatfon is provided to establish evidence of need. Work should be done to ensure other significant architectural features such as trim and brackets are not altered. 224.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Mass and roof pitch are defining characteristfcs of historic architectural styles. Most of the roofs in historic neighborhoods were originally sawn cedar shingles, although standing seam metal was sometfmes applied. The texture of the wood shingles on the steep-pitched roofs was a prominent feature of historic neighborhoods during the 19th and early 20th centuries. A building permit is not required for simply replacing shingles and historic review is not required. 4.7 Mass and Rooflines Recommended: Materials Preserving historic trim such as crown molding, skirt and frieze boards, and decoratfve metal. Consider unoriginal materials that may have achieved significance, such as metal roofs. Maintaining metal roofs rather than replacing. Paintfng metal roofs dark colors, usually dull red or green, or a natural metallic silver color. Replacing a special historic shingle with one of a similar style when the old shingles need replacing. If quality replacement items cannot be obtained, metal roofs should be replaced with a high-quality wood shingle or with asphalt shingles. Using asphalt shingles that resemble the texture and color of weathered wood shingles for roofs that had wood shingles historically. Using metal framed skylights where allowed. New Dormers Designing new dormers to be of a size, scale and proportfon that is consistent with the architectural style. Designing new dormers such that the face of the dormer is primarily composed of window area. Adding dormers to an existfng roof in a manner that does not significantly alter the character of the historic building. Adding dormers that are in proportfon to the roof’s overall size. The width of the dormers in proportfon to the roof on which they are located should be consistent with the architectural style. Adding dormers that are no closer than 3 feet to an existfng gable end or hip. The intent is to avoid significantly altering the original roof lines. Constructfng gabled and hipped dormers that have roof pitches similar to the pitch of the main roof. Original Roofline and Mass Preserving the original roof pitches and spans. Preserving the original walls and vertfcal corners that define the massing of a historic building. Disallowed: New Dormers Adding dormers that are wider than ones commonly found in the neighborhood or on buildings of a similar architectural style. Adding dormers that extend above the existfng peak of the roof. Original Roofline and Mass Substantfally altering the roof pitch of a historic building on one or both sides of the roof to gain headroom below the rafters. Not Recommended: Mechanical Devices Installing antennas, vents, solar collectors, skylights, satellite dishes, or other mechanical devices on prominent street elevations. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa (Continued on page 23) 23 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to All propertfes Replacement of metal roofs. On a case-by-case basis, the Commission may consider allowing replacement of metal roofs with an approved alternatfve material if documentatfon is provided to establish evidence of need and of efforts to repair existfng damage. Roof Pitch Minor changes to the roof pitch to address drainage concerns. On a case-by-case basis, the Commission may consider allowing minor changes to the roof pitch if documentatfon is provided to establish evidence of need. Work should be done to ensure other significant architectural features such as trim and brackets are not altered. Hipped roof Gambrel roof Mansard roof Flat roof Shed roof Gable roof Types of rooflines commonly found in Iowa City Commercial flat roof 24 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Masonry is designed to resist weathering without paint or any other protectfve coatfng while retaining an appealing appearance. As such, it is a relatfvely maintenance-free material. When there is deterioratfon of masonry, the single most important step is to locate and repair the cause of the problem before going to the expense and trouble of repairing the masonry. When repairing masonry, four important propertfes should be considered: color, texture, dimension, and hardness of the masonry units. 4.8 Masonry Recommended: Historic Masonry Removing all vines. Vines cause the masonry to retain moisture. Their root-like holdfasts can cause damage to mortar joints. Removing deteriorated mortar by hand. Raking the joints with hand tools is less likely to damage the masonry. The Historic Preservatfon Commission may, at its discretfon, allow for the use of electric grinders by a qualified professional to remove mortar. Replacing deteriorated masonry units with ones that appear similar to the existfng masonry units in color, texture and size, and that have an appropriate hardness. Using mortar that is similar in hardness to the original mortar. A recommended mix for historic masonry contains 1 part white Portland cement, 3 parts lime, and 9 parts sand. If necessary, dye should be added to the new mortar to match the color of the original mortar. This mix is suitable for both laying and pointfng masonry walls. Making mortar joints that match the dimensions of the original joints. Historic mortar joints are often narrower than those commonly used today. Cleaning new mortar smears from the masonry face with a mild acid designed for that purpose. Cleaning historic masonry using a natural bristle brush and mild, water-based detergent. Sometfmes a gentle chemical method may be appropriate, but only if it does not damage the masonry. Disallowed: Historic Masonry Sandblastfng, water blastfng, or any other abrasive cleaning method. Blastfng can cause very serious damage by destroying the protectfve exterior surface and exposing the softer interior to rapid deterioratfon. This damage cannot be repaired. Pointfng soft historic masonry with a strong Portland cement mix or synthetfc caulking compound. Hard mortars will damage soft historic masonry such as brick. Paintfng or sealing historic masonry that has not been painted. Exception For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Average temperatures No movement Flexible Mortar (Lime) Inflexible Mortar (Cement) Average temperatures No movement Hot (Bricks expand) Mortar compresses Cold (Bricks contract) Mortar flexes Hot (Bricks expand) Spalding Cold (Bricks contract) Cracks open up 25 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Paint schemes should be simple. Colors should be selected to complement the style and period of the building. The Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission has literature that recommends historically appropriate paint colors and schemes. For informatfon please contact the Preservatfon Planner. A building permit is not required for paintfng and historic review is not required, though, the Commission may include provisions regarding paint and color for certain projects which do require a permit and historic review. 4.9 Paint and Color Color #2 Trim Color # 1 Wall Color #3 Window Sash Typically black or dark green Recommended: Paint Color Choosing a color scheme that is consistent with the architectural style of the building. Typically, this would be one color for the body of the building, one or two colors for the trim, and black or dark green for the window sashes and storm windows. If a horizontal board delineates the upper floor of the building, a second color may be used for the upper floor walls. Pressure Treated Lumber Pressure treated lumber should be allowed to cure for a period of six months to one year prior to paintfng or staining due to high moisture content Repaintfng Removing loose and peeling paint and cleaning the surfaces to be painted in accordance with pertfnent State and Federal guidelines. Practfces that help reduce the potentfal for the creatfon of lead dust, such as mistfng surfaces with water when scraping, are encouraged. Old paint that is sound and reasonably smooth should be left in place as a foundatfon for the new paint. Taking all recommended safety precautfons, including using a proper respirator to avoid breathing the fumes or dust from lead-based paint. Covering the ground and plants adjacent to the work area with plastfc tarps to catch lead-based paint chips and dust Collectfng and properly disposing of paint chips and other waste. Priming, caulking, and finishing with high- quality products. Removing any grayed surface of weathered wood by sanding. Treatfng dry wood with linseed oil and priming with an oil-based primer. Windows Finishing approved non-wood window sashes in a dark color such as black or dark green. Not Recommended: Paint Color (Continued on page 26) 264.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Porches are the focus of many historic buildings and help define their overall character. In historic residentfal neighborhoods, front porches help to establish a sense of community. Front porches and sun porches should be preserved for both their architectural and social value. Recommended: Historic Porches  Repairing historic porches and conserving as much of the historic material as possible.  Replacing badly deteriorated components with new ones that match the historic components in design and material. Custom fabricatfon of columns, brackets, pedestals, and moldings may be necessary, but many porch components can be ordered through lumber yards.  Using vertfcal-grained fir porch flooring for its resistance to weathering.  Constructfng or replacing missing balustrades and handrails using historic photographs or in a style that is consistent with both the building and neighborhood (See sectfon 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails for more details). Using wood steps for a wood porch and tfle, brick, or concrete steps for a masonry porch. Leaving exposed the support piers below the porch columns. Skirtfng must be added to fill the space below the porch floor and grade if this space is 18 inches or greater. The skirt must be located between the porch piers. Constructfng porch skirtfng using a 3-6 inch wood frame with slats fastened to the back of the frame in a vertfcal or lattice pattern. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood only if the substftute material retains the appearance and functfon of the original wood. The substftute must be durable, accept paint, and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. Disallowed: Historic Porches Removing a historic front porch. Changing the original roof pitch. Newer materials including EPDM rubber sheetfng and heat–sealed asphalt products make the maintenance of low-pitched roofs easier than in years past.  Enclosing front porches or other porches that are highly visible from the street with permanent windows and/or walls. Unique porch guidelines exist for the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District. In this district traditfonal front porches were not used and are not permitted. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. New Materials Using wrought iron elements unless they were part of the historic design. Using unpainted treated wood for elements that would have been painted in their historic applicatfons. Using precast concrete steps on the front or (Continued on page 27) Choosing bright, obtrusive colors. Paintfng a building entfrely white. Repaintfng Dry sanding, sandblastfng or using high-pressure sprayers to remove paint from masonry or wood. Using high heat or open flames for paint removal. Using paint strippers containing methylene chloride. Using other methods with a high potentfal to create lead dust that are discouraged by State and Federal guidelines. Diagonal Lattice Typical Skirting Designs Vertical Slats Orthogonal Lattice 4.10 Porches Proper usage of respiratory protection and heat to prevent the distribution of lead dust 27 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons New Materials Porch floors may be concrete if the floor is no more than 18 inches above grade. Porches with floors that are more than 18 inches above grade must be built using traditfonal porch constructfon with wood joists and wood flooring. Pretreated porch decking or dimensional lumber may be used for decking provided the gaps between the floorboards do not exceed 1/8 inch. Porches on rear elevatfons need not reproduce historic details. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Noncontributfng Propertfes in Historic Districts All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts side elevatfon if the steps will be highly visible from the street. They are acceptable on the rear elevatfon. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood that does not retain the appearance, functfon, and paintability of the original wood. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Roof Cornice Column Baluster Floor Skirting Pier 284.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Wood siding is prevalent throughout the historic neighborhoods in Iowa City. Most often it is plain clapboard siding with an exposure between 3 and 5 inches; however, it is sometfmes tongue and groove, shiplap, or wall shingle siding. Wood siding along with the trim details and a variety of paint colors combine to make one of the most important defining characteristfcs of historic districts. This display of detail and color is essentfal to the character of the older neighborhoods, and therefore siding is protected by the design guidelines. The primary threat to the traditional appearance of older neighborhoods has been the application of synthetic siding. This has been installed in an effort to avoid periodic painting. While synthetic siding may last longer than an application of paint, it does deteriorate over time and does need to be replaced when it fades, cracks, dents, or deteriorates. The application of synthetic siding covers many architectural details of a building, damages the historic siding and trim, traps moisture within the walls, and in some cases, necessitates the removal of historic elements altogether. For all of these reasons the covering of historic properties with synthetic siding is not allowed. The presence of modern insulation in the walls of historic homes can also result in moisture damage. For recommendations on ways to improve the energy efficiency of a historic home, please reference section 4.4 Energy Efficiency. 4.11 Siding Clapboard siding Staggered edge shingle siding Board and Batten Siding Typical Siding Types found in Iowa City Recommended Historic Siding Repairing historic wood siding and trim. Replacing deteriorated sectfons of wood siding with new or salvaged wood siding that matches the historic wood siding. Removing synthetfc siding and repairing historic wood siding and trim. Synthetfc Siding Replacing synthetfc siding with siding to match the original siding of the structure. Matching synthetfc siding may be used to repair damage to small sectfons of existfng synthetfc siding. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood siding only if the substftute material retains the appearance and functfon of the original wood. The substftute material must be durable, accept paint and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. In many applicatfons, fiber cement board with a smooth finish is an approved wood substftute. Disallowed Historic Trim Removing historic trim pieces such as door and window trim, skirt and frieze boards, and corner boards. Covering historic trim such as door and window trim, skirt and frieze boards, and corner boards. Synthetfc Siding Applying synthetfc siding such as aluminum, vinyl, or false masonry siding. (Continued on page 29) 29 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Shingle siding Fish scale siding Dutch lap (drop) siding Exceptions In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain properties, the Commission has documented a number of exceptions to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptions corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservation Planner or Preservation Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptions to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applications in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutions in cases where a proposed construction project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exception to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in Historic Districts Noncontributfng and Non- Historic Properties in Conservation Districts Noncontributing and Non- Historic Outbuildings in Conservation Districts. Synthetfc Siding May be Considered Provided the Following Conditfons: Noncontributfng and non-historic structures be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine the architectural merit of the property under consideratfon. Some noncontributfng and non-historic structures were classified according to an architectural style or constructfon period inconsistent with the district, but nevertheless remain important propertfes and worthy of preservatfon. For structures already possessing synthetfc siding, other factors besides the presence of synthetfc siding should exist which prevents the structure from being considered a contributfng structure to the district. Otherwise, alteratfons should be encouraged which will enable the property to become contributfng to the district. All sources of moisture that have caused damage to the structure are corrected and the damage repaired prior to the application of the siding. Historic architectural features such as window trim, brackets, moldings, rafter tails, columns, balusters and similar details are not covered, removed, cut or otherwise damaged. Unless severely deteriorated, historic wood siding must not be removed. To the extent possible, the synthetic siding appears similar to the original wood siding in exposure, texture and design. Trim boards extend in front of the face of the siding. The synthetic siding does not have a simulated wood grain. (Continued on page 30) Synthetic siding may be removed, and if original wood siding exists underneath it may be repaired or removed and replaced with wood or an approved alternative material, provided the following conditions: Synthetic siding covers the original wood siding. Evidence of technical or economic challenges is noted related to the deteriorated condition of the original wood siding or the impact that rehabilitation may have on building performance, health or safety. If original wood siding is removed, it must be replaced with an appropriate material that matches in exposure, texture, and design. Economic challenges could exist in situations where compliance with the guidelines results in costs that are exorbitant. In order to demonstrate an economic challenge, applicants must submit detailed cost estimates. Staff and the Commission can evaluate if the added costs to comply with the guidelines is necessary or if there is another less costly solution. Staff and the Commission can evaluate other technical or economic challenges on a case-by-case basis. The following exception provides flexibility to owners of eligible buildings with existing synthetic siding installed over original wood siding. The City recommends repair of original wood siding over replacement whenever feasible. Removal of the synthetic siding and repair of the original wood siding and trim is often the most sustainable and affordable solution. However, some property owners may have legitimate economic or technical concerns due to the deteriorated condition of the original wood siding or the impact rehabilitation may have on building performance, health or safety such as the potential for moisture damage due to the presence of modern insulation. Therefore, this exception encourages City staff and the Commission to consult with homeowners and/or their professional agents to assess applications involving the presence of synthetic siding and provide flexibility to situations where property owners wish to avoid economical and technical challenges such as moisture damage, remove the synthetic siding and the original siding, and replace it with an appropriate material as described in this handbook that matches in exposure, texture, and design. Local historic landmarks and key contributing properties in historic and conservation districts are not eligible for this exception. This exception only applies to buildings with wood siding and not stucco, stone, or brick. Applies to Non-Historic Properties inHistoric and Conservation Districts NŽŶ-ĐŽŶƚƌŝďƵƚŝŶŐ and CŽŶƚƌŝďƵƚŝŶŐƉƌŽƉĞƌƚŝĞƐ in Historic and Conservation Districts PƌŝŵĂƌLJƐƚƌƵĐƚƵƌĞƐĂŶĚŽƵƚďƵŝůĚŝŶŐƐ͕ŝŶHŝƐƚŽƌŝĐĂŶĚCŽŶƐĞƌǀĂƚŝŽŶDŝƐƚƌŝĐƚƐ 304.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook • • • Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons 31 324.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Site features and landscaping can contribute significantly to the character of a neighborhood, streetscape or property. Accommodatfng parking, site access and other modern outdoor needs should be done in a discreet manner. To the extent possible, these modern site features should be located in the backyard and accessed from an alley. 4.12 Site and Landscaping Recommended: Disability Access Following the recommendatfons for ramps in 5.2 Decks and Ramps. Fences Installing fences between the street and the front facade that are 4 feet or less in height. Designing fences to be similar to historic fence styles, such as wood picket fences, and wrought iron or metal fences. Paintfng wood fences. Parking Providing parking behind the primary structure on a lot where possible. If parking must be located along the side of an existfng or new primary structure, it must be set back from the front plane of the building a minimum of 10 feet and be screened by a decoratfve fence, landscaping, or a combinatfon of a decoratfve fence and landscaping, and approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. Providing a minimum of 5 feet setback from all property lines for parking areas of 4 or more spaces Pedestrian Access Providing a sidewalk that connects the entrance door or porch to the public sidewalk. Sidewalks, Streets, and Walls Repairing historic brick paving materials and masonry retaining walls. Constructfng new driveways to be similar to historic driveways in the neighborhoods. Typically these driveways are 8-10 feet in width and may have only a three foot sectfon for each track paved, leaving grass in the center of the drive. Vegetatfon Removing large trees that are planted closer than 20 feet to historic buildings and shrubs planted closer than 5 feet. Trees, shrubs and other substantfal plantfngs can increase the moisture and mold at the exterior walls and the roots can damage foundatfons. Vehicular Access Providing vehicular access from an alley when available. Driveways leading from the (Continued on page 33) Street Street Minimum 10 feet setback behind front of primary building Minimum 5 feet setback from property line if more than 4 spaces Decorative fence and landscape screen Sidewalk connecting entrance door to public sidewalk 8-10 feet wide driveway 33 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Installing chain link, wire mesh or rail fences in locatfons highly visible from the street. Sidewalks, Streets, and Walls Replacing historic brick paving with concrete. Vegetatfon Removing mature trees, unless tree is causing damage to a building, is diseased, or is structurally unsound, as determined by a professional arborist. Exception For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. 4.13 Windows Head Casing Muntin Bars Light/pane Sash Sill street to garages or parking at the rear of the property should be one lane in width, but can be widened toward the back of the lot to provide access to multf-stall garages or parking spaces. Disallowed: Fences Removing historic metal fences. Parking Providing parking spaces between the primary structure and the street. Vehicular Access Adding curb cuts and driveways from the street when access is available from an alley. Not Recommended: Fences Windows are one of the most important elements that define a building’s architectural character. Important window characteristfcs and elements include the window type, size, proportfon, trim— lintels, sills, decoratfve hoods and pediments, pattern of divided lights, mullions, sash and decoratfve glass. Most often, historic windows are double-hung, but casements were occasionally used. Except for small decoratfve windows, historic windows are generally taller than they are wide, and the lower and upper floor windows are often aligned vertfcally. The Commission recommends repair of historic windows before replacement is considered, and requires documentatfon of the extent of deterioratfon in order to approve replacement of windows. Recommended: Attic Windows, Vents, Window Air-Conditfon Units and Other Similar Openings Preserving historic attic windows, their trim and installing traditfonal wood vents. Locatfng new attic openings in a manner that is compatfble with the historic window pattern. Locatfng window air-conditfoning units on a building elevatfon which is not highly visible from the street. Historic Windows Preserving the historic windows by repairing sashes and frames. Retaining historic window frames and replacing badly deteriorated sashes with new sashes that match the historic ones. New Windows Adding windows that match the type, size, sash width, trim, use of divided lights, and overall appearance of the historic windows. Adding new windows in a locatfon that is consistent with the window pattern of the historic building or buildings of similar architectural style. (Continued on page 34) 344.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Outbuilding Windows Windows on outbuildings should be relatfvely small and rectangular or square. Relocatfon and Closing Window Openings If an opening is to be relocated, it should not detract from overall fenestratfon pattern. If an opening is to be closed on a brick structure, it should be recessed to express the original opening and lintels and sills should be maintained. On a framed structure, appropriate siding that matches the existfng should be used with its members being placed across and randomly extended beyond the opening. Replacement Windows Replacing badly deteriorated windows with new ones that match the type, size, sash width, trim, use of divided lights, and overall appearance of the historic windows. Using new wood windows to replace deteriorated historic wood windows, although the use of metal-clad, solid-wood windows is acceptable. All replacement windows and trim must accept paint. Typically, sashes will be finished in a dark color, either black or dark green. Divided lights may be true or simulated. Simulated divided lights may be created with muntfn bars that are permanently adhered to both sides of the glass, preferably with spacer bars between the panes of insulatfng glass. Replacing a bedroom window, if required for egress by the Building Code, with a new one that matches the size, trim, use of divided lights, and overall appearance. Storm Windows and Shutters Installing traditfonal wood storm windows Typical window types: Double Hung window Awning window Casement window Slider window and screens on older buildings. Storms should fit the opening exactly, without the use of spacers. Installing wood-frame combinatfon storm windows with screens that resemble traditfonal wood storm windows. The use of metal-clad, wood-frame combinatfon storm windows is acceptable. Storm windows must accept paint and should be painted the same color as the sash of the main windows, preferably black. Any new shutters should be proportfonate so that they cover the windows if closed. The shutters should be compatfble with the style of the historic house and should be louvered or paneled wood constructfon. Disallowed: New and Replacement Windows Installing modern types of windows including sliding, awning, casement, and bay windows when they were not original to the building, consistent with the architectural style, or required for egress. Installing metal, vinyl-clad or vinyl windows on primary structures or on contributfng outbuildings when they were not original to the building. Using between-the-glass grilles or snap-in grilles to achieve the appearance of divided lights. Introducing new window openings into primary elevatfons. Shutters Installing shutters on windows on a structure that did not historically have shutters. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa (Continued on page 35) 35 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to All Propertfes New and Replacement Windows Fiberglass windows may be considered for basement windows with moisture problems. Modern window types may be considered on a case-by-case basis in situatfons where multfple window types exist on a building. Glass block may be considered in situatfons where the glass would not be visible from the street, or where privacy issues exist. Change in window size may be allowed for egress requirements. The change of window size should be considered a last resort. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in all Districts New and Replacement Windows Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be considered for replacement windows provided they match historical proportfons. Applies to Noncontributfng and Non- Historic Propertfes in all Districts Outbuilding Windows Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be considered, provided they match appropriate historical outbuilding window proportfons. Applies to Noncontributfng and Non- Historic Propertfes in Historic Districts All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts New and Replacement Windows Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be used for replacement of basement windows provided the foundatfon wall is no more than 18 inches above grade. Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be considered for primary buildings in if existfng windows are vinyl or vinyl-clad wood. Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be considered for additfons provided they match historical proportfons. 364.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Most of the structures in Iowa City’s historic neighborhoods are of wood frame constructfon and have wood siding. Many dwellings have wood elements such as trim, windows, doors, porches, cornices, decoratfve elements, and pediments. While most wood is relatfvely inexpensive, durable, and easy to work with, it must be maintained properly to have a long life. 4.14 Wood Paint stripped from balusters and some decay is found Small decay holes filled with epoxy, larger ones replaced with new wood Original balusters are repaired and repainted retaining the original material and integrity no simulated wood grain MiraTech and similar materials have been approved for above-grade applicatfons on a case-by-case basis. Polyethylene/sawdust composite materials, such as Trex, are appropriate on a case-by- case basis Deck and Porch Materials Pressure treated lumber should be allowed to cure for a period of six months to one year prior to paintfng due to high moisture content. Disallowed: Historic Wood Covering original wood siding, soffits and eave boards with another material such as vinyl or aluminum siding. Using destructfve and dangerous paint removal methods such as sandblastfng, water blastfng, or burning with a propane or butane torch. Removal of historic wood elements such as trim, porches, cornices, and decoratfve elements. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood that does not retain the appearance, functfon, and paintability of the original wood. Exception For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Recommended: Historic Wood Repairing historic wood elements rather than replacing them. Using epoxy products, such as Wood Epox and Liquid Wood by Abatron, to consolidate deteriorated wood components, and fill or reconstruct missing wood. Duplicatfng and replacing historic wood elements when they cannot be repaired. Replacing damaged wood components with new or salvaged wood components that match the historic ones. Monitoring wood surfaces for signs of excessive water damage, rot, or pest infestatfon. Keeping all surfaces primed, painted and appropriately caulked in order to prevent wood deterioratfon. Eliminatfng excessive moisture problems such as leaky roofs, gutters, and downspouts. The improper ventfng of baths, kitchens, basements, and dryers may cause moisture problems. Removing vegetatfon that is growing against the wood elements or siding. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood only if the substftute material retains the appearance and functfon of the original wood. The substftute material must be durable, accept paint, and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. For many applicatfons, fiber cement board is an approved substftute for wood provided the fiber cement board is smooth faced with 37 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 4.0 Guidelines for Alteratfons Worn Paint, Wood in good condition Peeling Paint, Wood likely in good condition Peeling Paint, Wood may be in bad condition Peeling Paint, Wood at bottom is rotting 385.0 Guidelines for Additfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook When planning an additfon that expands the building footprint, consider first how a new exterior form and roof can be added to the existfng house in a manner that is compatfble with the design of the historic building. Often, the desired interior space dictates the locatfon and size of the additfon, and the resultfng roofline and form appear awkward and inconsistent with the historic structure. The Historic Preservatfon Commission strongly recommends using a design professional to help evaluate space needs and plan a compatfble additfon. Additfons to structures in districts must also comply with the guidelines in sectfon 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. 5.0 Guidelines for Additions 5.1 Expansion of Building Footprint An additfon to a historic house is often required to accommodate an expanding family, home office or modern lifestyle. These guidelines are for additfons that expand the interior living space or building footprint, as well as for other attached structures such as new porches, decks and ramps. Recommended: Balustrades and Handrails Following the guidelines for new balustrades and handrails in sectfon 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails. Chimneys Constructfng new exterior fireplace chimneys of masonry or stucco if the chimney is highly visible from the street. Building Façade Unique surface area guidelines exist for street elevatfons in the Longfellow Neighborhood, generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 800 square feet. For Governor, Bowery, and Court Streets the total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1200 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon. For Summit Street the total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1500 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon, and no more than 750 square feet for a new outbuilding building. For the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District the street elevatfon must be no more than 450 square feet for a new primary building or an existfng building including a new additfon. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique surface area guidelines exist for street elevatfons in the College Hill Neighborhood, generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 1200 square feet. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique surface guidelines exist for street elevatfons in the Northside Neighborhood., generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 1200 square feet. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Building Height and Mass Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the Longfellow Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to no more than two stories. For the Summit Street Historic District single-family houses must have two full stories in the principal portfon of the building. For the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District single-family houses must be one story in height. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the College Hill Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to no more than two stories in height. For College Street single-family houses and duplexes must be two stories in height. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the Northside Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to one-and-a-half or two stories. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Design Preserving significant historic materials and features of the original structure such as decoratfve windows, brackets, porches, and trim. Designing an additfon so that it does not diminish the character of the historic structure. Distfnguishing between the historic structure and the new additfon. This may be accomplished easily by offsetting the walls of the additfon from the walls of the original structure or by connectfng additfons with a (Continued on page 39) 39 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 5.0 Guidelines for Additfons breezeway. Matching key horizontal “lines” on the existfng building, such as water table, eave height, window head height and band boards, in order to provide contfnuity between the additfon and the historic structure. Using a palette of materials that is similar to that used on the historic structure. Placing building additfons at the rear of a property, if possible. Additfons at or near the front of an existfng building must be set back at least 18 inches from the front plane of the historic building, and must be differentfated by a change in the roofline or other means. Doors Installing doors in additfons that match the material of historic doors, and have a similar style and appearance as the historic doors in the existfng building. Installing French doors, or doors of a similar type, in additfons where a large opening is desired. Following the guidelines for new doors in sectfon 4.3 Doors. Foundatfons Constructfng an additfon foundatfon that appears similar to the historic foundatfon in color, texture, unit size, and joint profile. Masonry When using masonry on an additfon, using new masonry that appears similar in color, texture, unit size, and joint profile to the historic masonry. Mass and Roofline Constructfng additfons that are consistent with the massing and roofline of the historic building. This requires that the wall areas and corners, as well as the roof pitches and spans are all consistent with the existfng building and have a proportfon that is similar to that of the existfng building. Constructfng the roof overhang, soffits and eaves of the additfon so that they match the roof overhang, soffits and eaves of the existfng building. When the eaves of an additfon intersect the eaves of the existfng building, care should be taken to assure that the two eaves align properly. The trim details of a new eave should match the eave details of the existfng building. New Porches Constructfng new porches that are consistent with the historic building or similar to porches of the same architectural style. Constructfng new porches that are more than 18 inches above grade using traditfonal porch constructfon with wood joists and wood flooring. Adding skirtfng to fill the space between the porch floor and grade if this space is 24 inches or greater. The skirt should be constructed between the porch piers. Paint and Color Paintfng additfons to match the existfng historic building. Setbacks Unique setback guidelines exist for Summit Street, located within the Summit Street Historic District and the Longfellow Neighborhood. On this street the rear wall of the primary structures must not extend deeper than 125 feet from the front street. This restrictfon preserves the openness of the rear yards. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Siding Applying siding to a new additfon that appears similar in size, shape, texture, and material to the existfng siding on the (Continued on page 40) Recommended: Connecting additions with a breezeway. This provides for an easy way to distinguish the original house from the addition. Recommended: Additions matching the roof pitch and type as the original structure. Key horizontal lines, such as eaves, are carried into the new addition. 40 5.0 Guidelines for Additfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook historic building. Windows Using windows that are of a similar type, proportfon and divided light pattern as those in the original structure. Following the guidelines for new windows in sectfon 4.13 Windows. Wood Constructfng additfons with materials that appear similar to the historic siding, trim, moldings, and other details of the original building. Disallowed: Design Constructfng an additfon between the historic building and the street. Leaving large expanses of wall surface uninterrupted by windows or doors. Constructfng an additfon that is not distfnguishable from the historic building. Constructfng an additfon that expands a historic house vertfcally and increases its overall height. Remodeling an attic space and adding dormers is acceptable. Porches Adding space to a structure by enclosing a historic front or side porch. Unique porch guidelines exist for the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District. In this district traditfonal front porches were not used and are not permitted. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique setback guidelines exist for the Summit Street Historic District, located within the Longfellow Neighborhood. In this district attached garages are not allowed. Garages must be located at the rear of the property whenever possible. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Siding Using synthetfc siding on an additfon instead of the historic siding type or a substftute material approved by the HPC, unless an exceptfon is provided by the HPC. Exceptions In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type Disallowed: Constructing additions between the front of the house and the street or that alter the historic street facing elevation. Disallowed: Constructing an addition that increases the height of the original structure or alters the roofline. Disallowed: Constructing additions that alter the roofline of the original structure, use a differing roof pitch, or do not match up key horizontal lines. Disallowed: Constructing additions that are taller than the original structure or that alter the roofline. 41 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 5.0 Guidelines for Additfons Gutters and Downspouts Additfons need not have built-in gutters unless the new gutters align with the built-in gutters of the existfng building. For instance, a one-story additfon need not have built-in gutters if it is attached to a two-story wall. New Foundatfons For additfons to foundatfons, concrete or textured concrete block may be used in place of masonry units that appear similar to the original masonry. For additfons to foundatfons, it is acceptable to match the color of the original foundatfon by using paint or masonry stain rather than matching the material and appearance of the original foundatfon material. New Masonry Additfons to masonry structures may be sided with wood. The siding type must be consistent with the age and architectural style of the historic building. The trim must be consistent with both the siding type and the architectural style of the building. Any substftute materials must be durable, accept paint, and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. Porches Porch floors may be concrete if the floor is no more than 18 inches above grade. Porches with floors that are more than 18 inches above grade must be built using traditfonal porch constructfon with wood joists and wood flooring. Pretreated porch decking or dimensional lumber may be used provided the gaps between the floorboards do not exceed 1/8 inch. Porches on rear elevatfons need not reproduce historic details. Windows Modern window types, such as casement windows, may be used in additfons provided they have overall proportfons comparable to those found on the historic building, and a similar divided light pattern. The windows must be trimmed to match the historic windows in the building. The windows may be installed side-by-side, but they must have a mullion between them if mullions were used between windows on the historic building. Transom-like or half-round fixed glass units may be used if they create a traditfonal-looking window arrangement consistent with the historic building style. Wood Window trim, door trim, fascia and frieze boards, and corner and band boards on additfons must be similar to those on the historic building. However, other details of the historic building may be omitted, simplified, or enhanced on additfons as long as they are compatfble with the existfng structure. Applies to Noncontributfng and Non- Historic Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Noncontributfng and Non- Historic Outbuildings in Conservatfon Districts Synthetfc Siding May be Considered Provided the Following Conditfons: (Continued on page 42) listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to Setback Additfons in Historic Districts All Additfons in Conservatfon Districts 425.0 Guidelines for Additfons Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Decks and ramps are features that are not typical to historic structures. They are modern inventfons designed to meet the needs of our modern lifestyle and building codes. As such, it is not necessary that they duplicate the details of the building to which they are attached. However, they should be as unob- trusive as possible. These guidelines shall also be used for multf-family structures. Ramps may be approved that accommodate reasonable access and use by disabled occupants provided they do not significantly alter or detract from the historic character of the building. The Historic Preser- vatfon Commission will work with applicants to find designs that will accommodate their needs and that are compatfble with the historic character of the building. Recommended: 5.2 Decks and Ramps Decks Locatfng a new deck on the back of a prima- ry building, opposite the street-facing facade and set in from the side walls at least 8 inch- es. Designing decks so that the size, scale and locatfon do not detract from the character of the district’s rear yards, if significant to the district. Attaching decks to the building in a manner that will not damage a historic exterior wall or, other historic materials, or cause wood siding to deteriorate. Following the guidelines in sectfon 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails. If creatfng a screened porch structure, following the guidelines for porches in sectfon 5.1 Expansion of Building Foot print. Ramps Designing ramps so they do not detract from the historic character of the building. To the extent possible, the yard should be graded to create a portfon of the incline of the ramp. Locatfng a new ramp, or as much of the new ramp as possible, on the side of the building. Incorporatfng a ramp into a porch. Landscaping around a ramp to soften the visual impact of the structure from the street. Following the guidelines in sectfon 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails. Disallowed: (Continued on page 43) Noncontributfng and non-historic structures be evaluated on a case-by-case basis to determine the architectural merit of the property under consideratfon. Some noncontributfng and non-historic structures were classified according to an architectural style or constructfon period inconsistent with the district, but nevertheless remain important propertfes and worthy of preservatfon. For structures already possessing synthetfc siding, other factors besides the presence of synthetfc siding should exist which prevents the structure from being considered a contributfng structure to the district. Otherwise, siding for additfons should be encouraged which will not further degrade the property. To the extent possible, the synthetfc siding appears similar to the original wood siding in exposure, texture and design. Trim boards extend in front of the face of the siding. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in All Districts New Balustrades and Handrails Alternatfve baluster and handrail designs may be considered. 43 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 5.0 Guidelines for Additfons Inappropriate railing for deck or ramp Decks Constructfng a deck between the street and the street-facing facade if it detracts from the neighborhood or is not compatfble with the architectural style of the existfng build- ing. Leaving balusters and railings unpainted if they are highly visible from the street. Ramps Constructfng a ramp that extends more than 8 feet in front of the primary, street -facing facade. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has document- ed a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applica- tfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a pro- posed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic struc- ture. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Appropriate railing for deck or ramp 446.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook These guidelines are intended to ensure that new buildings are compatfble with the character of the neighborhood where the new constructfon is to occur. Although most of the lots in Iowa City’s historic neighborhoods are developed, occasionally the opportunity to construct a new primary structure on a vacant lot may arise, or to replace a non-historic building that has been destroyed. Most of the new structures built are garages or other outbuildings. Proposed new buildings must also comply with 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines and with 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition, if applicable. The content of 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines is used to determine the appropriate size, scale, site locatfon and architectural style of the new building. These factors are dependent on the character of the surrounding neighborhood and district. 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition requires approval for demolitfon and of new building plans prior to issuance of a demolitfon permit. Recommended: Balustrades and Handrails Following the guidelines for new balustrades and handrails in sectfon 4.1 Balustrades and Handrails. If second-story porches are constructed, placing them above first-story porches or first-floor interior spaces. Building Façade Unique surface area guidelines exist for street elevatfons in the Longfellow Neighborhood, generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 800 square feet. For Governor, Bowery, and Court Streets the total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1200 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon. For Summit Street the total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1500 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon. For the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District the street elevatfon must be no more than 450 square feet for a new primary building or an existfng building including a new additfon. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique surface area guidelines exist for 6.0 Guidelines for New Construction 6.1 New Primary Structures street elevatfons in the College Hill Neighborhood, generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 1200 square feet. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique surface are guidelines exist for street elevatfons in the Northside Neighborhood., generally restrictfng surface area to no more than 1200 square feet. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Building Height and Mass Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the Longfellow Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to no more than two stories. For the Summit Street Historic District single-family houses must have two full stories in the principal portfon of the building. For the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District single-family houses must be one story in height. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the (Continued on page 45) New construction shall be of an appropriate size, scale, site location, and architectural style compared to the existing historic structures in the neighborhood. Inappropriate new construction 45 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 6.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon College Hill Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to no more than two stories. For College Street single-family houses and duplexes must be two stories in height. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Unique height and mass guidelines exist for single-family houses or duplexes in the Northside Neighborhood, restrictfng the height to one-and-a-half or two stories. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Decks and Ramps For guidelines on constructfng decks and ramps, see 5.2 Decks and Ramps. Design Designing a new primary structure in a similar style to the architectural styles prevalent in the district. See the 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines for the architectural styles that are appropriate for each district. Once an architectural style for a new primary building is selected, following the specificatfons in sectfon 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City. This sectfon describes the massing, roofline, siding, windows, doors, porches and other architectural features for each historic style. Doors Adding exterior doors on front or side elevatfons of buildings that have half- or full- light windows and/or raised panel constructfon, and are consistent with the architectural style. Dormers Following the guidelines for new dormers in sectfon 4.7 Mass and Rooflines. Masonry Using masonry that has a similar appearance to the masonry on historic buildings of a similar architectural style. Paint and Color Where synthetfc siding is allowed, using a color scheme that is consistent with the architectural style of the building. Porches Constructfng front porches that are consistent with the architectural style of the building. Front porches are a character- defining element in Iowa City districts. Using vertfcal-grained fir porch flooring for the porch decking. Using wood or an approved wood substftute that accepts paint for porch posts, trim and other components. Constructfng new porches that are more than 18 inches above grade using traditfonal porch constructfon with wood joists and wood flooring. Adding a skirtfng to fill the space between the porch floor and grade if this space is 24 inches or greater. The skirt should be constructed between the porch piers. Setbacks For new primary buildings, locatfng the building a distance from the street so that the setback is consistent with the setbacks of existfng principal buildings located along the same frontage. Unique setback guidelines exist for Summit Street, located within the Summit Street Historic District and the Longfellow Neighborhood. On this street the rear wall of the primary structures must not extend deeper than 125 feet from the front street. This restrictfon preserves the openness of the rear yards. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Siding Using siding that is consistent with the architectural style of the new building. Most historic siding in Iowa City is wood. Fiber cement siding with a smooth finish is an acceptable substftute for wood siding in most circumstances. Windows Specifying the window type, proportfon, shape, profile, divided light pattern, and placement based on the architectural style of the new structure and contributfng structures of a similar style. (Continued on page 46) 466.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Using windows that are made of wood. The use of metal-clad, solid-wood windows is acceptable. Windows and trim must accept paint. Divided lights must be created with muntfns that are adhered to both sides of the glass. Placing small decoratfve windows in the attic level of front gable ends if consistent with the architectural style. Adding wood (or an acceptable wood substftute) window trim that is three to four inches in width if the exterior walls are sided with wood. Wood Using wood or an approved wood substftute for building trim and features such as corner boards, window trim, frieze boards, columns, brackets and similar features. Wood Substftutes Substftutfng a material in place of wood only if the substftute material retains the appearance and functfon of wood. The substftute material must be durable, accept paint, and be approved by the Historic Preservatfon Commission. For many applicatfons, fiber cement board with a smooth finish is an approved wood substftute. Disallowed: Doors Installing sliding glass patfo doors in any locatfon that is highly visible from the street. Constructfng balconies that protrude from the walls without vertfcal supports on the front or sides of the building. Masonry Using synthetfc masonry materials such as artfficial stone. Porches Unique porch guidelines exist for the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District. In this district traditfonal front porches were not used and are not permitted. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Constructfng a new front porch that is entfrely enclosed with walls and/or windows. Only a portfon of a front porch may be enclosed with screens to provide a sitting area that is to the side of the steps and front entrance of the house. The screens should be set behind the columns and balustrades to create an appearance that is consistent with the architectural style. Windows Using snap-in muntfn bars to create the appearance of divided lights. Not Recommended: Attached Garages Constructfng attached garages. However, if constructed, they should be set back at least 20 feet from the street-facing plane of the building. Masonry Using thin veneer masonry. Shutters Adding shutters if shutters are not consistent with the architectural style of the building. Exceptions In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The (Continued on page 47) 47 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 6.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Porches Porch floors may be concrete if the floor is no more than 18 inches above grade. Porch floors that are more than 18 inches above grade must be built in a traditfonal way with wood joists and wood flooring. Pretreated porch decking or dimensional lumber may be used provided the gaps between the floorboards do not exceed 1/8 inch. Porches on rear elevatfons need not reproduce historic details. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in All Districts New Balustrades and Handrails Alternatfve baluster and handrail designs may be considered. Applies to Non-Historic Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Siding Synthetfc siding may be used on new primary structures, provided all window and door trim, corner boards, band boards or other trim are wood or an approved wood substftute. Windows Vinyl and vinyl-clad wood windows may be used on new primary structures. 486.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Recommended: Building Façade Unique surface area guidelines exist for street elevatfons for Summit Street., located within the Summit Street Historic District and the Longfellow Neighborhood. On this street the total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 750 square feet for a new outbuilding building. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Design Placing new outbuildings, including garages, to the rear of the primary building. Constructfng garages and other outbuildings that are clearly subordinate in size and ornamentatfon to the primary structure. Constructfng new outbuildings that reflect the style of the primary structure. The primary structure will typically reflect a style of architecture prevalent within the district. See the 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines for the architectural styles that are appropriate for each district. Garage Doors Installing garage doors that are simple in design. Smooth or simple panel-type garage doors may be used. Carriage-style doors in a style appropriate to the property may also be used. Adding trim around the garage door openings that matches the trim of other doors and windows on the building. 6.2 New Outbuildings Installing single-car garage doors. Double-car garage doors are discouraged. Windows Incorporatfng windows into the design that are relatfvely small and rectangular. Disallowed: Attached Garages Unique outbuilding guidelines exist for the Summit Street Historic District, located within the Longfellow Neighborhood. In this district attached garages are not allowed. Garages must be located at the rear of the property whenever possible. Refer to 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Siding The use of synthetfc siding such as aluminum, vinyl, or false masonry siding for an outbuilding in a historic district. Not Recommended: Attached Garages Constructfng garages attached to the primary building. Exceptions In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa (Continued on page 49) Asphalt Shingles Gable Vent or Window Lap Siding (3-5” reveal) Frieze Board (6-8”) Corner Boards Door and Window trim Single garage doors (either simple or a compatible style) Simple garage designs that are appropriate on most properties in Iowa City 49 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 6.0 Guidelines for New Constructfon City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. Applies to All Propertfes in Conservatfon Districts Design New outbuildings may reflect the historic outbuilding styles in the neighborhood or the style of the primary building. Siding Synthetfc siding may be used on new outbuildings. Windows Vinyl or vinyl-clad wood windows may be used on new outbuildings. 50 7.0 Guidelines for Demolitfon Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Recommended: Removing additfons or alteratfons that are not historic and that significantly detract from the building’s historic charac- ter or that are structurally unsound and are a safety hazard Removing non-historic buildings and struc- tures that detract from the historic character of a district. Such buildings should be re- placed with buildings that are more compatf- ble with the district. Saving and storing on site any historic archi- tectural features such as windows, doors and trim that are removed from a building or structure. Retaining historic garages. If the period gar- age is insufficient for modern-day vehicles, efforts should be made to construct a new garage on another portfon of the site. 7.0 Guidelines for Demolition All buildings and structures that contribute to a Conservatfon or Historic District; or that are listed or are eligible for listfng on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places, regardless of whether they are in a designated Historic or Conservatfon District, must be preserved against decay, deterioratfon, and kept free from structural defects. Accordingly, all such buildings and structures must be maintained in accordance with the provisions of Sectfon 17-5-19 of the Housing Code, Responsibilitfes of Owners Relatfng to the Maintenance and Occupancy of Premises. The Historic Preservatfon Commission may file a petftfon with the Building Official requestfng investfgatfon of any applicable building or structure suspected of neglect or deterioratfon. The Building Official will proceed with investfgatfon and may take any enforcement actfon necessary to correct or prevent further violatfon. Failure to comply with the stated correctfve actfon may result in penaltfes and/or legal actfon. 7.1 Demolition of Whole Structures or Significant Features Demolitfon involves the complete removal of a building or a portfon of a building. Removal of dormers, decoratfve trim, porches, balusters, chimneys and other significant features requires a permit for demolitfon, and therefore historic review. The Historic Preservatfon Commission will act to ensure the preventfon of demolitfon by neglect and to ensure historically appropriate steps are taken during the remediatfon of dangerous conditfons. Designing replacement garages to be com- patfble in design with the primary structure and/or other outbuildings in the neighbor- hood. See 6.0 Guidelines for New Construc- tion. Disallowed: Demolishing any primary building on a con- tributfng property within a conservatfon or historic district, or any Iowa City Historic Landmark. Removing any historic architectural feature, such as a porch, chimney, bay window, dor- mer, brackets or decoratfve trim, that is sig- nificant to the architectural character and style of the building. Not Recommended: Removing significant historic site features on the property such as brick driveways and iron fences. A Certfficate of Appropriateness for the demolitfon of any primary building on a contributfng property with- in a conservatfon or historic district, or any landmark, will be denied unless the applicant can demonstrate that the building is structurally unsound and irretrievable. A decision to approve a Certfficate of Appropri- ateness for the demolitfon of outbuildings on contributfng and noncontributfng propertfes, and primary buildings on noncontributfng and non-historic propertfes, will be made on a case-by-case basis. For these cases, the Commission will consider the conditfon, integrity and architectural significance of the outbuild- ing or noncontributfng building. A Certfficate of Appropriateness is also required for the removal of any portfon of a building, such as a porch, porch balustrade, decoratfve brackets and trim, dormers, chimney or other architecturally signifi- cant components on any structure within a district, or on any landmark. Before a Certfficate of Appropriateness for demolitfon will be approved for a primary building, the Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission must approve a Certfficate of Appropriateness for the building that will replace the one being demolished. These projects will also be evaluated using 6.0 Guidelines for New Construction and 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines 7.2 Prevention of Demolition by Neglect 51 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines The Longfellow Neighborhood District Guidelines apply to the Summit Street Historic District, Longfellow Historic District (including the Moffitt Cottage Natfonal Register Historic District), Governor- Lucas Street Conservatfon District, Clark Street Conservatfon District, and Dearborn Street Conservatfon District. They apply to single-family, duplex and multf-family buildings in these neighborhood districts. Proposed new multf-family buildings must also comply with 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings. Site and Scale Guidelines Setback, Front On Summit Street only: The rear wall of the primary structures must not extend deeper than 125 feet from the front street. This restrictfon preserves the openness of the rear yards. Building Facade The total surface area of the street elevatfon of a new primary building must be no more than 800 square feet. Existfng primary structures must not be expanded in such a manner that the total surface area exceeds 800 square feet. For the purposes of enforcing this guideline, the total surface area of the street elevatfon is defined as a figure derived by calculatfng the surface area of all wall and roof surfaces, including window and door openings that are visible in a measured drawing of the building’s street elevatfon. On Governor, Bowery, and Court Streets only: The total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1200 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon. On Summit Street only: The total surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 1500 square feet for a new primary building or for an existfng building including a new additfon, and no more than 750 square feet for a new outbuilding. In the Moffitt Cottage National Register Historic District only: The surface area of the street elevatfon must be no more than 450 square feet for a new primary building or an existfng building including a new additfon. Outbuildings In the Summit Street Historic District only: Attached garages are not allowed. Garages must be located at the rear of the property wherever possible. (Continued on page 52) 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines 8.1 Longfellow Neighborhood The size of a primary building on a site, the size of the yard, as well as the architectural character of the building are defining characteristfcs of historic and conservatfon districts, and vary according to the neighborhood. This sectfon deals specifically with site, scale, structure locatfon, and architectural style standards unique to propertfes within certain Iowa City neighborhoods. Proposed projects on buildings within a neighborhood listed in this sectfon must meet the respectfve Neighborhood District Guidelines in addition to the other applicable standards of the Iowa City Preservation Handbook. The provisions of this sectfon will supersede provisions found elsewhere in the handbook if the provisions conflict. Longfellow Historic District Summit StreetHistoric DistrictGovernor-Lucas StreetConservation DistrictClark StreetConservation DistrictDearborn StreetConservation District 52 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Architectural Guidelines for New Primary Structures Building Styles Architectural style is a defining characteristfc for historic and conservatfon districts. A new primary structure must reflect the historic styles of its neighborhood. Although new constructfon may adapt and mix some elements of different styles, a single style must dictate the height and mass, rooflines, fenestratfon, and overhangs for the new building. Please refer to sectfon 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City for examples of historic building styles. The architectural styles represented in each district are given below. In the Summit Street Historic District only: A new building must reflect the Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, American Foursquare, Prairie School, Vernacular, or Eclectic style. In the Longfellow Historic District only: A new building must reflect the Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Craftsman, Craftsman Bungalow, American Foursquare, Prairie School, Period Revival Cottage, Vernacular, or Eclectic style. In the Governor-Lucas Street Conservation District only: A new building on Governor Street must reflect the Italianate, Queen Anne, American Foursquare, or Vernacular style. A new building on Lucas Street must reflect the Queen Anne, Craftsman, Craftsman Bungalow, American Foursquare, Prairie School, or Vernacular style. In the Clark Street Conservation District only: A new building must reflect the Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Craftsman, Craftsman Bungalow, American Foursquare, Vernacular, or Eclectic style. In the Dearborn Street Conservation District only: A new building must reflect the Craftsman, Craftsman Bungalow, American Foursquare, Vernacular, or Eclectic style. In the Moffitt Cottage National Register Historic District only: A new building must reflect the Period Revival Cottage style. Building Height and Mass New structures must be one, one-and-a-half, or two stories in height except as noted below. In the Summit Street Historic District only: New single-family houses must have two full stories in the principal portfon of the building. In the Moffitt Cottage National Register Historic District only: New single-family houses must be one story in height. Porches In the Moffitt Cottage National Register Historic District only: Traditfonal front porches were not used in this district and are not permitted Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. 53 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines The College Hill Neighborhood District Guidelines apply to the College Green Historic District, East College Street Historic District, and the College Hill Conservatfon District. They apply to single-family, duplex and multf-family buildings in these neighborhood districts. Proposed new multf-family buildings must also comply with 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings. Site and Scale Guidelines Building Facade The total surface area of the street elevatfon of a new primary structure must be no more than 1200 square feet. Existfng primary structures that were historically single-family houses must not be expanded in such a manner that the total surface area exceeds 1200 square feet. For the purposes of enforcing this guideline, the total surface area of the street elevatfon is defined as a figure derived by calculatfng the surface area of all wall and roof surfaces, including window and door openings that are visible in a measured drawing of the building’s street elevatfon. Architectural Guidelines for New Primary Structures Building Styles Architectural style is a defining characteristfc for historic and conservatfon districts. A new primary structure must reflect the historic styles of its neighborhood. Although new constructfon may adapt and mix some elements of different styles, a single style should dictate the height and mass, rooflines, fenestratfon, and overhangs for the new building. Please refer to sectfon 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City for examples of historic building styles. In the College Hill Neighborhood: A new building must reflect the Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Craftsman, American Foursquare, Prairie School, Period Revival House, Vernacular or Eclectic style. Building Height and Mass New single-family houses or duplexes must be one-and-a-half, or two stories in height, except as noted below. New multf-family structures must be compatfble in height and mass with the surrounding neighborhood. On College Street only: New structures must be two stories in height. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. 8.2 College Hill Neighborhood College Green Historic District East College StreetHistoric District College Hill Conservation District 54 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook These guidelines apply to single-family, duplex and multf-family buildings in the Woodlawn Historic District. Proposed new multf-family buildings must also comply with 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings. Site and Scale Guidelines Due to the unique site characteristfcs of this district, standard Site and Scale Guidelines are difficult to apply. Therefore, the Historic Preservatfon Commission will use sectfon 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation for these guidelines. Architectural Guidelines for New Primary Structures Building Styles Although it is unlikely that a new primary structure will be constructed in the Woodlawn Historic District, in the event that this should happen, projects will be evaluated using sectfon 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation. Please refer to sectfon 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City for examples of historic building styles. In the Woodlawn Historic District: A new building must reflect the Gothic Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, Stick/ Eastlake, Tudor Revival or Eclectic style. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. 8.3 Woodlawn Historic District Woodlawn Historic Distrct 55 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines The Northside Neighborhood District Guidelines apply to the Brown Street Historic District, Northside Historic District, Goosetown/ Horace Mann Conservatfon District, and the Jefferson Street Historic District. They apply to single-family, duplex and multf-family buildings in these neighborhood districts. Proposed new multf-family buildings must also comply with 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings. Site and Scale Guidelines Building Facade The total surface area of the street elevatfon of a new primary structure must be no more than 1200 square feet. Existfng primary structures that were historically single-family houses must not be expanded in such a manner that the total surface area exceeds 1200 square feet. For the purposes of enforcing this guideline, the total surface area of the street elevatfon is defined as a figure derived by calculatfng the surface area of all wall and roof surfaces, including window and door openings that are visible in a measured drawing of the building’s street elevatfon. On Bella Vista Drive only: Due to the unique site characteristfcs of this area, standard Site and Scale Guidelines are difficult to apply. Therefore, the Historic Preservatfon Commission will use sectfon 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation for these guidelines. Architectural Guidelines for New Primary Structures Building Styles Architectural style is a defining characteristfc for historic and conservatfon districts. A new primary structure must reflect the historic styles of its neighborhood. Although new constructfon may adapt and mix some elements of different styles, a single style should dictate the height and mass, rooflines, fenestratfon, and overhangs for the new building. Please refer to sectfon 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City for examples of historic building styles. In the Northside Neighborhood: A new building must reflect the Greek Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, Craftsman, American Foursquare, Prairie School, Vernacular, or Eclectic style. Building Height and Mass New structures must be one-and-a-half or two stories in height. Exception In order to provide flexibility for certain changes and certain propertfes, the Commission has documented a number of exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines. Projects requiring the exceptfons corresponding to the property type listed below may be approved by the Preservatfon Planner or Preservatfon Planner and Chair. Projects requiring exceptfons to the guidelines that are not listed may be considered by the full Commission under major review. The Commission is afforded flexibility when reviewing applicatfons in order to arrive at historically and architecturally appropriate solutfons in cases where a proposed constructfon project does not significantly affect the architectural character of a historic structure. In deciding on a project requiring an exceptfon to the guidelines, the Commission may find guidance in the additfonal guidelines, outlined in sectfon 3.2. When approving a project requiring an exceptfon, the Commission shall identffy the guideline(s) for which the exceptfon is being made, and the ratfonale for the exceptfon. For more informatfon on exceptfons to the Iowa City Guidelines, please refer to sectfon 3.2. 8.4 Northside Neighborhood 569.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Building Access, Entrances and Orientation Buildings must have at least one door on the exterior of the building that provides pedestrian access to dwelling units within the building. A pedestrian circulatfon system must be provided that connects residentfal entrances to adjacent public rights-of-way, and to parking areas and other on-site facilitfes. Guidelines for disability access can be found in 5.2 Ramps and Decks. The “front” of the building must have at least one main entrance to the building, or may contain separate main entrances to the ground level dwelling units. Main entrances to a building require certain architectural treatments which emphasize the entrance. These can be found in 9.2 Architectural Elements. Orientatfon of the “front” of the building must be to the street or interior courtyard in a manner similar to existfng buildings in the neighborhood Lighting All exterior lightfng, including balcony and porch lightfng, must be carefully placed, downcast and shielded so that entrances, sidewalks and stairways are well lit, but the lightfng is non-obtrusive to neighboring propertfes. No exterior light source should be located on poles more than 15 feet high. When lights mounted on buildings are intended to provide site lightfng rather than corridor or exit lightfng, they must be mounted no higher than 15 feet. For requirements on the use of lightfng to highlight architectural elements, see 9.2 Architectural Elements. Parking and Garages Parking lots, including detached garages and carports, must not be located between the principle building and the street. Parking must be located behind a building, below grade, or under a building. On corner lots parking may be located alongside the building, but not within a required front or side yard and no closer than 20 feet to the sidewalk. Landscaped screening consistfng of densely planted evergreen shrubs, a hedge, a combinatfon of evergreen and deciduous shrubs, or a decoratfve masonry wall in combinatfon with landscaping must be used to screen the parking from the street and adjacent propertfes. Where parking is located below a building, any exposed portfons of the exterior walls of the parking area visible from a street must appear to be a component of the facade of the building. The use of similar building materials, window openings, and providing facade detailing similar to the upper levels are examples of how this can be achieved. In no case shall a building have the appearance from the street of being elevated above a parking level, or “on stflts.” When parking is provided within the primary structure, garage doors should not be located on any side of a building facing a street. When located on a side wall or on a rear wall on a corner lot, landscaping, masonry walls, or elements of the building should be used to help screen the garage doors from view from the street. Setback, Front (Continued on page 57) 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multi-Family Buildings 9.1 Site Elements Compliance with 14-2B-6 Multf-Family Site Development Standards of the Iowa City Zoning Code must be demonstrated prior to the issuance of a Certfficate of Appropriateness. The standards of this sectfon will be administered by the Historic Preservatfon Commission concurrently with review of the proposed development as defined in 14-2B-6 Multf-Family Site Development Standards. The provisions of this sectfon will supersede the provisions of 14-2B-6 Multf-Family Site Development Standards if the provisions conflict. New structures must also meet the provisions of 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines. Please be advised building permit requirements are unique for multf-family structures. Please contact the Building Department at 356-5120 before beginning work to inquire about your property. AcceptableUnacceptable S2 screening S2 screening Acceptable Acceptable Location of surface parking for properties with a single building 57 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings Architectural Details The building should include architectural details to add interest to building elevatfons visible from the public street, including but not limited to the following: Quoins, dentfls, cornice moldings, brackets, arches, corner boards, keystones, decoratfve lintels and sills, double-hung windows, soldier courses, belt courses, bay windows, and other decoratfve features as appropriate for the design of the overall building and materials being used. The use of these elements must be reviewed in the context of the overall building design and the character of the historic district, and not simply based on the provision of these architectural details. Architectural Style The purpose of requiring an architectural style is to ensure that the mass, roof form, window style and configuratfon, and the basic architectural details of a building are generally compatfble with the historic character of the historic or conservatfon district. New buildings should appear similar to a large house or a small historic apartment building. Any building elevatfon that is within public view (visible from a public street, public sidewalk, public access easement, or other public way, or from a public park or other public open space area.), must be designed in a manner that is consistent with a historic architectural style typical of residentfal buildings in the historic and conservatfon districts. However, building facades that are visible only from public alleys are not subject to these standards. The applicable architectural styles are outlined in 8.0 Neighborhood District Guidelines, and include: Italianate; Queen Anne; Colonial Revival; Craftsman; Craftsman Bungalow; American Foursquare; Prairie School; Period Revival; and Eclectfc. The applicant must indicate in detail how each of the following architectural elements in the proposed building are consistent with one of these architectural styles as described in 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City: 1.Form and mass of the building; 2.Roof configuratfon and pitch; 3.Style and placement of windows and doors; 4.Window and door trim, eave boards, frieze boards, and other trim; 5.Porch and entrance features; 6.Building details and ornamentatfon. Alternatfve designs that have been prepared by a licensed architect may be acceptable and will be reviewed on a case-by case basis. (Continued on page 58) 9.2 Architectural Elements Acceptable UnacceptableAcceptable Location of surface parking for properties with multiple buildings Frieze board Corner board Window trim Masonry base Building Materials The front yard setback must comply with the setback requirements established within the appropriate individual district guidelines. If no setback requirement is established within the district guidelines, the following standard must apply. The front setback for new buildings must not deviate more than 5 feet from the average setback of existfng principal buildings along the same frontage. Alternatfvely, for frontages that contain more than six lots, the average may be calculated based on the principal building setbacks on the four closest lots along the same frontage to the lot containing the new building. However, in no instance shall a new building may not be located closer to the street than the existfng principal building that is closest to the street along the same frontage. 589.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Balconies, Decks, Exterior Stairways, Corridors Lifts and Ramps Balconies, decks, exterior stairways, corridors, lifts and ramps should be designed so that they are integrated into the overall design of the building. Methods of integratfng these elements into the building design may include, but are not limited to, fully or partfally recessing them into the facade of the building, placing them under a roof that is integrated into the overall roof plan, utflizing supports that are compatfble with the rest of the building in terms of materials and design, and utflizing supports that reach to the ground rather than append on the exterior of the building. For purposes of this subsectfon the term, “exterior stairways,” refers to stairways that lead to floors of a building that are above the first or ground-level floor of a building. “Exterior corridors refers to unenclosed corridors located above the first or ground-level floor of a building. Balconies and exterior stairways, exterior corridors and exterior lifts must comply with the following standards: 1.Exterior stairways, exterior lifts and exterior corridors must be covered with a roof similar in design and materials to the roof over the rest of the structure. Said roof should be incorporated into the overall roof plan of the structure. Alternatfvely, such features may be recessed into the façade of the building. Exterior corridors may not be located on a street-facing wall of the building or within 20 feet of a street -facing wall. 2.Unenclosed or partfally enclosed stairways may not be used as the primary means of access to dwelling units located above the ground-level floor of the building (see 14-2B-6D-6 of the Iowa City Zoning Code). 3.Balconies, exterior stairways, exterior lifts and exterior corridors may not be located on any side of a building that is adjacent to a property that is zoned Single Family Residentfal or that contains an existfng Single Family Use. Buildings that are set back at least 40 feet from any such property are exempt from this standard. 4.The design of any balcony, exterior stairway, exterior lift or exterior corridor must utflize columns, piers, supports, walls, and railings that are designed and constructed of materials that are similar or complementary to the design and materials used for the rest of the building. 5.Decks and ramps should be designed according to the guidelines set out in sectfon 5.2 Decks and Ramps. Unacceptable Acceptable Acceptable Balconies and exterior corridors Building Height and Mass Measures should be incorporated into the design of a new building that help to reduce its “visual mass” and overall height. In historic and conservatfon districts the width of the front façade of new buildings must not exceed 40 feet unless the horizontal plane of any street-facing façade of the building is broken into modules that give the appearance of smaller, individual buildings. Each module must meet the following standards: 1.Each module must be no greater than 30 feet and no less than 10 feet in width and must be distfnguished from adjacent modules by a variatfon in the wall plane of at least 16 inches in depth. For buildings that are 3 or more stories in height, the width of the module may be increased to 40 feet. 2.Each module must have a corresponding change in the roofline. 3.Each module must be distfnguished from the adjacent module by at least one of the following means: a)Variatfon in Material colors, types or textures; b)Variatfon in the building and/or parapet height; (Continued on page 59) 59 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings Lights intended to architecturally highlight a building or its features must use a limited pattern of light that does not extend beyond the wall of the building. Roofline (Continued on page 60) windows, pilasters and pediment, or other significant architectural treatments that emphasize main entrances. Lighting c)Variatfon in the architectural details such as decoratfve banding, reveals, stone, or tfle accents; d)Variatfon in window pattern. e)Variatfon in the use of balconies and recesses. Entrances Main entrances to a building, including main entrances to ground level individual dwelling units must be clearly demarcated by one of the following means: covered porch or canopy, transom and sidelight b. Transom & sidelight windows a. Canopy a. Porch c. Pilasters & pediment Main entrance features Unacceptable Acceptable Acceptable Acceptable Building articulation Module Module New MF Building Existing ModuleModule Existing Building modules that break up the horizontal plane 60 9.0 Design Guidelines for Multf-Family Buildings Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Rooflines should reflect the predominant roof type, orientatfon, scale and pitch of existfng buildings within the neighborhood. Windows/Fenestration The placement of windows and doors on street elevatfons should be consistent with the window and door patterns found on other propertfes in the surrounding neighborhood, and of a similar size, scale and proportfon to the windows of other buildings in the neighborhood. Individual window units that are located in primary living spaces, such as living rooms, dining areas, and bedrooms, must have a height that is at least 1.5 tfmes greater than the width of the window unit. Individual window units may be located side-by-side in a wider window opening. Bathroom, kitchen, skylights, and decoratfve windows, such as stained-glass and ocular windows, are not required to meet this standard. The use of trim and moldings must be similar in width and character to surrounding buildings. width 1.5 X widthWindow proportions 61 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitatfon The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation (Standards) were originally written to determine the appropriateness of proposed project work on propertfes that were listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places. The Standards are accompanied by instructfons concerning methods, materials, historical character, and other consideratfons that relate to the historical significance of the partfcular property and its surroundings. The Standards have been widely accepted by state, county, and city governments. The Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Commission uses the Standards to determine the appropriateness of exterior changes to historic landmarks and propertfes located in historic and conservatfon districts. The Iowa City Guidelines are based on and comply with the Standards, and were written to provide more specific guidance for owners, contractors and consultants in Iowa City as well as the Historic Preservatfon Commission. The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation (1990) are listed below. 1. A property shall be used for its historic purpose or be placed in a new use that requires minimal change to the defining characteristfcs of the building and its site and environment. 2. The historic character of a property shall be retained and preserved. The removal of historic materials or alteratfon of features and spaces that characterize a property shall be avoided. 3. Each property shall be recognized as a physical record of its tfme, place, and use. Changes that create a false sense of historical development, such as adding conjectural features or architectural elements from other buildings, shall not be undertaken. 4. Most propertfes change over tfme; those changes that have acquired historic significance in their own right shall be retained and preserved. 5. Distfnctfve features, finishes, and constructfon techniques or examples of craftsmanship that characterize a property shall be preserved. 6. Deteriorated historic features shall be repaired rather than replaced. Where the severity of deterioratfon requires replacement of a distfnctfve feature, the new feature shall match the old in design, color, texture, and other visual qualitfes and, where possible, materials. Replacement of missing features shall be substantfated by documentary, physical, or pictorial evidence. 7. Chemical or physical treatments, such as sandblastfng, that cause damage to historic materials shall not be used. The surface cleaning of structures, if appropriate, shall be undertaken using the gentlest means possible. 8. Significant archeological resources affected by a project shall be protected and preserved. If such resources must be disturbed, mitfgatfon measures shall be undertaken. 9. New additfons, exterior alteratfons, or related new constructfon shall not destroy historic materials that characterize the property. The new work shall be differentfated from the old and shall be compatfble with the massing, size, scale, and architectural features to protect the historic integrity of the property and its environment. 10. New additfons and adjacent or related new constructfon shall be undertaken in such a manner that if removed in the future, the essentfal form and integrity of the historic property and its environment would be unimpaired. 10.0 The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation 62 11.0 Title 14: Iowa City Zoning Code Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook The Iowa City Zoning Code is a document to ensure proper implementatfon of the Comprehensive Plan for the city of Iowa City. All development, including work on historic structures, must comply with the rules and regulatfons set out in the Zoning Code. Certain procedures, standards, regulatfons, guidelines, incentfves, definitfons, and noncompliance violatfons exist for historic preservatfon. The sectfons of the Zoning Code below detail the preponderance of administratfve procedures and rules which relate to projects involving historic structures. The Zoning Code may be found at http://www.icgov.org/zoning, or may be viewed or purchased from the Department of Planning and Community Development. Multi-Family Site Development Standards Chapter 2, Artfcle B, Sectfon 6 of the Iowa City Zoning Code deals with the requirements of multf-family structures and the requisite parking and driveway requirements, architectural styling, building materials and minor modificatfons to existfng structures. Historic District Overlay Zone Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 1 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the purpose of an overlay zone, defines an overlay zone as well as a historic district, provides maps of Iowa City historic districts and lists designated local historic landmarks. Conservation District Overlay Zone Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 2 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the purpose of an overlay zone, defines an overlay zone as well as a conservatfon district, and provides maps of Iowa City conservatfon districts. Historic Review Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 3 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the purpose of the historic review, when a historic review is required, the applicatfon process, and appealing historic review decisions. Certificate of Economic Hardship Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 4 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the preconditfons for applicatfon of a Certfficate of Economic Hardship and the approval criteria. Compliance with Certificate Required Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 5 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses violatfons of work authorized by permits and penaltfes for violatfng the parameters of work authorized. Remedy of Dangerous Conditions Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 6 of the Iowa City Zoning Code grants the Historic Preservatfon Committee a chance to provide input into the remedy of historic structures deemed to be dangerous to life, health, or property. Prevention of Demolition by Neglect Chapter 3, Artfcle B, Sectfon 7 of the Iowa City Zoning Code mandates property owners maintain buildings against deterioratfon, decay, structural defects and provides for penaltfes in the case of violatfon. Historic Preservation Commission Chapter 7, Artfcle A, Sectfon 3 of the Iowa City Zoning Code determines the makeup of the membership of the Historic Preservatfon Commission. It further elaborates the purpose, powers and dutfes of the Commission, and provides for the establishment of the Design Review Subcommittee. 11.0 Title 14: Iowa City Zoning Code 11.1 Chapter 2, Article B – Multi-Family Residential Zones 11.2 Chapter 3, Article B – Historic District and Conservation District Overlay 11.3 Chapter 7, Article A – Boards and Commissions 63 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 11.0 Title 14: Iowa City Zoning Code Designation of Historic Districts, Conservation Districts, and Local Historic Landmarks Chapter 8, Artfcle E, Sectfon 1 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the procedures for designatfon of historic districts, conservatfon districts, and local historic landmarks including applicatfon requirements and provisions for public hearings. Historic Review Chapter 8, Artfcle E, Sectfon 2 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the applicatfon requirements for a Historic Review, the various levels of review, and the approval and appeals procedure. Certificate of Economic Hardship Chapter 8, Artfcle E, Sectfon 3 of the Iowa City Zoning Code discusses the circumstances which qualify for a Certfficate of Economic Hardship, the applicatfon requirements and the approval procedure. 11.4 Chapter 8, Article E – Historic Preservation Commission Approval Procedures This sectfon of the code provides definitfons to terms used throughout the code and which refer to historic preservatfon. 11.5 Chapter 9, Article B – Historic Preservation Definitions 64 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook The American Foursquare style is typified by its cubical mass and hipped roof. Roof pitches vary from 6/12 to 10/12. Often, the roof pitch at the eave will be less than the pitch of the main roof forming a “sweep” at the roof edge. Overhangs are often 24 inches or more with boxed-in soffits and a wide frieze board. Foursquare houses have hipped, wide attic dormers on one or more sides. Windows tend to have wider proportfons than other styles, but they are stfll taller than they are wide. Although not always strictly symmetrical, the front facade is very regular. Ornamentatfon is typically simple and is usually expressed in the design of the porch. There may be two types of siding used, similar to a Craftsman house. Foursquare porches typically extend the entfre width of the front facade and have a low-pitched hip roof. The porch may have two or three large, square columns on masonry piers to support the roof. Other Foursquare porches have Classic Revival style details with round tapered columns. The porch railing may be constructed of solid panels, rails with square spindles, or a solid wall covered with the siding material. The American Foursquare originated as a design for single family residences with four rooms on each of two floors. However, it may be adapted for multf- family buildings. The square plan may be elongated or designed as two attached houses to form a duplex. 12.0 Residential Architectural Styles of Iowa City 12.1 American Foursquare The following is a guide to the most typical architectural styles found in Iowa City’s historic and conservatfon districts. Building styles are characterized by the mass and proportfons of the building, the style and placement of windows and doors (fenestratfon), and style of trim and other ornamentatfon. New constructfon in historic and conservatfon districts should reflect the size, proportfons, fenestratfon, trim, and other ornamentatfon of a building style typical of that district. These guidelines will be used in evaluatfng new single-family houses and multf-family buildings. Typical American Foursquare house Foursquare duplex Large Foursquare house with Classic Revival details 65 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Buildings designed in the Colonial Revival style are distfnctfve for the formal, often symmetrical arrangement of the facade and plan. The plan is typically rectangular, though it may have rear or side wings. The simple side-gable roof has a pitch between 8/12 and 12/12 and frequently has small dormers that are symmetrically placed. Dutch Colonial Revival style houses have a gambrel roof with shed dormers at the front and rear of the house. Colonial Revival buildings have boxed eaves and they have a wide frieze board beneath the eave. More elaborate buildings will also have dentfls at the frieze. Ornamentatfon is limited to simple classical columns at the porch and shutters. The width of the two shutters at a window should equal the width of the window opening to give the appearance that they are operable. Colonial Revival porches are small portfcos. The facade is arranged symmetrically with the portfco and entrance door at the center. However, large multf- family buildings may have a two-story porch. The porch roof is a simple gable supported by round classical columns. The columns should taper and each column should have a capital and base. Some Colonial Revival buildings have no porches, but will at least have an ornamental door surround with pilasters at the entry. Single-family houses are 1-1/2 stories to 2-1/2 stories in height. Multf-family buildings may be up to 3-1/2 stories. 12.2 Colonial Revival Modest 1 1/2 story Colonial Revival house Dutch Colonial Revival house Multi-family Colonial Revival building 66 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook In Iowa City, Craftsman style houses are two stories with a simple rectangular floor plan. Roof pitches are low, and range from 5/12 to 8/12 with 18 to 24 inch overhangs. The soffits are open, leaving the rafter tails exposed. The siding material often changes between the first and second story. A wide band board or brick soldier course will delineate the change in materials. A water table and band board is located at the top of the foundatfon wall. Other ornamentatfon is relatfvely sim- ple, with square wood brackets, upper sash divided lights, and square porch columns. Craftsman porches may be small and only wide enough to provide a covered entry, or they may be the full width of the house. Porch railings are typically wood panels, solid with siding on either side or brick, or they may have rails with square spindles. Porch or- namentatfon is similar to that on the main house. The Craftsman style has also been used for apartment buildings, though there are few examples of such building in Iowa City. Craftsman apartment buildings are typically 3-4 stories and have a symmetrical plan. They may be U-shaped or the entry may be centrally located and flanked by vertfcal bays. Apartment build- ings are usually all brick, or brick and stucco. 12.3 Craftsman Front-gabled Craftsman house with wall shingles Side-gabled Craftsman house Large Craftsman house 67 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Bungalows are a subset of the Craftsman style. Although the two styles display similar materials and ornamentatfon, Bungalows are only one or 1-1/2 stories in height. The massing may be quite simple with a rectangular plan, or more complex with wall projects, bays and dormers. Like the Craftsman house, they have square columns, brackets, open eaves and a lower roof pitch. There also tend to be more variatfons of the Bungalow porch. The porch roof will often be integrated with the main roof and may extend the entfre width of the facade. Bungalows are used for single-family residences, though they may be connected at the side walls to form a duplex or series of townhouses. 12.4 Craftsman Bungalow Simple Craftsman Bungalow Side-gable brick Craftsman Bungalow Front-gable duplex Craftsman Bungalow 6812.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.5 Eclectic Eclectfc houses are characterized by the inclusion of two or more different styles in the same building. Most frequently, these styles occurred during the same tfme period, or the eclectfc house demonstrates the transitfon between two styles. Architectural characteristfcs of these houses may be influenced by two or more of the styles described previously in this sectfon. However, for new constructfon, it is best to use only two styles in an Eclectfc building with one style dominatfng. House with Queen Anne and Foursquare influence Duplex with Queen Anne and Foursquare influence Cottage with Period Revival & Craftsman influences 69 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City The Greek Revival Style is directly inspired by classical Greece architecture, such as the Parthenon. It is of the most popular and long -lived styles in America because it was thought to embody the ideals of democracy. A Greek Revival house ranges in appearance from a windowed Greek temple to that of a simple Colonial house with a massive columned porch over the front door. Architects of Greek Revival copied the Greek orders (columns including shafts, capitals, entablatures, and/or bases decorated per a specific classical order) and usually painted everything white to replicate the white marble finish of a Greek Temple. The windows are set back behind columns because they conflict with the desirable look of the Greek Temple. As the Greek Revival style gained acceptance, it was found that the easiest way of convertfng the basic colonial house into a Greek temple was to turn the gable end to the street and redesign the front entrance into it. The gable was then made into an impressive pediment which either remained flat or was extended to rest on a row of columns. Other characteristfcs of Greek Revival architecture include white pilasters, wooden pilaster trim work to simulate columns supportfng the pediment, delicately detailed front doors, white painted cedar clapboards, and a window in the pediment to light the attic. Because chimneys were not part of the design of a Greek temple, they were hidden as much as possible on Greek Revival homes. 12.6 Greek Revival House built with Greek Revival characteristics Historic home demonstrating Greek Revival influence 70 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook The Italianate building style emphasizes vertfcality. Often, Italianate buildings are two or three stories tall with each story having a ceiling height of at least ten feet. Plans are usually rectangular, T -shaped, or L- shaped. Italianate roofs are most commonly gabled with a hipped cornice return. The roof pitch is between 6/12 and 8/12. Distfnctfve of this style is the decoratfve cornice with intricate brackets beneath a wide overhang. Windows are narrow and tall, and first and second story windows are typically aligned and evenly spaced. Italianate buildings often have decoratfve bay windows and paired narrow windows in lieu of a wider single window. Window and door openings are often arched with decoratfve “hoods” and sills. Italianate porches are ornate, with chamfered square columns and decoratfve balustrades. The balustrades may have turned or square members placed horizontally as well as vertfcally. A geometric pattern may also be cut from flat one-inch boards to form the balustrade. Italianate porches often have decoratfve friezes composed of spindles just below the eaves. Porches often extend the entfre width of the front facade and may wrap around to the side. 12.7 Italianate Simple rectangular Italianate house Elaborate T-shaped Italianate house Large Italianate building 71 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Historic European architecture, such as Cotswold cottages, Tudor houses, French country houses, and Renaissance manor houses, provide the precedent for Period Revival cottages and houses. The architectural characteristfcs of Period Revival buildings are based on the architectural style emulated. The modest, picturesque cottages of Howard Moffitt are most evocatfve of English Cotswold cottages. Other cottages, as well as fraternity houses, are commonly based on English Tudor architecture. Period Revival cottages tend to have irregular plans, roof lines, and facades. Roof pitches vary from 8/12 to 16/12 or steeper. Houses with very steep gables are more evocatfve of Tudor cottages. The Period Revival style is distfnctfve more for the use of materials, massing and roofline than applied ornament. The cottages are usually 1-1/2 stories in height and the roof may be gabled or hipped with small dormers interruptfng the roofline. Most of the window openings are small, and sometfmes arched and have wood shutters that appear to be operable. They often have a stone or brick chimney protruding from the exterior wall. Period Revival cottages typically do not have porches. They have a brick or stone front stoop and a small entry vestfbule. Some cottages may have a simple bracketed canopy at the entry. Fraternity and sorority houses were typically constructed in the Period Revival style. Though significantly larger than cottages, the architectural characteristfcs of these houses are similar to those of the cottages described above. 12.8 Period Revival Cottages and Houses Tudor Revival cottage Moffitt Cottage Large Renaissance Revival sorority house 72 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.9 Prairie School Although historic buildings of the Prairie School style are not typical in Iowa City, new buildings could be constructed based on Prairie School designs. The Prai- rie School developed in the Midwest with Frank Lloyd Wright being its best known architect. In Iowa City, the Prairie School style may be combined with the Ameri- can Foursquare and Craftsman styles. Houses are char- acterized by hip roofs with pitches of 8/12 or less, and relatfvely simple rectangular massing. The eaves are deep to provide protectfon from the sun. The entranc- es may be located at the side of the house or porch. Large piers, often at the porch, are also characteristfc of this style. Windows may be double-hung or casement. Common- ly, multfple tall windows will be installed side-by-side with a mullion between each window. Although sever- al patterns of divided lights are possible, a typical di- vided light pattern is nine lights with the muntfn bars located only four to six inches from the sash. This cre- ates a large center light with small square lights at the corners. In the case of double-hung windows, only the top sash will have divided lights. Buildings influenced by the Prairie School are often stucco or brick with wood or brick banding. If sided with wood, wide board and batten siding is often used in lieu of traditfonal clapboard. At the upper story win- dow sills, there is frequently wood or brick banding and a change of materials above the banding. Although rare in Iowa City, apartment buildings influ- enced by the Prairie School are constructed of brick, stucco or a combinatfon of the two with ornamental banding. The roofs may be flat or hipped as described above. Entrances are often from a small courtyard. Stucco Prairie School house with side entrance Wood and Stucco Prairie School house Stucco and brick Prairie School apartment building 73 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Queen Anne buildings range from the great “painted ladies” to more modest homes of 1-1/2 stories. They have an asymmetrical building footprint with projectfons and intersectfng masses in the roofs and walls. Roof pitches are at least 12/12 and roofs may be hipped and/or gabled in a variety of combinatfons. The gables are emphasized with decoratfve wood shingles and ornate trim. Round turrets are common on the most elaborate Queen Anne houses. Facades frequently include a large picture window, slightly taller than wide, surmounted by a fixed pane of ornamental glass. Queen Anne porches are ornate, with turned or round columns, porch rails, and turned spindles in a variety of patterns. Porches are large and gracious, often wrapping around the house. Multf-family buildings in the Queen Anne style may appear as a large elaborate house or as a series of simpler houses connected at the side walls to form a duplex or series of townhouses. 12.10 Queen Anne Modest 1 1/2 story Queen Anne house Large elaborate Queen Anne house Simple Queen Anne duplex 74 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Vernacular buildings tend to be relatfvely small in size, reflectfng the modest means of their early occupants. Their massing is often simple and they are one to two stories in height. Many vernacular houses have no ornamentatfon. Other houses have modest ornamentatfon that is a simplified design of whatever “high” style may have been popular at the tfme the house was built. The high style may also influence the massing, roof pitch, porch design and fenestratfon of the vernacular house. 12.11 Vernacular Vernacular house with Queen Anne influence Stone and clapboard Vernacular house Vernacular apartment building with Period Revival influence 75 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 12.0 Residentfal Architectural Styles of Iowa City 76 13.0 Historic Landmarks, Propertfes and Districts Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 13.0 Historic Landmarks, Properties, and Districts *Historic review is only required for changes to propertfes listed as Iowa City landmarks or located within Historic or Conservatfon Districts. 13.1 Historic Landmarks Address Name Year Built Style Iowa City Landmark National Register Historic/ Conservation District 747 W. Benton St. Cyrus S. & Georginia Ranck House ca 1905 Late Queen Anne Aug-02 — — 518 Bowery St. Bowery Street Grocery 1856 Storefront Oct-12 Apr-14 — 228 Brown St. Arthur Hillyer Ford House 1908 Mission Revival — Apr-86 Brown Street H.D. 414 Brown St. Charles Berryhill House 1868 Italianate — May-79 Brown Street H.D. 529 Brown St. Bohumil Shimek House 1893 Queen Anne Vernacular — Dec-91 Brown Street H.D. Capitol St. & Iowa Ave. Old Capitol 1842 Greek Revival — May-72 — Capitol St. & Iowa Ave. Pentacrest 1902-24 Classic Revival — Mar-78 — 1030 Carroll St. Plum Grove 1844 Greek Revival — May-73 — 30 N. Clinton St. First Congregatfonal Church 1869 Gothic Revival Sep-96 Jun-73 Jefferson Street H.D. 417 S. Clinton St. Johnson County Courthouse 1901 Richardsonian Romanesque — Mar-75 — 125 E. College St. College Block Building 1883 Italianate Sep-96 Jul-73 — 307 E. College St. Carnegie Library 1903 Classic Revival Jul-01 — — 320 E. College St. Trinity Episcopal Church 1871 Gothic Revival Sep-96 Dec-74 — 906 E. College St. Thomas C. Carson House 1875 Second Empire Sep-96 Sep-82 College Green H.D. 935 E. College St. Linsay House 1893 Queen Anne Sep-96 Aug-77 College Hill C.D. 1142 E. Court St. Oakes-Wood House 1858 Italianate Sep-96 Apr-78 Longfellow H.D. 332 E. Davenport St. Emma J. Harvat House 1916 Classic Revival — May-00 Northside H.D. 515 E. Davenport St. Letovsky-Rohret House 1881 Greek Revival Sep-96 Apr-82 Goosetown/Mann C.D. 1415 E. Davenport St. Rose Hill 1849 Greek Revival Sep-96 Apr-92 — 111 S. Dubuque St. Franklin Printfng House 1856 Commercial Brick Sep-96 Apr-86 — 914 S. Dubuque St. Tate Arms 1880 Vernacular Sep-2014 — — 120 E. Fairchild St. Carriage House & Jackson -Swisher House 1877 Gothic Revival Sep-96 Nov-82 — 630 Fairchild St. F. X. Rittenmeyer (Burger) House ca 1875 Anglo- Italianate Sep-96 May-79 — 115 N. Gilbert St. William Bostfck House 1851 Greek Revival Sep-96 Mar-96 Jefferson Street H.D. 219 N. Gilbert St. Jacob Wentz House 1847 Greek Revival Sep-96 Aug-74 — 529 S. Gilbert St. Hawthorne Glove Factory 1905 Early 20th C. Industrial Apr-13 Sep-14 — 538 S. Gilbert St. C.D. Close House 1874 Italianate Sep-96 May-74 — 2460 S. Gilbert St. McCollister Farmstead 1864 Anglo- Italianate Sep-96 Oct-76 — 30 S. Governor St. Stevenson-Baker House 1882 Italianate May-03 — College Hill C.D. 411 S. Governor St. Bethel AME Church 1868 Vernacular — Sep-00 Governor-Lucas C.D. 611 N Governor St Isaac Wetherby House ca 1860 Vernacular — Mar-09 Goosetown/Horace Mann C.D. 77 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 13.0 Historic Landmarks, Propertfes and Districts Address Name Year Built Style Iowa City Landmark National Register Historic/ Conservation District 604 Iowa Ave. Windrem House ca 1850 Vernacular Sep-96 Sep-77 College Hill C.D. 726 Iowa Ave. Crum-Overholt House ca 1840 Greek Revival May-03 ---- College Hill C.D. 130 E. Jefferson St. Park House Hotel 1852 Greek Revival/ Late Victorian Sep-96 Dec-78 Jefferson Street H.D. 220 E. Jefferson St. St. Mary's Church and Rectory 1867 Gothic Revival Sep-96 Feb-80 Jefferson Street H.D. 610 E. Jefferson St. St. Mary's Rectory 1854 Greek Revival Sep-96 Jul-95 — 524 N. Johnson St. Czecho Slovakian Associatfon Hall 1900 Colonial Revival Sep-96 Nov-76 — 829 Kirkwood Ave. Clark House 1874 Victorian/ Italianate Sep-96 May-96 — 1101 Kirkwood Ave. Samuel Kirkwood House 1864 Anglo- Italianate Sep-96 Sep-74 — 119-123 N. Linn Economy Advertfsing Company 1923 Commercial Brick Sep-96 Apr-86 — 127-131 N. Linn & 221-227 E. Market Union Brewery 1856-57 Italianate Sep-96 Apr-86 — 203 N. Linn St.Union (Bashnagel) Bakery 1872 Commercial Brick June-14 — — 13 S. Linn St. Hohenshuh Mortuary 1917 Colonial Revival Oct-00 — — 28 S. Linn St. Old Post Office 1904 Classic Revival — Apr-79 — 410 N. Lucas St. Schindhelm--Drews House 1855 Greek Revival Sep-96 Jan-94 Goosetown/Horace Mann C.D. 20 E. Market St. North Presbyterian Church 1856 Romanesque Revival Sep-96 Aug-73 — 410 E. Market St. Henry C. Nicking House ca 1854 Vernacular Sep-96 Apr-75 — 108 McLean St. Sigma Pi Fraternity House 1900 Tudor Revival May-12 Dec-13 Melrose Ave, West of Hwy 218 Johnson County Asylum 1855 Vernacular — Aug-78 — 320 Melrose Ave. Wilbur D. and Hattie Cannon House 1884 Italianate Sep-96 Oct-94 — 503 Melrose Ave. A. W. Pratt House 1885 Italianate Sep-96 Feb-83 Melrose Avenue Natfonal H.D. 629 Melrose Ave. Billingsley-Hills House 1870 Italianate/ Greek Revival Sep-96 Jan-83 Melrose Avenue Natfonal H.D. 820 Park Rd. Ned Ashton House 1947 Modern Movement — Jan-01 — 200 E Park Rd City Park Cabins ca 1880 Log Cabin — Jun-13 — 704 Reno St. Cavanaugh-Zetek House 1870 Gothic Revival Sep-96 Sep-77 — 228 S. Summit St. Summit Apartment Building 1916 Prairie/ Sullivan Sep-96 Sep-83 College Hill C.D. 800 N. Van Buren St. Vogt-Unash House 1889 Queen Anne — Jul-78 Brown Street H.D. 207-215 E. Washington Paul--Helen Building 1910 Commercial Brick Sep-96 Apr-86 — 221 E. Washington St. Englert Theatre 1912 Renaissance Revival — Aug-01 — 332 E. Washington St. Boerner-Fry Company/ Davis Hotel 1899 Classic Revival — Jan-83 — 802 E. Washington St. Haddock House "The Crag" 1891 Gothic Revival May-03 — College Hill C.D. 109 Wright St.Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad Passenger Statfon 1898 Victorian Ec- lectfc Sep-96 Dec-82 — 78 13.0 Historic Landmarks, Propertfes and Districts Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 13.2 Historic and Conservation Districts Address Iowa City Local District Natfonal Register South Summit Street Historic District Roughly 300-800 blocks of South Summit Street Mar-84 Oct-73 Woodlawn Avenue Historic District Irregular pattern along Woodlawn Avenue Mar-84 Mar-79 Brown Street Historic District Roughly Brown Street from west of Linn Street to Governor Street and adjacent parts of inter- sectfng streets May-94 Sep-94 Moffitt Cottage Historic District 1322-1330 Muscatfne Avenue May-95 May-93 East College Street Historic District East College Street between South Summit Street and Muscatfne Avenue. Mar-97 Jul-97 College Green Historic District Roughly bounded by Burlington, Governor, Wash- ington, and Johnson Streets Mar-97 Jul-97 Governor-Lucas Conservatfon District Roughly bounded by Burlington, South Lucas, and South Governor Streets, and the Iowa Interstate Railway May-01 ---- Longfellow Historic District Roughly bounded by Court and Rundell Streets, Sheridan Avenue, and the west boundary of Longfellow School Jan-02 Sep-02 Clark Street Conservatfon District Roughly 400-800 blocks of Clark Street, and por- tfons of Roosevelt and Maggard Streets Jan-02 ---- Dearborn Street Conservatfon District Roughly bounded by Muscatfne Avenue, South 7th Avenue, Rundell Street, and the Iowa Inter- state Railway Jan-02 ---- College Hill Conservatfon District Roughly bounded by Iowa Avenue, Johnson and Burlington Streets, and Muscatfne Avenue May-03 ---- Longfellow-Moffitt Cottage Combinatfon Historic District Combines the previous, separate Longfellow and Moffitt Cottage Historic Districts Jun-03 ---- Brown Street Historic District (Increase) Roughly 500-800 blocks of East Ronalds Street Dec-04 Sep-04 Gilbert-Linn St. (Northside) Historic Dis- trict Portfons of 300-600 North Gilbert and North Linn Streets May-09 Apr-05 Jefferson Street Historic District Portfons of 100-400 blocks of East Jefferson Nov-12 Sep-04 Goosetown/ Horace Mann Conservatfon District Roughly bounded on the north by Ronalds, Gil- bert, Davenport, and Governor Streets. On the south by Jefferson, Dodge, and Governor Streets Jun-14 Sep-04 Melrose Historic District Portfons of Melrose Avenue, Melrose Court, Mel- rose Circle, Brookland Park Drive, Brookland Place, and Myrtle Avenue ---- Dec-04 79 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 14.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts Descriptfon and History 14.0 Historic and Conservation Districts Description and History Governor-Lucas Street Conservation District Turn-of-the-century houses and tree-lined streets characterize the Governor-Lucas Conservatfon District with houses datfng from the late 19th century through the 1930s. Governor Street’s unusually wide lots and deep set-backs on the east side create a sense of spaciousness that is similar to portfons of Summit Street and not found in most Iowa City residentfal districts. Examples of vernacular house forms and architectural styles from the 1860s through the 1930s are present, with many good examples of Craftsman Style, American Four-Squares and Bungalows intermixed with earlier Victorian styles. The Governor-Lucas Conservatfon District was Iowa City’s first conservatfon district. It includes 139 residentfal propertfes and one church, the Bethel AME Church (Natfonal Register). The neighborhood saw its transitfon to rental occupancy begin in 1961 when the majority of the district was rezoned for dense multffamily occupancy. In the wake of this rezoning, blocks to the west saw houses razed and new apartment buildings erected. Measures to designate the area for protectfon began with a reconnaissance survey of the neighborhood and blocks to the west completed in 1990. In 1996 and 1998, a smaller area was included in the intensive level survey completed for the Longfellow Neighborhood. In May 2000, owner-occupants and long-term renters, aware of the pressure to construct dormitory-style apartment buildings in the neighborhood, successfully petftfoned the City Council to down-zone the neighborhood. Work on establishment of a conservatfon district paralleled the rezoning measure. Summit Street Historic District The neighborhood’s three blocks include Iowa City’s best collectfon of well-preserved Victorian-era and turn-of-the-century American Revival style residences. Houses along the broad street are set well back on deep, wooded lots with many propertfes containing carriage houses, fences, carriage blocks, and historic landscaping features. The ambiance of the Summit Street Historic District is park-like. Constructfon dates for the district’s building stock primarily range from the 1860s-1910s. The Summit Street blocks were recognized through the years as having a sense of tfme and place. Individual houses were prominently featured in Margaret Keyes’ early book on Iowa City architecture. Early threats to the neighborhood posed by apartment house constructfon were thwarted by neighborhood actfvism and subsequent down zoning and historic district protectfon. In 1973, residents sought and received a designatfon for the area as a Natfonal Register historic district – the first historic district established in Iowa City. A decade later, the district was also the first to be listed as a local historic district, along with the Woodlawn Avenue Historic District. The health of Summit Street is evidence of the long term community benefits fostered by historic preservatfon. A neighborhood that was threatened with redevelopment in the 1960s is now a stable and well-regarded residentfal anchor for the near east part of the city. Buildings in the district have been rehabilitated at a rate commensurate with or ahead of other older neighborhoods in the city. Property values have kept pace with or exceeded appreciatfon in the balance of the community. Traffic increases are stfll perceived by current residents; and others, as the principal threat to the neighborhood. For many, the Summit Street Historic District is an example of the idiom “If it ain't broke, don't fix it!" The area has a well-recognized historic image in the community and the district’s addresses are sought after in spite of an increasingly competftfve market for preserved historic residences Clark Street Conservation District The Clark Street Conservatfon District includes residences constructed as worker housing for the nearby Kelly Manufacturing Company and Oakes Brickworks during the late 19th and early 20th centuries as well as homes built for what became an early 20th-century commuter suburb. Modest one- to two- story houses in styles and vernacular house forms typical of the period characterize the district. Scattered examples of earlier domestfc architectural styles and forms appear on the west edge adjacent to the Summit Street Historic District. Narrow, tree-lined streets contribute to the historic sense of tfme and place of this neighborhood. At the tfme the Clark Street Conservatfon District was designed in 2001, 57 of the district’s 76 propertfes, approximately 75 percent, were considered to be contributfng to the character of the conservatfon district. 14.1 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts 80 14.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts Descriptfon and History Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook College Hill Conservation District The district adjoins three historic districts – College Green, East College Street, and Woodlawn. The neighborhood takes its name from the topographic rise in the center of the area occupied by College Green Park and the ladies seminary that was once located in the park. The neighborhood includes a mix of single- family and multffamily residentfal buildings datfng from the late 19th through the early 20th century. The neighborhood traditfonally had a strong associatfon with the University, housing students in rooming houses, in scattered fraternity and sorority houses, and more recently, in apartment buildings. Private residences housed University faculty and staff as well as many business and civic leaders. Constructfon of apartment complexes and the unsympathetfc renovatfons of other buildings have diminished the appearance of some of the streetscapes. The College Hill Conservatfon District was evaluated in two separate surveys – the intensive level survey of the College Hill Neighborhood completed in 1994 and the reconnaissance level survey of Iowa Avenue in 2003. The district became a local conservatfon district in 2003. The College Hill Conservatfon District, partfcularly Iowa Avenue, was one of the most seriously damaged neighborhoods in the tornado of 2006. The repairs of damaged structures was reviewed by the Historic Preservatfon Commission to assure the long-term preservatfon of the neighborhood. These efforts were recognized by an Award for Hard Won Victories from the Iowa Chapter of the American Planning Associatfon. 14.2 College Hill Neighborhood Districts Longfellow Historic District The Longfellow Historic District includes portfons of the original Rundell Additfon, Oakes Additfon and East Iowa City. The northern fringe of the Longfellow neighborhood was developed before World War I while the balance of the area extending south of Court St. and east of Clark St. was not fully developed untfl World War II. Good examples of vernacular house forms and architectural styles from before and after World War II survive throughout the neighborhood, with constructfon occurring c. 1910 – 1940. Facing blocks have a homogeneous scale of buildings with uniform setbacks. The neighborhood has a high level of physical integrity, including many historic garages. The Longfellow Elementary School is an important landmark anchoring the neighborhood, which was originally conceived as a streetcar suburb. The former Moffitt Cottage district, combined with the Longfellow district in 2003, is made up of the group of five buildings in the 1300 block of Muscatfne Avenue. These are single-family, one or one-and-a-half story, stone-veneered buildings with Period House stylistfc forms and details in the English cottage variatfon. They were constructed in 1939 and 1940. Since 1992, major progress has been made on the preservatfon objectfves for the Longfellow Historic district. In 1996 and 1998, historical and architectural survey work was completed. Parallel designatfon tracks saw the Longfellow Historic District listed as a local ordinance district in early 2002 and on the Natfonal Register later the same year. The Moffitt Cottage district was combined with the Longfellow Historic District in 2003. Fears of residents expressed in 1992 regarding incompatfble exterior remodeling of pristfne bungalows and period cottages has been replaced by carefully planned historic rehabilitatfons. Removal of the district’s small period garages has been slowed, and where replacement buildings have been erected the design review has mitfgated their loss by requiring more compatfble design for new garages. The contfnuing loss of original garages is a challenge for the neighborhood. Dearborn Street Conservation District The Dearborn Street area developed primarily during the 1930s and post-World War II years. A number of the district’s houses are based on standardized small house plans popularized during the pre-World War II period. By this tfme the automobile was more common and many homes have small historic garages that are similar to the houses or are incorporated into the house structure. The area was surveyed in 1996. A number of the houses have been altered, diminishing the neighborhood’s architectural integrity and eligibility for designatfon as a historic district. At the tfme the Dearborn Street Conservatfon District was designated in 2002, 105 of the district’s 147 propertfes, approximately 75 percent, were considered to be contributfng to the character of the conservatfon district. 81 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 14.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts Descriptfon and History Woodlawn is an enclave of 14 well-preserved late 19th and early 20th century residences (c. 1880 – 1900). Cohesion, seclusion and contfnuity of form are the principal characteristfcs which make the Woodlawn Historic District significant in the architectural and natural landscape of Iowa City. This essentfally late 19th Century enclave of upper middle-class residentfal structures is distfnguished by its large lots, deep setbacks, and the presentatfon of prominent front gables, each with its own partfcular decoratfve details, to the narrow, unpaved oval of Woodlawn Avenue. “Governor’s Square” located southwest of Woodlawn, was originally planned as the locatfon for the governor’s residence. After the capital relocated to Des Moines in 1857, these plans were abandoned and Governor’s Square was replatted for house lots. In 1889 S.M. Clark’s Sub-division, which contains Woodlawn, was platted east of the terminus of Iowa Avenue. Beginning in the 1880s houses were built along Woodlawn Avenue’s spacious lots featuring Gothic Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, Stfck/Eastlake, and Tudor Revival styles. Through the years, a Woodlawn address, like that of South Summit Street, connoted prestfge. The Woodlawn Historic District was listed on the Natfonal Register in 1979 and became a local historic district in 1984. Several buildings and mature landscape elements on Woodlawn were seriously damaged in the April 2006 tornado. 14.3 Woodlawn Historic District College Green Historic District The College Green Historic District is a residentfal area in east Iowa City deriving its name from a square- block park known as College Green. Substantfal houses were built surrounding the park, their styles typical of house forms and designs from late 19th and early 20th century (c. 1860 – 1930s). The block where the green is located was the site for an unsuccessful effort to establish the “Iowa Female Collegiate Instftute” college in the 1850s and reverted to park use thereafter. College Green Park serves as a neighborhood focal point. The neighborhood has a strong associatfon with the development of the University with residences in the area having served as homes for faculty and staff as well as rooming houses. The College Green Historic District is a residentfal area in east Iowa City deriving its name from a square- block park known as College Green. It includes the residentfal neighborhood including houses which faces College Green and those structures in an area extending south and east of the green. The district enjoys a high degree of visual contfnuity through similar scale and massing (single family residentfal), age (1860s – 1930), and stylistfc influences (Nineteenth Century Revival Styles and early Twentfeth Century Styles)… The district retains its mature tree canopy. The College Green Historic District was one of two residentfal districts identffied in the historical and architectural survey of the College Hill Neighborhood completed in 1994. In 1997 the district became a local historic district, and a short tfme later was listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places The mature landscape elements which contributed to the identfty of the district in and around College Green Park were destroyed or damaged in the tornado of 2006 East College Street Historic District Substantfal houses were built along the street, primarily between 1880 and 1920, manifestfng the architectural styles and vernacular house popular in Iowa City during those decades. Queen Anne Revival, Craftsman and American Four-square house forms predominate in three-quarters of the district’s 28 buildings. Several propertfes in the district have historical associatfons with early business leaders, while others were faculty members at the University. The architectural styles, period of constructfon, similar lot setbacks and siding, along with the presence of a high canopy of mature trees unify the district. The East College Street Historic District was one of two districts identffied in the historical and architectural survey of the College Hill Neighborhood completed in 1994. In 1997 the district became a local historic district, and a short tfme later was listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places Several buildings and the mature landscape elements along East College Street which contributed to the identfty of the district were damaged in the tornado of 2006 but most in the district avoided serious destructfon. 82 14.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts Descriptfon and History Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Brown Street Historic District This Historic District is located along the north edge of Iowa City’s “North Side” neighborhood and is comprised of residences representatfve of architectural styles, house forms, decoratfve details, and materials used in Iowa City from c. 1850 - 1935. Brown Street residences range in size from small one and two-story gable cottages to medium sized Gabled-Ell Cottages and to large hipped-roofed, two-story Four- Squares and sprawling asymmetrical organic cottages. The district’s record of architectural styles, the densely landscaped private lawns, and the intact brick streets create a distfnct sense of place. This visual quality as well as the historic importance of Brown Street as an early transportatfon route and its associatfon with faculty and staff of the University all serves to create a distfnct neighborhood identfty and historic significance. Since the 1960s this area of Iowa City has been the subject of intense debate and neighborhood planning. During the 1980s, efforts were unsuccessful to designate a large mixed-use historic district in the North Side that included portfons of Brown Street. After completfon of the 1992 Historic Preservation Plan, the Historic Preservatfon Commission made its first priority the designatfon of Brown Street and portfons of adjacent side streets (Bella Vista, Linn, Gilbert, Van Buren, Johnson, Dodge and Governor) as a separate Natfonal Register and local ordinance historic district. These efforts were successfully completed with strong neighborhood support in 1994 following considerable debate, organizing, and promotfon efforts led by the Commission. In 2004, the district boundaries were expanded to include a sectfon of Ronalds Street. Changing housing trends and the appeal of older houses as single-family residences have demonstrated the capacity of North Side neighborhoods such as Brown Street to rejuvenate and prosper. Northside Historic District (Gilbert-Linn Street National Register District) The Northside Historic District, which includes the Gilbert-Linn Street Natfonal Register District, is locally significant because of its associatfon with an important era of populatfon growth and intense residentfal development in Iowa City’s North Side at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Iowa Citfans built private residences for their growing families while small-scale developers constructed housing to meet the demand of a brisk rental market during these decades. The Northside Historic District’s organic development followed this pattern of residentfal development. Additfonal significance is gained from the fact that the Northside Historic District represented a cross sectfon of middle and upper income households with prominent business and professional leaders living next door to middle income and working class families. Individuals who resided in this neighborhood highlight several important themes in the city’s history in the decades before and after the turn of the 20th century. Primary among these were the growing prosperity of Iowa City’s German-American and Czech- American communitfes and the growth in importance of the State University of Iowa. The constructfon of new houses, the brisk rental of existfng houses, and the infill constructfon pattern that produced a dense residentfal district from ca. 1895 through ca. 1925 testffy to the neighborhood’s significance. The Northside Historic District also exhibits a representatfve collectfon of the residentfal architectural styles and vernacular house forms that appeared in Iowa City neighborhoods from the 1860s through the 1930s. From modest Bohemian cottages to pattern book houses and elaborate multf-story mansions, the Northside Historic District reflects the architectural character and best local residentfal building practfces of the period. The District derives added architectural significance because of the large number of well- preserved residences designed by Iowa City’s most productfve early 20th century architect, O.H. Carpenter, between 1900 and 1918. The combinatfon of visual qualitfes and historical associatfons gives the Northside Historic District its distfnct identfty and significance. The boundaries of the Northside Historic District are larger than the boundaries of the Gilbert-Linn Street Natfonal Register District. This arose from the neighborhoods desire to protect a larger number of intact historic resources in the neighborhood. 14.4 Northside Neighborhood Districts 83 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 15.0 Historic and Conservatfon Districts (City wide map) Goosetown/ Horace Mann Historic District The Goosetown/ Horace Mann Conservatfon District includes portfons of the Northside Neighborhood surrounding Horace Mann School and the western portfon of Goosetown. This district contains some of the city’s oldest and most unique housing stock, and is part of the original 1839 plat of Iowa City. Goosetown is located in the northeast corner of the original town plat. It traditfonally stretched from Bloomington Street and the flood plain of Ralston Creek on the south, to Oakland Cemetery on the north. The western boundary of Goosetown developed in the latter half of the 19th century as a neighborhood of successive generatfons of Bohemian (Czecho-Slovakian) immigrants and their families. The Goosetown name comes from the practfce of Bohemian women and children herding flocks of geese from the residentfal area to vacant nearby pasture land each day for feeding. The historic houses of the Goosetown/Horace Mann Conservatfon District represent a variety of vernacular forms and popular architectural styles. Some of the neighborhood’s earliest examples of Italianate and Queen Anne Style dwellings are located here, datfng from the 1860’s. Many houses in the district are from the 1880s and have survived with their original appearances substantfally intact. These range from modest one-story Goosetown cottages to larger 2-story side-gabled I-houses, with many of these otherwise simple vernacular forms displaying elements of the Greek Revival style. A long traditfon of student housing exists in the neighborhood with many residences providing quarters for a single roomer or a full house of boarders. The growth of student enrollments after 1900 also made the neighborhood a likely candidate for redevelopment – smaller houses were razed or moved to make way for larger residences. Student housing needs soared in the 1960s and 1970s and the same factors which had made the Near North Side a convenient residentfal choice for University faculty and student boarders in 1900 made the area attractfve for development of apartment houses. This new housing took the form of four to twelve-unit buildings constructed of brick veneer with mansard roofs. Constructfon of these “mansard plexes” had declined by the late 1980s following passage of zoning changes making apartment constructfon more difficult in the Northside. Three propertfes within the conservatfon district have been listed on the NRHP. They are the Schindhelm- Drews House, 410 N. Lucas Street, the Letovsky-Rohret House, 515 E. Davenport Street, and the Issac Wetherby House, 611 N. Governor Street. Four other propertfes have been identffied as key propertfes and are eligible for listfng in the Natfonal Register. These propertfes include 728 Fairchild Street, 508 Church Street, the Joseph Cerny House located at 718 E. Davenport Street, and the Lewis and Anna Jiroski (Yavorsky) House located at 724 Bloomington Street. Jefferson Street Historic District The Jefferson Street Historic District is a linear neighborhood that extends along East Jefferson Street from Clinton to Van Buren streets. Propertfes facing the intersectfng streets of Dubuque, Linn, Gilbert, and Van Buren are also included within the district. The entfre district was a part of the original plat of Iowa City and includes a mix of instftutfonal buildings (religious and academic) and residentfal buildings that reflect its historical development along the edge of the downtown and the University campus. University-related resources include buildings originally used as a biological sciences classroom building, a medical school anatomy lecture hall, an isolatfon hospital, and sorority houses. Buildings used for religious purposes include four churches, a student center, a former convent, and a rectory. The balance of the district includes two large apartment buildings, a collectfon of medium- and large-sized single-family dwellings that date from the 1850s through the 1930s, and a variety of secondary structures erected during the early 20th century. The district contains a total of 38 primary resources with all but one considered contributfng. The instftutfonal and residentfal buildings in the Jefferson Street Historic District exhibit a variety of late 19th and early 20th century historic architectural styles including excellent examples of eleven distfnct styles. Greek Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne, Colonial Revival, and Craftsman style houses are scattered through the District with well-preserved instftutfonal buildings designed in the Gothic Revival, French Second Empire, Classical Revival, Romanesque Revival, Italian Renaissance Revival and a mix of the Collegiate Gothic and Tudor Revival. 84 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 15.0 Historic and Conservation Districts (Citywide map) 85 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 86 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 16.1 Governor-Lucas Street Conservation District 87 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 16.2 Summit Street Historic District 88 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.3 Clark Street Conservation District 89 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 16.4 Longfellow Historic District 90 16.0 Longfellow Neighborhood Districts (Maps) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 16.5 Dearborn Street Conservation District 91 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 17.0 College Hill Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 17.1 College Green Historic District 17.2 East College Street Historic District 17.0 College Hill Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 92 17.0 College Hill Neighborhood Districts (Maps) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 17.3 College Hill Conservation District 93 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 17.0 College Hill Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 9418.0 Woodlawn Historic District (Map) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 18.0 Woodlawn Historic District (Map) 93 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Map) 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Maps) 19.1 Northside Historic District 96 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Map) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 19.2 Brown Street Historic District 97 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Map) 98 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Map) Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 19.3 Goosetown/ Horace Mann Conservation District 99 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook 19.0 Northside Neighborhood Districts (Map) 19.4 Jefferson Street Historic District 100 Appendices Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Additfon: A structure that is attached to an existfng building and that increases the size of its footprint. Rooms, new porches, decks and ramps are examples of additfons. Alteratfon: A modificatfon to the exterior of a building that does not increase the building footprint. Certfficate of Appropriateness: The document that is evidence of approval by the Historic Preservatfon Commission of a proposal to make a change in appearance. A Certfficate of Appropriateness must be obtained before a Regulated Permit may be issued. Certfficate of No Material Effect: The document, issued in lieu of a Certfficate of Appropriateness, that signifies that the work contemplated in the applicatfon will have no effect on any significant features of a historic landmark, or property within a historic or conservatfon district. Change in appearance: Any alteratfon, additfon, demolitfon, new constructfon or other change that modifies the site of or exterior of a structure on a landmark property or a property located within a district. Conservatfon district: An area that contains abutting pieces of property under diverse ownership, the built portfons of which by majority are at least fifty (50) years old and which: 1. According to a historic resources survey, no more than sixty percent (60%) of the primary structures and/or sites are of a quality, integrity and conditfon that qualify as contributfng to a Natfonal Register of Historic Places multf property listfng; and 2. Represent the traditfonal character of Iowa City neighborhoods through architectural characteristfcs, building scale, building setback, and streetscape design; or 3.Exemplify a pattern of neighborhood settlement or development significant to the cultural history or traditfon of Iowa City; or 4. Represent a unique or unusual physical character that creates distfnctfveness. Contributfng property: A property within a district that is an integral part of the historic context and character of the district. Demolitfon: Any act or process that destroys a structure or building or any architecturally significant component of a structure or building. District: A historic district or conservatfon district. Exceptfon: A statement in the Iowa City Guidelines that allows for a less stringent applicatfon of a historic preservatfon guideline for specified propertfes, usually buildings that are within a conservatfon district, noncontributfng or non-historic. Exterior features: The architectural style, general design and arrangement of the exterior of a building, including the kind and texture of building material and the type and style of all windows, doors, light fixtures, trim and brackets, porches, chimneys, signs and other appurtenant fixtures. Highly visible from the street: A building, object or feature is “highly visible from the street” if it can be easily notfced or viewed from the street right-of-way. Such features are usually located within 20 feet of the street-facing facade of a primary building. Historic district: An area that does not exceed 160 acres in area, and contains abutting pieces of property under diverse ownership which: 1.Are significant to American and/or Iowa City history, architecture, archaeology and culture; or 2.Possess integrity of locatfon, design, setting, materials and workership; or 3.Are associated with events that have made a significant contributfon to the broad patterns of our history; or 4.Are associated with the lives of persons significant in our past; or Appendices A.1 Definitions 101 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Appendices 5.Embody the distfnctfve characteristfcs of a type, period, method of constructfon; represent the work of a master; possess high artfstfc values; represent a significant and distfnguishable entfty whose components may lack individual distfnctfon; or 6.Have yielded or may likely yield informatfon important in prehistory or history. Historic landmark: Any building, structure, object, archaeological site, area of land or element of landscape architecture with significance, importance or value consistent with the criteria contained in subsectfons one through six of the definitfon of “Historic District,” which has been designated as a historic landmark by the Iowa City City Council. Key property: A property that is individually eligible to be listed on, or is listed on the Natfonal Register of Historic Places, and/or is designated a historic landmark. A list of key propertfes is available from the Preservatfon Planner. Natfonal Register of Historic Places (NRHP): A list of U.S. places of significance in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering and culture on a natfonal, state, or local level and maintained by the U.S. Department of the Interior. Noncontributfng property: Any property within a district that is not listed as a contributfng property. Non-historic property: Any noncontributfng property within a district that was less than 50 years old at the tfme the district was designated and/or was not constructed during the district’s period of significance. Outbuilding: A building on a lot that is smaller than the primary building and typically located behind the primary building. Examples of outbuildings are garages, barns, garden sheds, greenhouses and gazebos. Primary building: The inhabited building on a lot that is normally the largest and faces the street. Most often a house is the primary building in historic and conservatfon districts. Property: The site features, buildings, landscaping, and other structures that are located within the property lines of a partfcular lot or parcel. Setback additfon: An additfon built behind the existfng structure, opposite the street facade, that has a setback of eight or more inches from the side walls and a roof that is no higher than the existfng roof. When viewed from the street, the additfon must be narrower and no taller than the existfng structure. Little or no part of the setback additfon is visible on the street elevatfon. Street elevatfon: All roof and wall surfaces that face the street. These would be depicted in an architectural drawing called a street “elevatfon.” Structure: Any man-made feature that has been constructed on a site or property. 102 Appendices Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Baluster: An upright member supportfng a railing or banister. Balustrade: A railing composed of a handrail supported by balusters. In exterior applicatfons, balustrades typically have a top and bottom rail. Band board: A contfnuous horizontal wood band on an exterior wall. Barge board: A wide ornamental fascia board hung from the eaves or in a gable. Belt course: A contfnuous horizontal masonry band on an exterior wall. Brackets: Supportfng members of wood, stone or metal often used for both decoratfve and structural purposed and generally found under projectfng features such as eaves, cornices, bay windows, and canopies. Canopy: A small projectfng roof structure that shelters an entrance. Casement window: A window that is hinged on one side and swings in or out to open. Clapboards: Wood siding of overlapping horizontal boards. Column: A slender vertfcal element that supports part of a building or structure. Corner boards: Vertfcal trim boards installed at the outside and inside corners of a wall covered with wood siding. Cornice: The projectfng moldings forming the top band of a wall, eave, or other element. Cornice return: The extension of a cornice in a new directfon, especially where the rake of a gable end returns horizontally a short distance. Dentfl: In the cornice of a classically detailed building, one of a series of small blocks that alternate with a blank space. Divided light: A window in which the glass is divided into several small panes with muntfn bars. The nomenclature for divided lights is the number of lights in the upper sash over the number of lights in the lower sash, e.g. 3/1. Double-hung window: A window with two sashes that slide past each other vertfcally. Eave: The part of a roof that projects beyond the wall below the roof. Facade: Any of the exterior faces of a building. Typically refers to the side that faces the street and has the main entrance. Fascia board: A finish board attached to the ends of roof rafter tails. Fenestratfon: The arrangement of doors and windows in a building facade. A.2 Architectural Terms Details of Classical Revival porch Eave Soffit Frieze board Columns Pier Balustrade Skirt board Skirtfng Details of Eclectfc brick house Frieze board Bracket Lintel Double-hung window Sill Belt Coarse Quoins 103 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Appendices Fish-scale: A pattern created by rows of shingles with curved bottoms. Frieze board: A flat board that is located on the vertfcal plane and directly below the soffit. Front-gabled: Refers to a building with a gabled roof in which the main entrance is located on the facade that has the sloping eaves and gable. Gable: The triangular upper portfon of a wall beneath a gabled roof. Gabled roof: A roof composed of two sloping planes that meet at a ridge. Gambrel roof: A roof composed of two sloping planes of different pitches on either side of a ridge; the lower plane is the steeper one. Hip roof: A roof with sloping planes on all sides that meet at a central ridge or point. Light: A pane of glass in a window or door. Lintel: A horizontal beam bridging a window or door opening to carry the weight of the wall above the opening. Mullion: The vertfcal dividing members between grouped windows. Muntfn bars: The vertfcal and horizontal strips or grid that separate the panes of glass in a window sash or door. Pier: The square or rectangular masonry or wood post projectfng less than a story above the ground that carries the weight of a structure down to the foundatfon. Pilaster: A shallow column that is mounted to a wall. Pediment: The triangular gable end of a classical building, or the same form used elsewhere. Portfco: A projectfng, classical style porch supported by columns. Quoin: A large, rectangular block of stone used to physically and aesthetfcally anchor an outside corner of a building. Rafter tail: The end of a roof rafter that is exposed when the eave is not enclosed. Rake: The sloped edge of a gabled roof. Rake board: A board installed at the gable end of a roof parallel to the roof slope. Sash: A wood or metal frame composed of rails and stfles into which glass window panes (lights) are set. Side-gabled: Refers to a building with a gable roof in which the main entrance is located on the facade that has the straight eaves and sloping roof. Sidelight: A window located next to a door. Hip roof and dormer Gambrel roof Details of Craftsman house Rake board Bracket Wall shingle Rafter tails Band board Clapboards Corner board Column Water table board Foundatfon 104 Appendices Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Sill: The bottom member of a window frame. Skirt board: The wide flat board installed below a porch or deck floor to conceal the floor structure. Skirtfng: The screen composed of lattice or slats within a rectangular frame, and installed between porch or deck piers. Soffit: The exposed and finished underside of a roof overhang. Transom: A small window located over a door or another window. Tuckpointfng: Refilling deteriorated mortar joints with fresh mortar. Water table: A molding or projectfng sloping shelf located at the bottom of a wall that is designed to divert runoff water away from the masonry foundatfon below it. Italianate house with gabled roof Cornice Frieze board Brackets Cornice return Gable of Queen Anne house Barge Board Fish-scale Band board Balustrade Entrance with portfco and Prairie- style divided lights Transom Sidelight Double-hung windows with wood storm windows Casing Muntfn bars Light Sash Mullion Sill 105 Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Handbook Appendices A.3 Historic Preservation Documents Feb 2008 Feb 2008 Feb 2010 Apr 2001 June 2000 June 1999 July 1998 Apr 1997 July 1996 July 1994 Jan 1994 Dec 2008 Jan 2003 Aug 2000 Nov 1996 Nov 1996 Nov 1996 Jan 1994 Sep 2001 Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Clarion Associates LLC Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Clarion Associates LLC Svendsen Tyler, Inc Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Molly Myers Naumann Tallgrass Historians Molly Myers Naumann Tallgrass Historians, Inc. Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Historic Preservatfon Commission Historic Preservatfon Commission Arborgast & Eckhardt Arborgast & Eckhardt Jan Nash Svendsen Tyler, Inc. Svendsen Tyler, Inc. National Register of Historic Places The Natfonal Register of Historic Places Registratfon Forms for historic landmarks and districts in Iowa City are available from the Preservatfon Planner in the Department of Planning and Community Development. Preservation Plan Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Plan Iowa City Historic Preservatfon Plan – Appendices Surveys and Evaluations of Iowa City Historic Neighborhoods Survey and Evaluatfon of the Manville Heights Neighborhood Survey and Evaluatfon of the Central Business District Survey and Evaluatfon of the Goosetown Neighborhood (Original Town Plat Phase III) Survey and Evaluatfon of the Original Town Plat Phase II Survey and Evaluatfon of the Longfellow Neighborhood I & II Survey and Evaluatfon of a Portfon of the Original Town Plat of Iowa City (Phase I) Survey and Evaluatfon of the Dubuque/Linn Street Corridor Survey and Evaluatfon of College Hill Neighborhood Brown Street Historic District Reconnaissance Surveys Reconnaissance Survey of the Manville Heights Neighborhood Reconnaissance Survey of Iowa Avenue in the College Hill Neighborhood Governor-Lucas Street Conservatfon District Site Informatfon Form Historic District Summaries East College Street Historic District College Green Historic District Moffitt Cottage Historic District Brown Street Historic District Feasibility Studies Montgomery-Butler House Feasibility Study Report