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Passenger Transportation Plan FY2022 PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN FISCAL YEARS 2022-2027 PREPARED BY METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION OF JOHNSON COUNTY MARCH 2021 2 Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) Passenger Transportation Development Plan 2022-2027 MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board: Terry Donahue, Chair Mayor, North Liberty Chris Hoffman North Liberty City Council John Thomas, Vice-Chair Iowa City City Council Mazahir Salih Iowa City City Council Laura Bergus Iowa City City Council Janice Weiner Iowa City City Council Susan Mims Iowa City City Council Pauline Taylor Iowa City City Council Laurie Goodrich Coralville City Council Meghann Foster Coralville City Council Royceann Porter Johnson County Board of Supervisors Rod Sullivan Johnson County Board of Supervisors Louise From Mayor, University Heights Erin Shane University of Iowa Steve Berner Mayor, Tiffin Cathy Cutler (non-voting) Iowa Department of Transportation Ruthina Malone (non-voting) Iowa City School Board MPOJC Transportation Planning Division Staff: Kent Ralston, Executive Director/Transportation Planner Emily Bothell, Senior Associate Transportation Planner Brad Neumann, Associate Transportation Planner Frank Waisath, Associate Transportation Planner Sarah Walz, Associate Transportation Planner MPOJC Transportation Technical Advisory Committee: Vicky Robrock Manager, Coralville Transit Dan Holderness City Engineer, City of Coralville Kelly Hayworth City Administrator, City of Coralville Darian Nagle-Gamm Director, Transportation Services, City of Iowa City Mark Rummel Associate Dir. Transportation Services, City of Iowa City Ron Knoche Director, Public Works, City of Iowa City Jason Havel City Engineer, City of Iowa City Scott Sovers Assistant City Engineer, City of Iowa City Ryan Rusnak Planning Director, City of North Liberty Louise From Mayor, City of University Heights Doug Boldt City Administrator, City of Tiffin Greg Parker Johnson County Engineer Tom Brase Director, Johnson County SEATS Brian McClatchey Manager, University of Iowa CAMBUS David Kieft University Business Manager, University of Iowa Cathy Cutler Transportation Planner, Iowa DOT Darla Hugaboom Federal Highway Administration, Ames Bob Oppliger MPOJC Regional Trails & Bicycling Committee Brock Grenis East Central Iowa Council of Governments 3 Table of Contents Section One: Introduction and Process Discussion .................................................. 4 Introduction ..................................................................................................... 4 Process ........................................................................................................... 4 Section Two: Inventory and Area Profile .................................................................. 7 Public Transportation Providers ....................................................................... 7 Human Services Providers .............................................................................. 10 Private Transportation Providers ..................................................................... 11 Performance Measures ................................................................................... 13 Area Profile/Population Demographics ............................................................ 13 Section Three: Coordination Issues ......................................................................... 18 Service Needs ................................................................................................. 18 Fleet Needs ..................................................................................................... 18 Facility Needs…………………………………………………. .............................. 18 Status of Priorities/Strategies……………………………………………………… 19 Other Recent Activities……………………………………………………… .......... 23 Section Four: Priorities and Strategies ..................................................................... 24 5 Year Priorities ............................................................................................... 24 Goals and Objectives ...................................................................................... 24 5310 Funds…………………………………………………………………………… 26 Section Five: Funding .............................................................................................. 27 Past Funding Summary/Funding Sources Sought ........................................... 27 5 Year Funding Program ................................................................................. 29 Attachments ............................................................................................................. 31 Attachment 1: Iowa City Area Transit Study Executive Summary Attachment 2: Passenger Rail Rider Survey Attachment 3: Johnson County SEATS Rider Survey Attachment 4: MPOJC Long-Range Transportation Plan Metro Transit Survey Fact Sheet Attachment 5: Citizen Transportation Committee Survey Attachment 6: PTP Meeting Agendas/Minutes Attachment 7: Transit Inventory Attachment 8: Summary Tables of FY2019 and FY2020 Transit Statistics Attachment 9: Transit Maps 4 Section One: Introduction and Process Discussion Introduction The Passenger Transportation Plan (PTP) is intended to coordinate planning efforts for several federal transportation funding programs while incorporating federal requirements for coordinated planning efforts for public, private and human service transportation providers, as well as address needs-based project justification. The PTP is required by the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) of Iowa’s eighteen Regional Planning Affiliations (RPAs) and nine Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), which includes the Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC). MPOJC provides planning and grant administration services to three fixed route transit providers in this urbanized area; Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and the University of Iowa Cambus. The PTP is included in the MPOJC transportation planning work program each year. The PTP covers a five-year period (at Iowa DOT’s request, the FY2015-2019 was extended through FY2021) and is intended to demonstrate where there are transportation needs that can be served by both Federal and State funding assistance programs. The Federal funding assistance utilized by the Iowa City Urbanized area includes Urbanized Area Formula Program funding (5307), Statewide Urban Capital funding (5339), Special Needs Formula funding (5310), Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) funding, and Iowa Clean Air Attainment Program (ICAAP) funding. The State of Iowa funding assistance includes State Transportation Assistance (STA) Formula funding and STA Coordinated Special Project funding. The MPOJC provides many administrative services to area transit providers as well as preparation of planning documents that are associated with federal funding programs. MPOJC took the lead in developing the PTP with a great deal of input from Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, University of Iowa Cambus, Johnson County SEATS, private transit providers, and local human service agencies within the Iowa City urbanized area. Process The planning process over the years has included a close working relationship with MPOJC, Johnson County and the cities within the urbanized area. There have been many public input opportunities throughout the urbanized area over the past seven years. Because of the regular input we receive, we can break down the planning process into three different categories; Past Planning Efforts, On-Going Planning Efforts, and Current Planning Efforts. Past Planning Efforts: • Surveys: o In 2020, Iowa City Transit completed a Comprehensive Operational Analysis of City of Iowa City Fixed Route Transit System - this study included a ridership survey and included Coralville Transit and University of Iowa Cambus. The executive summary is found in Attachment 1. o In 2020, MPOJC worked with the CRANDIC Railroad, the Iowa Department of Transportation, and HDR Consultants to complete the third phase of the Passenger Rail Study for service between Iowa City and North Liberty (the Executive Study can be found in Attachment 2) o In 2018, Johnson County SEATS conducted a rider survey regarding ADA paratransit service (Attachment 3) o In 2016, MPOJC, as part of their Long-Range Transportation Plan 2045 posted 6 surveys on its website that included general transportation, 5 passenger vehicle, transit, bicycle, pedestrian, and youth (Metro Transportation Survey Fact Sheet can be found in Attachment 4) o In 2015, the Citizens Transportation Committee completed two surveys targeting Barriers to Employment (Attachment 5) • Local Plans Review: o Urbanized area land use/comprehensive plans • Facility Development: o Iowa City Transit Maintenance/Storage Facility o University of Iowa Cambus storage facility renovation and expansion o Coralville Transit Maintenance Facility - Phase II On-Going Planning Efforts: • Transit Asset Management Plans (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) • Program of Projects (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) • Title VI/LEP (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) • DBE Program Plan/Goals (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) • Transportation Improvement Program (TIP/STIP) (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) • Transit Performance Statistics/Trends/MPOJC 5307 Operating Funds Formula • Public Participation Plans/MPOJC • Iowa DOT Consolidated Application (Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, Cambus) Current Planning Efforts: MPOJC PTP (TAG) Committee (Agendas and Minutes are found in Attachment 6): In developing the 2022-2027 PTP, MPOJC brought together four existing transportation committees from the Iowa City Urbanized Area. These four committees include representatives from area human service agencies, fixed route transit service, ADA paratransit service, and mobility coordination. MPOJC also utilizes these four committees in the annual PTP update. The current PTP Committee members include members from the following committees: Johnson County Livable Communities Transportation Committee: The Johnson County Livable Community for Successful Aging (JCLC) Policy Board partners with organizations, businesses and individuals to address and facilitate personal independence and civic and social engagement for seniors and those with disabilities. An initiative of the Johnson County Board of Supervisors, JCLC serves in an advisory capacity. The JCLC Policy Board appoints five Action Teams, including a transportation action team. Action Teams spearhead new initiatives in support of JCLC’s mission and meet on a quarterly basis. The membership of the Transportation Action Team includes representatives from MPOJC, all public transit providers, some private transportation providers, and the Johnson County Mobility Coordinator. Johnson County SEATS Paratransit Advisory Committee: The Paratransit Advisory Committee consists of nine members; including two members appointed by the Iowa City City Council; one member appointed by the Coralville City Council; two members appointed by the Johnson County Board of Supervisors; and four SEATS consumers appointed by the Board of Supervisors. MPOJC has an advisory role on the committee. 6 The committee’s role is to provide a forum in which consumers and elected representatives can voice their concerns, ideas and proposed solutions for improving the Johnson County SEATS paratransit service. The committee meets on a quarterly basis. Citizens Transportation Committee (CTC): The Citizens Transportation Committee (CTC) is a nonprofit organization with a mission to promote inclusive transportation options for workers. The CTC is made up of a coalition of community organizations, employers, and community members dedicated to expanding transportation options in the Iowa City urbanized area. The CTC meets monthly. Johnson County Mobility Coordinator Advisory Group: The Johnson County Mobility Coordinator is part of the Johnson County Social Services Department and organizes transportation services throughout the county and assists in improving overall mobility for elderly, low-income persons and person with disabilities. The mobility coordinator seeks to educate and enhance transportation options in the community by serving as a single point of contact for transportation referrals, education and community outreach. The Mobility Coordinator is tasked with increasing awareness of public transit and increase ridership, ultimately leading to a more independent lifestyle. The Mobility Coordinator also helps identify what transportation options exist, how to plan a trip riding local public transit systems, learn routes, schedules and become familiar with user-friendly technology that is helpful for transit riders. The Johnson County Mobility Coordinator Advisory Group meets every quarter. 7 Section Two: Inventory and Area Profile Public Transportation Providers Iowa City Transit (includes University Heights): Iowa City Transit provides service on 17 regular routes from 6:00 a.m.-11:00 p.m. All routes operate daily with 30-minute service during peak periods. The Seventh Avenue (during a.m. and p.m. peak periods), Melrose Express, Westside Hospital, Eastside Express, and Westport routes operate hourly all day long. Midday service is hourly except on the Towncrest and Oakcrest where service is 30 minutes all day during the University academic year. The Eastside Loop and Westside Loop operate when Iowa City schools are in session. Hourly evening service is provided to the same general service area using combined routes, from 6:30 p.m.-11:00 p.m. Saturday service operates hourly all day with service ending at 7:00 p.m. There is no fixed route service on Sundays. Iowa City Transit also extends service to Chatham Oaks Care Facility located on the west side of Iowa City. During peak periods Iowa City Transit operates 20 buses. Eight buses operate weekdays off- peak and all day Saturday. During evening hours five buses are in service. The Downtown Iowa City Transit Interchange is the hub of Iowa City Transit’s operations. All regular routes arrive and depart at the interchange except for the Eastside Loop, allowing for coordinated transfers between buses. There is one free-fare route, the Downtown Transit Shuttle. The existing fare structure is: Fares: $1.00 base fare (children under 5 years old are free) $0.75 youth (K-12th grade) $1 per family - Saturday Family Fare Discounted Fares: $0.50 Elderly (60 years old and up) $0.50 Medicare Card Disabled/low-income elderly and Johnson County SEATS card holders are free Bus Passes: $2.00 24-hour pass $8.50 10-ride pass $32.00 31-day adult pass $27.00 31-day youth pass $240.00 annual University of Iowa student U-pass $100.00 semester pass for Kirkwood Community College students $100.00 youth semester pass $28.00 monthly University of Iowa faculty/staff pass $27.00 low-income monthly pass Free transfers are available and may be used on Coralville Transit. All Iowa City Transit fixed route buses are lift -equipped. Demand responsive paratransit service is provided during fixed-route service hours, operated by Johnson County SEATS. The Iowa City Transit fleet inventory can be found in Attachment 7. 8 Coralville Transit (includes North Liberty): Coralville Transit operates two routes on weekdays between 6:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.; one additional route weekdays during the a.m. and p.m. peak hours; and one evening route until 12:00 a.m. An additional peak hour (tripper) route provides service to the core area of Coralville during the a.m. and p.m. rush hours when the University of Iowa is in session. The Lantern Park and Tenth Street routes operate in the core area of Coralville with half hour headways except during midday when headways are one hour. The Express Route operates on a 75-minute headway in the a.m. and p.m. peak, with no midday service (no service at Coral Ridge Mall). Saturday service is provided on one route that serves the Lantern Park/10th Street service area from 7:00 a.m.-7:30 p.m. Coralville Transit offers a commuter route to North Liberty on weekdays from 7 a.m.-8 a.m. and 5 p.m.-6 p.m. There is no midday service and this route does not service Coral Ridge Mall. Coralville Transit operates seven buses during weekday peak periods, three buses off peak, and one bus evenings and Saturdays. No service is offered on Sunday. The tripper route does not operate during University of Iowa summer and interim periods. All Coralville Transit routes interchange at Coral Ridge Mall, the Downtown Iowa City Transit Interchange, and at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Fares: $1.00 base fare (children under 5 years old are free) $0.75 youth (5-15 years old) $1 per family - Saturday Family Fare Discounted Fares: Senior and disabled (65 years old and up) are free $0.50 Medicare Card Disabled/low-income elderly and Johnson County SEATS card holders are free Bus Passes: $20.00 20-ride pass $32.00 31-day adult pass University of Iowa student U-pass are accepted All Coralville Transit fixed route buses are lift-equipped. Demand responsive paratransit service is provided during fixed-route service hours, operated by Johnson County SEATS. The Coralville Transit fleet inventory can be found in Attachment 7. University of Iowa Cambus: Cambus provides service on 13 routes Monday through Friday, and four routes Saturday and Sunday during the academic year. Cambus is a no fare service designed to facilitate circulation throughout the University campus. Although designed primarily to serve University students, faculty and staff, Cambus is also open to the general public. Cambus operates two separate levels of service throughout the year. Academic year service is the highest level of service, summer/interim service is approximately 75% of academic year service. Differences in level of service are in the amount of service provided, not in the areas served. The service area remains the same during both periods. The primary routes, Red and Blue, operate in nearly identical clockwise and counter clockwise loops which serve the residence halls, University Hospitals, most academic buildings, Iowa City, and commuter parking lots. The Red, Blue, Interdorm, and Hawkeye-Interdorm routes are the 9 only routes which operate on Saturday and Sunday, for 28 weeks per year. The other routes are designed for specific functions: service to the Research Campus, service to residence halls, service to the commuter lots, service between main campus and the hospital area, and service to the Hawkeye campus. During the academic year Cambus operates 26 buses during daytime peak hours, 8-12 buses between 7:00 p.m. and 9:30 p.m., and five buses between 9:30 p.m. and 12:30 a.m. Weekend service on the Red, Blue, Hawkeye-Interdorm, and Interdorm routes operate between 8:30 a.m. and 1:00 a.m. with four buses. Cambus also operates a Safe Ride service on Friday and Saturday nights from midnight to 2:20 a.m. with two buses. All Cambus fixed route buses are low-floor and ramp equipped. Cambus operates a special paratransit system, Bionic Bus. Similar to the fixed-route system, it is intended for University students, faculty and staff, but is also open to the public. The Bionic Bus system operates small accessible buses on a demand responsive basis. Service hours are the same as fixed route scheduled hours on Saturday and Sunday. A reduced level of service is provided during summer and interim periods. The University of Iowa Cambus fleet inventory can be found in Attachment 7. University of Iowa Employee Van Pool: The van pool program is for University of Iowa employees only. Each rider pays a fee to participate. Since the user fee does not cover the full cost of the program, the University of Iowa Parking & Transportation Department subsidizes 1/3 of the costs. The program utilizes both 15-passenger and 7-passenger vans. Vehicles are leased through the University’s Fleet Services which also performs all the maintenance work on the vans as well as provides fuel. Vanpool drivers have their van fees waived. Drivers are responsible for the vanpool’s operation and keep the van at their home. In 2020, the program had 77 vans serving the following communities: Ainsworth, Amana, Anamosa, Cedar Rapids, Clarence, Columbus Junction, Conesville, Davenport, Hiawatha, Homestead, Kalona, Keota, Marengo, Marion, Mount Pleasant, Mount Vernon, Muscatine, North English, Olds, Parnell, Riverside, Shueyville, Solon, Tipton, Washington, Wellman, West Branch, West Liberty, and Williamsburg. Currently, the University of Iowa employee van pool program vehicles are not ADA accessible. Johnson County SEATS: Iowa City and Coralville Transit systems contract with Johnson County SEATS for provision of complimentary demand-responsive paratransit service during fixed-route service hours. Johnson County SEATS also provides scheduled demand response service to all residents outside of the metropolitan area in Johnson County. To qualify for SEATS service in the urbanized area, you must have a transportation disability that precludes you from utilizing fixed-route service. While all fixed-route buses are now lift- equipped, SEATS is available to pick up and drop off passengers who are unable to, or are not mobile enough, to reach a standard bus stop. Iowa City Transit provides 14 vehicles to Johnson County SEATS for use in Iowa City, Coralville Transit provides 4 vehicles for use in Coralville, and ECICOG provides 10 buses for use in Johnson County. All of the SEATS vehicles are ADA accessible. East Central Iowa Council of Governments (ECICOG): 10 ECICOG manages funding and contracts with third -parties to provide CorridorRides, a regional transportation service. CorridorRides includes Rural Dail -A-Ride, 380Express (a commuter service between Cedar Rapids and Iowa City), and VanPool and carpool programs. School Bus Service: Iowa City Community School District (North American Central School Bus): • 118 buses (12 ADA buses) • 107 Routes • 1 charter bus Iowa City Regina School District (Central Iowa Transit): • 6 buses (0 ADA buses) • 6 routes • 1 charter bus • 1 bus for Hawk Ridge (University of Iowa) Clear Creek-Amana School District: • 28 buses (4 ADA buses) • 18 routes • 4 vans Willowwinds School: • 1 vehicle (non-ADA) The Iowa City School District is served by North American Central School Bus, the Iowa City Regina School District is served by Central Iowa Transport, and the Clear Creek-Amana School District provides in-house bus services (some service is outside of the Iowa City metropolitan area). North American Central School Bus also offers charter services not under the current school district contract. Central Iowa Transit also offers charter service and contracts with the University of Iowa for transportation services between Hawk Ridge Apartments and campus. Willowwinds Schools is a small private facility with 30 students and has 1 van for school activities. Human Services Providers (*transportation providers): • 4Cs/Hometies* (non-ADA vehicles) • Iowa City Housing Authority • Mayors Youth Employment Program* (MYEP) (non-ADA vehicles) • Pathways* (adult daycare) (non-ADA vehicles) • Access2Independence (adult daycare) • Reach for Your Potential (adult daycare) • Chatham Oaks* (non-ADA vehicles) • Goodwill Industries • Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation • Crisis Center • United Action for Youth* (non-ADA vehicles) • Domestic Violence Intervention Program (DVIP) • Johnson County Social Services • Johnson County General Assistance 11 • ARC of Southeast Iowa • Big Brothers/Big Sisters • Elder Services, Inc./RSVP • Four Oaks • Handicare Inc* (non-ADA vehicles) • Neighborhood Services (2 locations) • Salvation Army • Kirkwood Skills to Employment • Systems Unlimited • Shelter House* (non-ADA vehicles) • Successful Living • Hawkeye Area Community Action Program • Prelude • ICCSD Family Resource Center* (non-ADA vehicles) • Solon Senior Advocates* (non-ADA vehicles) • Iowa City/Johnson County Senior center Very few human service agencies have their own vehicles and when they do they have very specific uses for those vehicles. Many human service agencies indicated that they would prefer not to have their own vehicles since they are expensive to maintain and operate. From past surveys and meetings, we learned that the most common issue facing human service programs is the lack of public transit service options to meet their needs. Their clients often spend too much time on certain bus routes before reaching their destination. Human service agencies continue to utilize public transit as much as possible and work public transit into their daily operations and programs. Private Transportation Providers: Taxi Service • Big Ten Taxicab (7 vans) (non-ADA vehicles) • Yellow Cab (10 vans, 11 cars) (one ADA vehicle) The list of taxi cab services comes from the City of Iowa City’s list of permitted taxi cab companies. These cab companies operate throughout the Iowa City Urbanized Area but are only required to have an operating permit in Iowa City. Yellow Cab operates one lift equipped van for persons with disabilities. Airport Transportation Services: • Eastern Iowa Airport-Airport Shuttle Service (non-ADA vehicles) Hotel Shuttles: • Spring Hill Suites by Marriott - Coralville (non-ADA vehicles) • Coralville Marriott Hotel and Convention Center (non-ADA vehicles) • Residence Inn by Marriott - Coralville (on-site car rental) (non-ADA vehicles) • Home2 Suites by Hilton - Iowa City/Coralville (shuttle) (non-ADA vehicles) • Homewood Suites by Hilton - Coralville Iowa River Landing (shuttle) (non-ADA vehicles) • Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott - Coralville (on-site car rental) (non-ADA vehicles) • SureStay Plus Hotel by Best Western - Iowa City/Coralville (non-ADA vehicles) • Mainstay Suites (shuttle) (non-ADA vehicles) 12 There were 35 hotels identified in the Iowa City Urbanized Area with 8 of them providing transportation services for their guests. Medical Transport/Ambulance Services/Hospital Transportation Services: • Advanced Medical Transport • South East Iowa Ambulance • Corridor Medical Shuttle • VA Medical Center • On Time Medical Transportation • CARE Ambulance • Road to Recovery Interstate Bus Services: • Burlington Trailways (Iowa City Court Street Transportation Center) • Mega-Bus (Coralville Intermodal Facility, Iowa River Landing) Currently, the Iowa City Court Street Transportation facility contracts with one intercity bus company, Burlington Trailways, for regularly scheduled stops in the Iowa City Urbanized Area. Mega-bus also makes frequent stops at the Coralville Intermodal Facility in the Iowa River Landing. Senior Living/Independent Living Facilities (*transportation services): • Legacy Active Retirement Community-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Melrose Meadows Assisted Living-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Oaknoll Retirement Residence-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Walden Place-Iowa City* (non-ADA vehicles) • Bickford Senior Housing-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Grand Living at Bridgewater-Coralville • Coralville Senior Residences-Coralville • Diamond Senior Apartments-Iowa City • Brown Deer Place Retirement Living & Memory Care-Coralville* (ADA vehicles) • Capitol House Apartments-Iowa City • Citizen Building Apartments-Iowa City • Concord Terrace Apartments-Iowa City • Coral Village Apartments-Coralville • Ecumenical Towers-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Jefferson Point-North Liberty* (ADA vehicles) • Lexington Place-Iowa City* (ADA vehicles) • Liberty Housing Company-North Liberty • North Liberty Living Center-North Liberty • Regency Heights-Iowa City • Keystone Place at Forevergreen-North Liberty* (ADA vehicles) • Vintage Cooperative of Coralville-Coralville Day Cares with Transportation Services: • Hundred Acre Woods (non-ADA vehicles) • Kiddie Konnection (non-ADA vehicles) • La Petite Academy(non-ADA vehicles) 13 Of the over 50 licensed childcare facilities in the Iowa City Urbanized Area, only three have their own transportation services. The services include pick up and drop off at schools and field trips. Performance Measures Each year, MPOJC prepares transit performance statistics for Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus. The numbers come from the approved Iowa DOT year-end report for each transit provider. MPOJC uses these numbers to calculate the 5307 operating funding apportionment each year as well. Information is summarized for fixed route and paratransit service. The factors include: • Ridership • Total Operating Costs • Fare Revenue • Revenue Vehicle Miles • Revenue Vehicle Hours • Cost Per Ride • Cost Per Revenue Vehicle Mile • Cost Per Revenue Vehicle Hour • Fare box/Expense Ratio • Average Fare • Operating Deficit Per Trip • Riders Per Revenue Vehicle Mile • Riders Per Revenue Vehicle Hour The FY2019 and FY2020 Performance Statistic Tables can be found in Attachment 8. Area Profile The Iowa City Urbanized Area includes the municipalities of Coralville, Iowa City, North Liberty, Tiffin, and University Heights. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the population for the urbanized area was 84,672 in 2000, 102,961 in 2010, and 119,572 in 2019. These numbers represent an average annual population growth of 1.7%. Thirty-year forecasts for population, projected number of households, and occupancy forecasts for the MPOJC urbanized area and Johnson County can be found below. The method used to produce these forecasts is based on the assumption that past population growth rates can be used to predict future growth. Forecasts were derived using the 2000, 2010, and 2019 census population for each community. Population Projections/Demographics Population Projections 2019-2050 Entity Census 2019 2030 2040 2050 Iowa City Population Household Units Renter-Occupied Units Owner-Occupied Units 75,130 33,254 15,979 14,589 82,267 37,776 18,600 16,092 90,082 42,913 21,650 17,750 98,640 48,749 25,200 19,578 Coralville Population Household Units Renter-Occupied 22,290 9,194 4,178 26,748 10,168 5,377 32,098 11,246 6,920 38,518 12,438 8,906 14 Units Owner-Occupied Units 4,279 4,492 4,716 4,952 North Liberty Population Household Units Renter-Occupied Units Owner-Occupied Units 18,829 7,548 2,203 4,985 26,260 9,888 3,223 6,685 36,904 12,953 4,715 8,964 51,665 16,968 6,898 12,020 Tiffin Population Household Units Renter-Occupied Units Owner-Occupied Units 3,351 1,473 424 883 6,114 2,559 881 1,282 11,128 4,445 1,831 1,861 20,302 7,720 3,804 3,020 University Heights Population Household Units Renter-Occupied Units Owner-Occupied Units 1,159 542 253 278 1,256 574 432 238 1,361 607 738 203 1,475 643 1,262 173 Rural Johnson County Population 30,381 34,270 37,662 41,240 Johnson County (Total) Population 151,140 176,915 209,235 251,840 Source: American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimate tables. Commuting Characteristics Municipality Walked Bike or Taxi Public Transportation Iowa City 13.2% 5.5% 11.9% Coralville 3.6% 1.1% 7.1% North Liberty 0.7% 0.8% 0.9% Tiffin 0.3% 0.3% 0.2% University 31.8% 11.3% 6.7% Heights Source: 2019 ACS 1-Year Estimate Commuting Characteristics Senior Populations There are more than 18,800 individuals in Johnson County over the age of 65. According to the Census, 9,535 or 50% of Johnson County’s older adults live within the city limits of Iowa City. Slightly more than 2,300 older adults (12% of the county population) live in Coralville, 1,305 and 336 older persons live in North liberty and Tiffin, while 135 reside in University Heights. Slightly more than 5,000 (27%) older persons live in unincorporated or rural areas of Johnson County. According to a Johnson County Livable Community for Successful Aging (JCLC) Policy Board 15 survey, approximately 92% of the older adults in Johnson County rely on private vehicles for their transportation needs, and 86% of these reported that they were able to drive themselves. Among this group, 70% reported that they drove daily, and the majority of older adults were happy with their ability to get around the county. Disabled Populations The disabled population in the Iowa City metropolitan area is served by both fixed route and complementary paratransit service. Iowa City Transit and Coralville Transit track disabled riders in their fixed route service through the sale of Senior/Disabled bus passes. Iowa City Transit’s sales are split 74% seniors and 26% disabled. Coralville Transit is split 63% seniors and 37% disabled. Johnson County SEATS provides (by contract) complementary paratransit service for both Iowa City Transit (University Heights has a separate contract with SEATS) and Coralville Transit (includes North Liberty). Riders must qualify to ride SEATS through each community. The metropolitan area’s ridership for FY2020 was as follows: ` FY2020 Johnson County SEATS Ridership Iowa City 73,489 Coralville 8,955 Rural (Includes Tiffin) 1,755 North Liberty 478 University Heights 12 University of Iowa The Iowa City Urbanized Area is a diverse community with most foreign-speaking individuals residing in the area due to their affiliation with the University of Iowa, either as an international student or visiting scholar. The University has, on average, an international student population of 3,400 persons on an annual basis as well as approximately 450 visiting scholars, which represents about 10% of the University of Iowa student enrollment. The largest national representations of international students and scholars at the University of Iowa are from Asia, as shown below: UI International Students and Scholars by World Region National Representation Student Population National Representation Scholar Population China 2,096 China 181 India 358 India 44 South Korea 265 Japan 28 Iran 63 Brazil 24 Malaysia 57 South Korea 21 Source: The University of Iowa, International Students Fall 2018 Enrollment Statistics According to the University of Iowa’s fall 2018 International Students Enrollment Statistics, China, India, South Korea, and Iran remain the top represented countries in the international student population. Malaysia (57 students) rounds out the top five, replacing Japan (69 students) from the fall 2008 largest international student enrollment representations. As for the scholar population, China, India, South Korea, Japan, and Brazil consist of the top international scholar representations between 2012 and 2018. India (44 scholars) replaced South Korea (37 scholars) from the fall 2015 largest international scholar enrollment representations. 16 According to the University of Iowa’s fall 2019 Profile of Students Enrolled, 90 students were enrolled in Iowa’s Intensive English Program (IIEP). These classes are designed to assist students who have yet to achieve the language proficiency needed to succeed in a degree program. They are an orientation to the cultural, social and academic aspects of the United States, while also teaching basic language skills such as writing, grammar, punctuation, and comprehension. As of January 5th, 2015, visiting scholars are required to establish language proficiency through one of three ways; (1) an English language test (2) signed documentation from an English language school or other academic institution, or (3) an in-person interview. Iowa City Community School District The Iowa City Community School District (ICCSD) and the Iowa Department of Education compile information regarding the number of students receiving English Language Learning (ELL) services. The following charts show how the use of ELL services, largely attributed to an influx of Spanish, Vietnamese, Arabic, and Bosnian, is increasing in Iowa’s schools. For the 2019-2020 school year, there are a total of 14,276 students in the Iowa City Community School District. The number of students receiving ELL services is 12.5% (1,785 students). Ten Year English Language Learner (ELL) Student trends in Iowa Source: Iowa Department of Education, PK-12 Student Data ELL services have increased 68% over the last decade. According to the US Department of education 2014-2015 school year data, the native language of most ELL Students is Spanish (67.3% of all Iowa ELL students). The second most common native language is Vietnamese (3%), followed by Arabic (2.7%), and Bosnian (2.5%). 17 Ten Year English Language Learner Trends in the Iowa City Community School District (ICCSD) Source: Iowa Department of Education, PK-12 Student Data Iowa Public School PK-12 Limited English Proficient Students (LEP) by District and Grade Limited English Proficiency (LEP) In determining the number or proportion of Limited English Proficient (LEP) persons in the Iowa City area, the 2019 1-Year U.S. Census American Community survey (ACS) data was evaluated. According to the ACS, 25,885 persons in Johnson County (18% of the population) spoke a language other than English at home. Of these, 10,149 (6.7% of the population) reported speaking English less than “very well,” or would be considered to have limited English proficiency. The table below shows the language subgroups as follows: Persons in Johnson County Who Reported Speaking English less Than “Very Well” Language Spoken Number of Persons Spanish 1,913 1.27% Other Indo-European language 4,043 2.68% Asian and Pacific Island languages 2,302 1.52% Other languages 1,891 1.25% Source: 2019 ACS 1 Year Estimates (Language Spoken At Home) After analyzing the area’s population characteristics, University of Iowa population, and school district population, both the Hispanic/Latino and the Asian/Pacific Island populations were identified as needing language assistance. As a result, the local transit providers offer information in Chinese and Spanish. Percent of Total Population 18 Section Three: Coordination Issues As a result of public input, transportation organizations, and advisory group meetings, the following service needs, fleet needs, and facility needs have been identified consistently over the years. Service Needs • Late night, early morning hours, Sundays, and holiday service. • Public transit may not provide frequent enough service to certain employment and/or shopping centers in the urban area or surrounding communities. • Additional training and education material to potential users of public transit. • Planning for the eventual need for fixed route and/or demand response transit service to Tiffin and North Liberty. • Need for additional bus shelter facilities. Need for increased budgets for maintenance and expansion of bus shelters. • Promotion of the Transit App/Google Transit may reduce the need for more shelters. More informational signage at bus stops. • Need for regional service options, including bus/light rail service between the Iowa City urbanized area and Cedar Rapids and transportation services to work destinations outside of the Iowa City urbanized area, including Riverside Casino and Amana. • Lack of an ADA accessible vehicle for use by private sector for service after fixed route and paratransit service hours end. Fleet Needs • The three transit systems in the urbanized area, including fixed route and paratransit buses, have received 25 new buses since 2015. Still, about half of the buses in the three fleets are older than 12 years. • The local human service agencies have limited fleets and little funding to expand or repair existing fleets. Many agencies must rely on public transportation, donations, or resort to using personal vehicles when transporting clients. • As the need for service grows so does the need for equipment. Newer and more efficient buses are needed in order to keep costs down. Need to consider alternative fuel buses, such as electric. Facility Needs • Coralville Transit has plans for a Phase II of their intermodal facility located in the Iowa River Landing Development Area. • The Iowa City Transit facility is undersized and has significant environmental issues due to it being constructed on top of an old dump site. Cracks in the utilitie s infrastructure underneath the building cause significant air quality issues. The flood of 2008 also 19 damaged the pipes underneath the facility. Driveways and parking areas have settled 4 to 6 feet. Settling and methane gas issues have made it difficult to expand the facility and maintenance costs continue to increase. Iowa City Transit continues to search for funding opportunities. The cost of the project is estimated at $20 million. • University of Iowa Cambus continues to update their existing transit facility. A storage addition was completed in 2012 and a significant facility renovation was completed in 2019. • The need for additional bus stop shelters was identified by the Johnson County Livable Communities Transportation Committee and the Johnson County SEATS Paratransit Committee. • Cambus continues to monitor facility growth and development on the University campus. Status of Past Priorities/Strategies Service Needs • Lack of public transit service during late night and early morning hours, Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays. UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. Implementation of new programs are being considered. • Public transit may be very inconvenient for some due to time consuming rides on public transit. UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. • Public transit may not provide frequent enough service to certain employment and/or shopping centers in the urban area or surrounding communities. UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. Implementation of new programs are being considered. • Distribute more training and education material to potential users of public transit. Including the Livable Communities Transportation brochure. UPDATE: Part of Mobility Coordinator Position. - Expanded to include virtual trainings and technical assistance for use of Transit App. • Evaluate the need for fixed route and/or demand response transit service to Tiffin. Consider options to pay for service. UPDATE: Determined to not be necessary at this time. Future consideration. • Evaluate need for additional bus shelter facilities, including future shelters in North Liberty and Tiffin. The implementation of the Bongo program may reduce the need for more shelters. Reduced budgets and increased maintenance costs are also prohibiting the placement of more shelters. 20 UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. New shelters are being installed by Iowa City Transit and Cambus annually. Bongo program has been replaced by Transit App (with real time GPS location for buses) and stop/route planning information is available on Google Maps. • More park and ride facilities are necessary to reduce vehicle congestion and the growing need for more parking in the downtown Iowa City area and at the University of Iowa. UPDATE: Developing Park and ride facilities considered in University of Iowa Park ing Study. Iowa DOT also produced a Park and Ride study including urban and rural parts of Johnson County. • Consider the need for a bus/light rail service between Iowa City urbanized area and Cedar Rapids. UPDATE: Three studies have been completed over the past two years exploring passenger transportation service between North Liberty and Iowa City. Implementation steps being considered by local governments. Passenger rail service to Cedar Rapids is no longer being considered at this time due to cost. The three transit agencies continue to work with ECICOG in coordinating the CorridorRides program. Even though ridership in the program has been greatly affected by COVID-19, the three transit agencies will continue its support of the program and work to improve ridership until the I-80/I-380 reconstruction is complete. Reevaluation of the program will take place at that time. • Evaluate business demand for transportation services outside of the Iowa City urbanized area, including Riverside Casino and Amana. UPDATE: Ride sharing and van pool programs have been developed by the East Central Iowa Council of Governments (the regional transit provider). Discussions for bus service are ongoing. • Continue to support the Volunteer Transportation Coordinator position with Elder Services. This service targets persons with disabilities that cannot utilize fixed route or paratransit service. This position coordinates a door-through-door service with the support of the local medical community. UPDATE: Program now funded by The United Way of Johnson and Washington Counties. • Lack of bus shelters in metropolitan area. UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. Implementation of new programs are being considered. • Consider more partnerships in order to provide late night, holiday, and weekend transit service. 21 UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. Implementation of new programs are being considered. • Lack of an ADA accessible vehicle for use by private sector for service after fixed route and paratransit service hours end. UPDATE: Yellow Cab does provide an ADA service but is very expensive and not a good alternative for many low-income individuals. Further consideration is necessary. Fleet Needs • The spare ratios for the three transit systems in the urbanized area including fixed route and paratransit buses. The total number of buses for the Coralville Transit fleet is 13, Iowa City Transit 38, and Cambus 34. Almost half of the buses in the three fleets are older than 12 years. The following spare ratios are currently in effect for each system: o Coralville Transit: 30% (3 spares/ 13 total/ 10 peak) o Iowa City Transit: 23% (7 spares/ 38 total/ 30 peak) o University of Iowa Cambus: 17% (5 spares/ 34 total/ 29 peak) UPDATE: Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus have received 26 new buses (both fixed route and ADA buses) since 2015. • The local human service agencies have limited fleets and little funding to expand or repair existing fleets. Many agencies must rely on public transportation, donations, or resort to using personal vehicles when transporting clients. UPDATE: More study is needed. • As the need for service grows so does the need for equipment. Newer and more efficient buses are needed in order to keep costs down. New routes are anticipated where expansion will be necessary. UPDATE: Iowa City Transit will begin using 4 electric buses later in 2021. Facility Needs • Coralville Transit has plans for an intermodal facility to be located in their new Iowa River Landing Development Area. This redevelopment area will include not only the new intermodal facility but also a hotel and conference center (completed in 2006), professional office and retail space, public recreation, open space, and trails. This intermodal facility will include a transit interchange/hub for Coralville Transit and will be fully operational for paratransit services for Johnson County SEATS and Cambus. The facility will also provide taxicab and intercity bus accommodations, a park-and-ride program, bicycle facilities, and will include administrative offices for transit and parking. Coralville has already received three “earmarks” for design and engineering totaling about $1,500,000. The total cost for this facility is over $18,000,000. Coralville Transit has recently hired a consultant to design and engineer the intermodal facility. Earmark funds will pay for the D/E. Coralville Transit has received four earmarks for the intermodal facility totaling $2,466,980. In 2011, the City of Coralville received a $4 million Livability Grant from FTA to be used in the construction of the intermodal facility. 22 Coralville is currently designing the facility to be built in phases. Construction will begin in 2014. UPDATE: Coralville Transit’s Intermodal Facility in the Iowa River Landing district was completed in 2015. Planning for Phase II expansion is ongoing. • The Iowa City Transit facility is undersized and has significant environmental issues d ue to it being constructed on top of an old dump site. Cracks in the utilities infrastructure underneath the building cause significant air quality issues. The flood of 2008 also damaged the pipes underneath the facility. Driveways and parking areas have settled 4 to 6 feet. Settling and methane gas issues have made it difficult to expand the facility and maintenance costs continue to increase. Iowa City plans to implement a feasibility study for a new transit facility in 2012 with construction to begin in 2015 if funding is secured through federal earmarks. The cost of the project is estimated at $20 million. Iowa City Transit received $64,000 for building repair through PTMS in FY2007. These building repairs were completed in the spring of 2008. Iowa City Transit invested over $200,000 in improving the air quality at their current transit/maintenance facility in 2000 and 2001. UPDATE: Iowa City Transit continues to pursue funding options for the construction of a new Transit Maintenance/Storage Facility to be located in the public works complex located on South Gilbert Street. Repairs on current facility are ongoing. • In FY2007, Cambus received $64,000 from PTMS to install a sprinkler system in their existing maintenance facility. The facility is located along the Iowa River and was damaged by the 2008 flood. In FY08 Cambus received $880,000 in funding through the State’s RIIF program to expand their current bus storage facility. Cambus also utilized $230,000 in 5310 funds (FY2007 and FY2008) in the expansion project. Before the expansion Cambus could not house their entire transit fleet inside, leaving 25% of the fleet outside. A site and program study has been conducted by the University of Iowa and it has been determined that a joint use facility, along with the University of Iowa’s Fleet Services Division, would provide the opportunity for a more efficient and cost effective facility. Staffing and equipment would also be shared by the two university divisions. Future opportunities continue to be evaluated. UPDATE: Renovations to the interior and exterior of existing facility were completed in 2019. Cambus received $600,000 in funding through the Iowa DOT’s RIIF program to fund the renovations. Bus storage at this location is currently at its maximum capacity. • The need for additional bus stop shelters was identified by the Johnson County Livable Communities Transportation Committee and the Johnson County SEATS Paratransit Committee. UPDATE: Part of the Iowa City Transit Study completed in 2020. Implementation of new programs are being considered. Cambus implemented the study’s recommendations in the Fall of 2020. • Cambus continues to monitor the impacts of the growth of University facilities, including parking, and University Hospitals and modifies services as needed. 23 UPDATE: Ongoing evaluation. Other Recent Developments COVID-19 As we are all aware, the COVID -19 pandemic has had a huge impact on transit ridership in the Iowa City urbanized area. Ridership has plummeted by more than 66% between the first quarter of FY2020 and FY2021. This is on top of a consistent decline in ridership over the past 5 to 6 years. Federal funding in the form of the CARES Act and CRRSAA will be utilized by the transit agencies in the Iowa City urbanized area to subsidize operations budgets with the reduction of fare revenue and student and parking fees as well as expected reductions in State transit funding. Iowa City Area Transit Study The 2019-2020 Iowa City Area Transit Study is the result of one year of public outreach, technical analysis, and service planning conducted by Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, University of Iowa Cambus, and consultant staff. The final product of the study is a fiscall y constrained Preferred Alternative that makes detailed route-level recommendations for improving public transit in the Iowa City Urbanized Area. Goals for the study were developed based on public input collected through surveys and in- person outreach, as well as from study agency goals. The primary goals of the study are to increase ridership, better collaborate across agencies, improve communications to riders, and take a regional approach to transit planning. The executive summary can be found in Attachment 4. 24 Section Four: Priorities and Strategies At their January meetings, the MPOJC PTP (TAG) Committee made the following recommendations to the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board. The Urbanized Area Policy Board held a public hearing and approved the following recommendations at their March 31, 2021 meeting. The following recommendations include 5-Year Priorities, other Long-Term Priorities, Goals and Objectives, and 5310 funding. 5 Year Priorities • Continue to meet with the PTP Committee every five years to update the PTP and continue to utilize the Johnson County Livable Communities Transportation Committee, the Johnson County SEATS Advisory Committee, the Citizen Transportation Committee, and the Mobility Coordinator Advisory Group during the years when the PTP update.is not scheduled (agendas and minutes). All four committees will be asked to participate during the update year and will meet at least twice. • Continue to upgrade and renovate transit facilities for Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and Cambus. • Continue to update and modernize transit vehicles and technology, such as electric buses and mobile ticketing. • Evaluate existing service and coordination of both fixed route and paratransit service; include recommendations from the Iowa City Area Transit Study. • Continue to promote trip-maker programs throughout the urbanized area, including Google Transit and the Transit App. • Consider recommendations from Iowa City Area Transit Study regarding the need for a lift-equipped vehicle for use during fixed route off hours, late night and weekend transit service in the urbanized area. • Consider recommendations from Iowa City Area Transit Study regarding new bus route service in commercial areas. • Support bus shelter revitalization and replacement programs in the urbanized area. • Support ECICOG’s CorridorRides program after the completion of the I-80/I-380 interchange project is completed. • Support efforts to establish light rail service between Iowa City and North Liberty and Amtrak service between Iowa City and Chicago. • Continue to provide education materials and ride training programs through the Mobility Coordinator. Other Long Term Priorities • Develop programs for senior riders through Johnson County Livable Communities Senior Transportation Committee. • Continue to evaluate park-and-ride programs in the urbanized area. • Continue to evaluate bus routes to residential areas outside of the urbanized area. • Look for corporate partners in transportation programs. Goals and Objectives From the above identified deficiencies and needs, the following goals and objectives were developed: ❖ Goal: Extend off-hour service options including ADA service. o Objective: Support Iowa City Transit’s efforts to utilize CAREAS Act funding on evening service, late night service, and Sunday service. 25 o Objective: Consider recommendations from Iowa City Area Transit Study regarding the need for a lift-equipped vehicle for use during fixed route off hours, late night and weekend transit service in the urbanized area. o Objective: Ensure that all off-hour programs are seamless between transit agencies. ❖ Goal: Update and expand transit facilities and technology. o Objective: Continue to pursue funding options for Iowa City Transit’s new transit storage/maintenance facility. A location has been determined. Due to the current condition of Iowa City’s Transit Facility FTA is encouraging Iowa City Transit to pursue federal funding. o Objective: Support the continued upgrades and expansion of the transit maintenance facility for Cambus. o Objective: Consider joint projects for the three fixed route transit operations and ensure that these programs are seamless between transit agencies. o Objective: Provide support for the upgrade and expansion of additional enclosed bus stop shelters and include additional signage and bus route information at each stop. ❖ Goal: Support the implementation of the recently completed Iowa City Area Transit Study. o Objective: Since the study included all three-area fixed route transit systems, support implementation of the study’s recommendations (study summary found in Attachment 4): ▪ Increasing frequency on core routes ▪ Simplifying routes ▪ Addressing on-time performance problems ▪ Provide more direct service to popular destinations. ❖ Goal: Provide more transportation related training and education programs. o Objective: Continue to provide education materials and ride training programs through the Mobility Coordinator. o Objective: Continue to promote trip-maker programs throughout the urbanized area, including Google Transit and the Transit App and ensure seamless use between transit agencies. ❖ Goal: Provide support for regional transit options. o Objective: Support efforts to continue the 380 Express Bus service after the completion of the I-80/I-380 interchange project is completed. o Objective: Support efforts to establish light rail service between Iowa City and North Liberty. 26 o Objective: Support efforts to establish Amtrak service between Iowa City and Chicago. 5310 Funds • Coralville Transit and Iowa City Transit will continue to use Section 5310 Special Needs funding for their paratransit service contract with Johnson County SEATS. In FY2020, Iowa City Transit received $112,448 and Coralville Transit received $31,780. These funding levels increased dramatically in FY2021 due to increase in 5310 funds through the Iowa Department of Transportation. The FY2021 funding for Iowa City Transit increased to $233,124 and $63,889 for Coralville Transit. It is anticipated that 5310 funding will return to FY2020 funding levels in the future. • CAMBUS will continue to program their Section 5310 Special Needs funds toward bus replacement in their Bionic Bus fleet and operating. Cambus received $158,760 in FY2020 with an increase to $315,941 in FY2021 due to the addition of funds from the Iowa Department of Transportation. Funding levels are anticipated to go back to FY2020 levels. Since Cambus does not contract for paratransit service they will continue to use the funding for bus replacement in their Bionic Bus fleet and for the operation of the program. ❖ Goal: Continue to provide ADA transportation options during fixed route service hours. o Objective: Continue to utilize 5310 funds in the funding of the ADA paratransit service contract with Johnson County SEATS for Iowa City Transit and Coralville Transit and the Bionic Bus program with the University of Iowa. 27 Section Five: Funding Past Funding Summary/Funding Sources Sought Urbanized Area Formula Funding (5307): The 5307 funds will be distributed through the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board using their adopted formula for apportionment. The FY2021 funding amount was $2.9 million with funding levels anticipated to remain or increase slightly at this level. Operating funds will continue to be used for eligible expenses. CARES Act: The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. As part of the CARES Act, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) allocated $25 billion to recipients of urbanized area (Section 5307 funding) and rural area formula funds, with $22.7 billion for large and small urban areas and $2.2 billion for rural areas. Funding is provided at 100-percent federal share, with no local match required, and is available to support capital, operating, and other expenses eligible under those programs to prevent, prepare for, and respond to COVID-19 for operating expenses incurred beginning on January 20, 2020. The State of Iowa received $35,898,003 in CARES Act funding and included $8,331,763 for the Iowa City Urbanized Area. These funds were apportioned to Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus using the MPOJC Section 5307 funding apportionment formula. Iowa City Transit received $5,109,870, Coralville Transit received $1,318,918, and Cambus received $1,902,975 in CARES Act funding. These funds are anticipated to be used over a three-year period. CRRSAA: In addition to the CAREAS Act, the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 (CRRSAA) provided $14 billion in Federal funding allocations to continue to support public transportation systems during the COVID-19 public health emergency. The funding was signed into law on December 27, 2020 and included $1,532,506 for the Iowa City Urbanized Area to be apportioned to Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus. Like the CARES Act, the CRRSAA supplemental funding will be provided at 100-percent federal share, with no local match required. CRRSAA directs recipients to prioritize payroll and operational needs and will also support expenses traditionally eligible under Section 5307 statutory requirements. Using the same formula for the CARES Act funding apportionment from 2020, Iowa City Transit received $939,886, Coralville Transit received $242,596, and Cambus received $350,024. Bus and Bus Facility Formula Grants (5339): Bus and Bus Facility Formula Grant funds are used to finance capital projects to replace, rehabilitate, and purchase buses and related equipment and to construct bus-related facilities. In Iowa, approximately $1,250,000 is received annually to be spent in small urban (less than 50,000 population) and regional transit systems and receives individual allocations for each large urban transit system serving populations between 50,000 and 200,000. The large urban funds are pooled since individual allocations would not allow for bus purchases on an annual basis. All funds are spent on vehicle replacements rather than on expansion vehicles or bus- related facilities and are distributed utilizing the vehicle rankings of the Public Transit 28 Management System (PTMS). Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, University of Iowa Cambus, and Johnson County SEATS participate in the Iowa DOT’s PTMS program for bus replacement. Special Needs Formula Funding (5310): Coralville Transit and Iowa City Transit will continue to use Special Needs funding for their paratransit service contract with Johnson County SEATS. In FY2020, Iowa City Transit received $112,448 and Coralville Transit received $31,780. These funding levels increased dramatically in FY2021 due to increase in 5310 funds through the Iowa Department of Transportation. The FY2021 funding for Iowa City Transit increased to $233,124 and $63,889 for Coralville Transit. It is anticipated that 5310 funding will return to FY2020 funding levels in the future. CAMBUS will continue to program their Special Needs funds toward bus replacement in their Bionic Bus fleet and operating. Cambus received $158,760 in FY2020 with an increase to $315,941 in FY2021 due to the addition of funds from the Iowa Department of Transportation. Funding levels are anticipated to go back to FY2020 levels. Surface Transportation Program (STP) Funding: No transit funding requests are anticipated at this time. Iowa Clean Air Attainment Program (ICAAP) Funding: ICAAP funding levels for FY2021 are anticipated to remain at $4 million per year and are anticipated to remain at $4 million for FY2022-FY2027. There are no transit funding requests anticipated at this time. STA Formula Funding: These funds will be used for transit operations and in FY2022-2027 are anticipated to increase slightly (3%) each year. STA Coordinated Special Projects Funding: No transit funding requests are anticipated at this time. Local Tax/Transit Levy/Student Fees: Iowa City Transit continues to use $.95/$1,000 valuation for their transit levy to provide local funding for transit service. Coralville Transit utilized a $.71/$1,000 valuation transit levy. Cambus is a no fare service and provides local funding through an annual per student fee and parking revenue. The parking revenue amount is based on commuter services on campus. Cambus anticipates utilizing CARES Act and CRRSAA funds to support the student and parking funds due to the impact of COVID -19 on the University of Iowa. Fare Revenue: The existing fare structure for Iowa City Transit and Coralville Transit is a $1.00 base fare plus other programs designed for students, the elderly, and disabled. Iowa City Transit is evaluating a fare-free system similar to Cambus, which is a fare-free service. CARES Act and CRRSAA funds will be used to support fare revenue. Contracts/Other Revenue: Iowa City Transit has a transit service contract with the City of University Heights, generates revenue at the Court Street Transportation Center (intermodal) through the sale of parking permits and commercial space rental, and additional income from the sale of advertising, used oil, and scrap metal. Coralville Transit has a contract with the City of North Liberty for transit service, generates revenue at the Iowa River Landing Transportation Center (intermodal) through the sale of parking permits and commercial space rental, and collects revenue from the sale of advertising, used oil, and scrap metal. The University of Iowa Cambus does not contract for service and generates revenue from the sale of advertising, used oil, and scrap metal. These programs are anticipated to continue. 29 5 Year Funding Program Iowa City Transit (4% annual increase) Funding Program FY2022 FY2023 FY2024 FY2025 FY2026 State Transit $537,486 $558,985 $581,344 $604,598 $628,782 Assistance Urbanized Area $1,882,761 $1,958,071 $2,036,394 $2,117,850 $2,202,564 Formula (5307) Special Needs*(5310) $121,624 $126,489 $131,548 $136,810 $142,283 Local Tax/Levy** $4,203,702 $4,371,850 $4,546,724 $4,728,593 $4,917,737 Fare Revenue** $1,466,001 $1,524,641 $1,585,626 $1,649,051 $1,715,013 Contracts/Other** $1,567,954 $1,630,672 $1,695,898 $1,763,734 $1,834,284 Total Revenue $9,779,528 $10,170,708 $10,577,534 $11,000,636 $11,440,663 Total Operating** $8,684,443 $9,031,820 $9,393,093 $9,768,817 $10,159,569 (Iowa City Transit received $5,109,870 in CARES Act Funding in 2020 and $939,886 in CRRSAA funding in 2021 to assist with COVID-19 effects on transit service) Coralville Transit (4% annual increase) Funding Program FY2022 FY2023 FY2024 FY2025 FY2026 State Transit $294,564 $306,347 $318,601 $331,345 $344,599 Assistance Urbanized Area $485,963 $505,401 $525,617 $546,642 $568,508 Formula (5307) Special Needs*(5310) $34,373 $35,784 $37,178 $38,665 $40,212 Local Tax/Levy** $582,573 $605,876 $630,111 $655,315 $681,528 Fare Revenue** $470,173 $488,980 $508,539 $528,880 $550,036 Contracts/Other** $137,101 $142,585 $148,288 $154,220 $160,388 Total Revenue $2,004,747 $2,084,937 $2,168,334 $2,255,068 $2,345,270 Total Operating** $2,082,122 $2,165,407 $2,252,023 $2,342,104 $2,435,788 (Coralville Transit received $1,318,918 in CARES Act Funding in 2020 and $242,596 in CRRSAA funding in 2021 to assist with COVID-19 effects on transit service) University of Iowa Cambus (4% annual increase) Funding Program FY2022 FY2023 FY2024 FY2025 FY2026 State Transit $780,373 $811,588 $844,052 $877,814 $912,926 Assistance Urbanized Area $701,162 $729,208 $758,377 $788,712 $820,260 Formula (5307) Special Needs*(5310) $171,715 $178,583 $185,727 $193,156 $200,882 Local Tax/Student Fees** $2,706,333 $2,814,586 $2,927,169 $3,044,256 $3,166,026 Fare Revenue $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 Contracts/Other** $30,583 $31,806 $33,078 $34,401 $35,778 Total Revenue $4,390,166 $4,565,771 $4,748,403 $4,938,339 $5,135,872 Total Operating** $4,241,107 $4,410,751 $4,587,181 $4,770,669 $4,961,495 (University of Iowa Cambus received $1,902,975 in CARES Act Funding in 2020 and $350,024 in CRRSAA funding in 2021 to assist with COVID-19 effects on transit service) 30 *5310 funding based on FY2020 data ** Based on FY2019 data/pre COVID-19 31 Attachment 1: Iowa City Area Transit Study Executive Summary Background The 2019-2020 Iowa City Area Transit Study, or ICATS, is the result of one year of public outreach, technical analysis, and service planning conducted by CAMBUS, Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit (the study agencies), and consultant staff. The final product of the ICATS is a fiscally constrained Preferred Alternative that makes detailed route-level recommendations for improving public transit in the Iowa City area. ICATS Goals Goals for the ICATS were developed based on public input collected through surveys and in -person outreach, as well as from study agency goals. The primary goals of the ICATS are to increase transit ridership, better collaborate across agencies, improve communication to riders, and take a regional approach to transit planning. Methodology The ICATS included in-depth analysis of existing conditions at the study agencies and in the Iowa City area. This analysis included a comprehensive review of local planning work, a review of agency key performance indicators, an analysis of the local market and the distribution of likely transit demand, and a route-by-route examination of ridership, on-time performance, running time, alignment, and capacity. Comprehensive ridership and on-time performance data was collected for all three agencies. This analysis is included in Chapters 3 through Chapter 6. The ICATS also includes analysis of best practices for transit infrastructure and transit fare policy, which are in Chapter 10 and Appendix D of this report, respectively. Public Outreach Three major phases of outreach were conducted as a part of the ICATS: an early fall onboard survey, a late fall series of in-person outreach events and survey, and a winter series of in-person outreach events and survey. The early fall onboard survey collected information on rider behaviors, the late fall outreach and survey collected information on community visions and goals for public transit, and the winter outreach collected feedback on three hypothetical scenarios for improving transit in the Iowa City area. Feedback collected on these three scenarios shaped the Preferred Alternative. Detailed information on and results from outreach work are in Chapter 8. 32 Recommendations The ICATS Preferred Alternative for service was developed using public input, market conditions, and existing ridership data. Initially, three scenarios were developed that represent different principles of route planning and areas of emphasis. Following a public outreach and comment period on these three scenarios, a fiscally constrained Preferred Alternative was developed to address operational issues, future growth, industry-standard best practices for route design, and established project goals. The most significant improvements made by the Preferred Alternative are listed below by improvement category: Increasing frequency on core routes ▪ 15-minute peak period service on Iowa City Transit’s most popular route, the Oakcrest, and 15 - minute all-day service on the Iowa City Transit Southside Downtown Shuttle ▪ 20-minute peak period service on the Iowa City Transit Mall route to Kirkwood Community College and South Iowa City ▪ 20-minute all-day CAMBUS service between the Hawkeye Commuter Lot, Aspire at West Campus, the University of Iowa hospitals, and downtown Iowa City ▪ Iowa City Transit Saturday service improvements Simplifying routes ▪ Restructuring Iowa City Transit routes with a single set of alignments, instead of operating two different alignments for each route ▪ Shifting routes to arterials so riders can easily understand where a bus will take them ▪ Simpler CAMBUS service to and from the Hawkeye Commuter Lot ▪ A route numbering system to make the three systems easier for riders to use Addressing on-time performance problems ▪ Shifting Coralville Transit and Iowa City Transit routes to major arterials for improved speed and reliability ▪ Eliminating time-consuming and dangerous deviations into parking lots ▪ Shifting service off roads with operational problems, such as Lee Street in Manville Heights, and off roads with congestion, such as Newton Road near the hospitals Providing more direct service to popular destinations ▪ Better connections to major shopping destinations that eliminate the need to transfer vehicles for many riders ▪ Direct, all-day service between Iowa River Landing and downtown Iowa City ▪ A one-seat ride from the Pheasant Ridge neighborhood to the Walmart-anchored commercial area south of Highway 6 ▪ Shifting route design away from ineffective loop routes to bi-directional alignments ▪ A one-seat ride from downtown Iowa City to commercial destinations in Coralville ▪ Direct service to and from the Hawkeye Commuter Lot 33 Attachment 2: Phase III Passenger Rail Study Executive Summary 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 Attachment 3: Johnson County SEATS Rider Survey 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 Attachment 4: MPOJC Long-Range Transportation Plan Metro Transit Survey Fact Sheet 62 Attachment 5: Citizen Transportation Committee Barriers to Employment Survey - November 2015 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Citizen Transportation Committee Community Transportation Survey - 2015 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 Attachment 6: PTP Meeting Agendas/Minutes/Public Hearing Notice • Passenger Transportation Plan Committee Meeting Agenda: January 7, 2021 88 • Passenger Transportation Plan Committee Meeting Minutes: January 7, 2021 FINAL MINUTES MPOJC PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN UPDATE (TAG) TUESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2021, 4:00 PM ZOOM MEETING PLATFORM INTRODUCTION OF STAFF Brad Neumann and Frank Waisath - Associate Transportation Planners for MPOJC IDENTIFY THOSE PARTICIPATING Vicky Robrock - Director of Parking and Transportation (Coralville), member of Johnson County SEATS Advisory Committee Darian Nagle-Gamm - Iowa City Transportation Services Director Brian McClatchey - CAMBUS Manager Angela McConville - Senior Center Commission member Kelly Schneider - Johnson County Mobility Coordinator Lynette Jacoby - Social Services Director, Johnson County Social Services Jeremy Endsley - Employment & Housing Case Manager, Shelter House, and Community Transportation Committee Austin Wu - University of Iowa Student Liaison Maya Sims - Community Transportation Committee, University of Iowa Payton Colbert - Community Transportation Committee Yael Feder - Community Transportation Committee DESCRIPTION OF THE PTP Neumann explained that the Passenger Transportation Development Plan (PTP) is to be updated every 5 years by the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and covers the Iowa City Urbanized Area. This includes Tiffin, North Liberty, Coralville, Iowa City an d University Heights, as well as parts of Johnson County. The PTP is meant to coordinate planning efforts for federal transportation funding programs, while also incorporating federal requirements for coordinated planning efforts with public, private and human service transportation providers. The role of the MPO is to administer grants and federal funds to eligible entities. The PTP covers a five -year period that is intended to demonstrate where transportation needs exist, which can then be served by federal and state funding assistance programs. DISCUSSION OF CURRENT PTP Neumann explained that Section 3 of the PTP will be reviewed at this meeting, complete with updates and comments by the transit agencies. Priorities, goals, and objectives will be discus sed and added to the PTP at the meeting on January 21st. REVIEW OF PTP COORDINATION ISSUES 89 SERVICE NEEDS: LACK OF PUBLIC TRANSIT SERVICE DURING LATE NIGHT AND EARLY MORNING HOURS, SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, AND HOLIDAYS. Nagle-Gamm explained that this is a definite need for Iowa City transit. The service needs still exist, and City Council has requested that Iowa City Transit explore ways to extend weekday evening service, as well as adding Sunday services. A night -owl service was also discussed. Iowa City Transit expects to bring their changes and recommendations to the next City Council meeting. McClatchey commented that CAMBUS already provides these services. Robrock shared that Coralville has implemented new routes. PUBLIC TRANSIT MAY BE VERY INCONVENIENT FOR SOME DUE TO TIME CONSUMING RIDES ON PUBLIC TRANSIT. Nagle-Gamm explained that most of the recommendations that were produced from the Iowa City Area Transit Study are planning on being introduced to City Council for review and implementation. PUBLIC TRANSIT MAY NOT PROVIDE FREQUENT ENOUGH SERVICE TO CERTAIN EMPLOYMENT AND/OR SHOPPING CENTERS IN THE URBAN AREA OR SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES. Robrock explained that Coralville Transit had already established new routes using existing resources that address some of these service inconsistencies. McClatchey commented that CAMBUS has implemented all the recommendations that were provided in the Iowa City Area Transit Study. DISTRIBUTE MORE TRAINING AND EDUCATION MATERIAL TO POTENTIAL USERS OF PUBLIC TRANSIT. INCLUDING THE LIVABLE COMMUNITIES TRANSPORTATION BROCHURE. McClatchey mentioned that Schneider, the Johnson County Mobility Coordinator, was not present during the last PTP update, and her position did not exist at the time, which shows how the community has progressed. Schneider explained her current focus is working on educating individuals on how to use transit - oriented technology, especially seniors, and that she is currently training people virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic. McClatchey agreed that training is important and pointed out that virtual training could be done permanently to reach more individuals. EVALUATE THE NEED FOR FIXED ROUTE AND/OR DEMAND RESPONSE TRANSIT SERVICE TO TIFFIN. CONSIDER OPTIONS TO PAY FOR SERVICE. Neumann explained that Tiffin isn’t ready for fixed-route service yet due to a smaller population size. Eventually this will be necessary. EVALUATE NEED FOR ADDITIONAL BUS SHELTER FACILITIES, INCLUDING FUTURE SHELTERS IN NORTH LIBERTY AND TIFFIN. THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE BONGO PROGRAM MAY REDUCE THE NEED FOR MORE SHELTERS. REDUCED BUDGETS AND INCREASED MAINTENANCE COSTS ARE ALSO PROHIBITING THE PLACEMENT OF MORE SHELTERS. Neumann explained that there is funding in the budget for more bus shelters, and asked Nagle- Gamm how the process of installing bus shelters is going. Nagle-Gamm replied that Iowa City Transit has received funding from City Council to revitalize existing bus shelters and install new ones where needed. So far there have been 7 new shelters installed, but installations were put on hold due to new recommendations from the Iowa City Area Transit Study. Nagle-Gamm explained that they are currently working on implementing Phase II of constructing or revitalizing bus shelters, as well as improving amenities at the bus stops. McClatchey commented that CAMBUS has also increased their number of shelters and have started a program that upgrades shelters using a specified design. The number of amenities has also increased. Nagle-Gamm asked for clarification on the wording used, specifically “The implementation of the Bongo program may reduce the need for more shelters” 90 Neumann replied that the Bongo app was intended to allow users to track exactly when the bus arrived, which would in turn reduce wait times, therefore minimizing the need for bus shelters. Neumann asked how Bongo is working with the current transportation services. McClatchey mentioned that Bongo is no longer in use due to the expiration of the contract and the barriers associated with upgrading the system. Iowa City, Coralville, and CAMBUS have all decided to switch to the Transit App. Despite the more complicated design and functionality, it contains certain important features that were requested by the public. MORE PARK AND RIDE FACILITIES ARE NECESSARY TO REDUCE VEHICLE CONGESTION AND THE GROWING NEED FOR MORE PARKING IN THE DOWNTOWN IOWA CITY AREA AND AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Neumann explained that this was an issue that concerned the University of Iowa and CAMBUS mainly, and that park and rides haven’t been a priority among members of the general public. McClatchey mentioned that there has been little progression in the case of park and ride facilities and parking. There has been a recent study by the University of Iowa that addressed current and future needs for parking, that found the east side needs more parking facilities. Schneider asked how the App for the transit agencies was chosen and how it works. Nagle-Gamm explained that the DOT allowed the different transit systems to coordinate with Google Maps. The state requested that the transit agencies submit their route information, which was then digitized. This took approximately six months. CONSIDER THE NEED FOR A BUS/LIGHT RAIL SERVICE BETWEEN IOWA CITY URBANIZED AREA AND CEDAR RAPIDS. Neumann explained that there have been three studies performed over the past few years that determined that a light rail service was economical between Iowa City and North Liberty. The three studies are on the MPOJC website, and it is now up to the communities to determine whether a rail service is implemented. In the meantime, the I-380 bus is currently running. This bus travels to Cedar Rapids, making stops in Coralville and Iowa City. This service will continue until at least 2025, and at that time there will need to be discussions on how best to continue the service. Neumann also mentioned that ridership has decreased due to the Covid-19 pandemic, though rail service will hopefully continue to be considered by communities. EVALUATE BUSINESS DEMAND FOR TRANSPORTATION SERVICES OUTSIDE OF THE IOWA CITY URBANIZED AREA, INCLUDING RIVERSIDE CASINO AND AMANA. Neumann explained that this was previously an issue, however not much materialized. The issue dissipated due to lack of funding. Neumann explained that there have been van pool programs implemented, as well as ride-sharing. Transportation services to these areas should cont inue to be monitored. CONTINUE TO SUPPORT THE VOLUNTEER TRANSPORTATION COORDINATOR POSITION WITH ELDER SERVICES. THIS SERVICE TARGETS PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES THAT CANNOT UTILIZE FIXED ROUTE OR PARATRANSIT SERVICE. THIS POSITION COORDINATES A DOOR-THROUGH-DOOR SERVICE WITH THE SUPPORT OF THE LOCAL MEDICAL COMMUNITY. Neumann explained that the previous funding for this transportation service was unavailable, and asked Schneider for clarification. Schneider explained that the funding is now provided by t he United Way of Johnson & Washington Counties. The RSVP coordinator is named Erin Balvanz who helps facilitate the RSVP program that assists seniors in getting to their medical appointments. Schneider also explained that there is a lack of volunteers at t his time due to Covid-19 and assumes that ridership levels have decreased. She mentioned that the need itself is still present, despite the lack of volunteers. LACK OF BUS SHELTERS Already discussed earlier in the meeting. CONSIDER MORE PARTNERSHIPS IN ORDER TO PROVIDE LATE NIGHT, HOLIDAY, AND WEEKEND TRANSIT SERVICE Neumann referred to Nagle-Gamm to clarify if any partnerships are being considered to address these service inconsistencies. 91 Nagle-Gamm noted that certain scenarios are being discussed, including fixed-route, partnerships, and on-demand services. These scenarios will be outlined and presented to the City Council for review and recommendation. McClatchey asked if local taxis, Uber, or Lyft are being considered as potential partners. Nagle-Gamm confirmed that those are all companies that Iowa City Transit is considering. LACK OF AN ADA ACCESSIBLE VEHICLE FOR USE BY PRIVATE SECTOR FOR SERVICE AFTER FIXED ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT SERVICE HOURS END. Neumann asked Schneider to provide information o n Yellow Cab and how their services are working within the community. Schneider said that Yellow Cab set up a sister company called Yellow Transport, which provides accessible vehicles. However, the rates are very high, even for in-town transportation. McConville clarified that the rates were around $50 each way, $100 round-trip. Neumann mentioned that there will be a few weeks between now and the next meeting, which will allow some time for transit agencies to consider what types of amendments concerning service needs they would like to target in the next plan. McClatchey proposed looking at the transit study to see if anything new has emerged. Nagle-Gamm discussed bringing fares in alignment across the metro area. Neumann agreed to both McClatchey and Nagle-Gamm’s comments, adding that any other service need suggestions would be welcomed and added at the next meeting. FLEET NEEDS • THE SPARE RATIOS FOR THE THREE TRANSIT SYSTEMS IN THE URBANIZED AREA INCLUDING FIXED ROUTE AND PARATRANSIT BUSES. Neumann mentioned that all three transit agencies have received new buses over the past 7 years in conjunction with the state of Iowa. All the buses that run in the Iowa City Urbanized Area are on a list that tracks the mileage and age of the buses and a formula is used to identify which buses require replacement. Neumann asked how many buses each transit agency has received in the past 5-7 years. Nagle-Gamm replied that Iowa City Transit has received eleven buses over the past 5-7 years, and that four new electric buses will be arriving later this year. They have also obtained one expansion paratransit bus and one replacement paratransit bus, which are used by Johnson County SEATS. Nagle-Gamm mentioned that Iowa City Transit is the first to use state grant money to fund electric buses. Robrock said Coralville Transit has received 4 or 5 40-foot buses and 2 paratransit buses. McClatchey replied that CAMBUS has obtained 4 full-size buses and 1 paratransit bus. THE LOCAL HUMAN SERVICE AGENCIES HAVE LIMITED FLEETS AND LITTLE FUNDING TO EXPAND OR REPAIR EXISTING FLEETS. MANY AGENCIES MUST RELY ON PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION, DONATIONS, OR RESORT TO USING PERSONAL VEHICLES WHEN TRANSPORTING CLIENTS. Neumann explained that there is not a lot of information to determine how to address human service agencies’ transportation needs at this time but it continues to be a concern. AS THE NEED FOR SERVICE GROWS SO DOES THE NEED FOR EQUIPMENT. NEWER AND MORE EFFICIENT BUSES ARE NEEDED IN ORDER TO KEEP COSTS DOWN. NEW ROUTES ARE ANTICIPATED WHERE EXPANSION WILL BE NECESSARY Iowa City transit will be receivin g four new electric buses in 2021. Neumann mentioned that transit agencies are slowly transitioning to electric bus fleets. McClatchey commented that an impediment to electric buses is the Iowa Avenue Bridge. This is because the cost of raising the bridge for the railroad is extremely high, and it can’t be lowered because of the water table. There needs to be more studies done in order to determine what the next step is. Nagle-Gamm explained that one of the solutions is to find shorter buses so that they can clear the bridge easier. If the buses are too high, this will affect access to established routes. FACILITY NEEDS Neumann explained Coralville’s intermodal facility has been in operation since 2015. The funding for the intermodal facility was through a federal grant. Robrock mentioned that Phase II renovations are underway. 92 Neumann addressed Iowa City Transit’s facility on Riverside Drive which is due for renovation. Funding has been difficult to obtain, but the facility is in need of an upgrade to be able to store larger buses as well as support the charging stations for the upcoming electric buses. CAMBUS’ facility renovations have been completed wi8th state grants. McClatchey explained that the southern addition has been expanded in order to store twelve buses, and there has also been funding for redesign and renovation of exterior and interior spaces, as well as door replacements. McClatchey mentioned there may be more expansions in the future, including a dedicated maintenance space and a bus-washing station. THE NEED FOR ADDITIONAL BUS STOP SHELTERS WAS IDENTIFIED BY THE JOHNSON COUNTY LIVABLE COMMUNITIES TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE AND THE JOHNSON COUNTY SEATS PARATRANSIT COMMITTEE. The need for bus shelters was already addressed earlier in the meeting. CAMBUS CONTINUES TO MONITOR THE CHANGING PARKING SITUATION DUE TO THE MANY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS TAKING PLACE ON CAMPUS The parking situation was already addressed earlier in the meeting. STATUS OF PAST PRIORITIES/STRATEGIES Neumann explained that this list is outdated and much of the projects and goals have been completed and/or addressed. Neumann reminded everyone to bring their priorities and objectives ideas to the next meeting. The updates have been valuable as they assist the committee in knowing where their priorities should be and what they should be working towards. Neumann asked for any questions or comments. Schneider asked if the larger size buses were necessary, and if a mid-size fleet would be possible. McClatchey explained that CAMBUS has 4 30-foot buses, which are used in fixed-route service for lighter demand times, especially weekends and late night service. They are also used for paratransit services. The 40-foot buses provide the most utility. Smaller sized buses have smaller up-front capital savings, and simultaneously result in limits to service. Both larger and mid -size buses require the same operating and maintenance costs. CAMBUS has no plans to expand their smaller fleet, except for paratransit services. Schneider asked McClatchey if CAMBUS’ current fleet size meets demand. McClatchey responded affirmatively. ADJOURMENT Neumann adjourned the meeting at 5:00 PM. 93 • Passenger Transportation Plan Committee Meeting Agenda: January 21, 2021 94 • Passenger Transportation Plan Committee Meeting Minutes: January 21, 2021 FINAL MINUTES MPOJC PASSENGER TRANSPORTATION DEVELOPMENT PLAN UPDATE (TAG) TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2021, 4:00 PM CITY OF IOWA CITY – ZOOM MEETING PLATFORM INTRODUCTION OF STAFF Brad Neumann and Frank Waisath - Associate Transportation Planners for MPOJC IDENTIFY THOSE PARTICIPATING Vicky Robrock - Director of Parking and Transportation for City of Coralville Brian McClatchey - CAMBUS Manager Kelly Schneider - Johnson County Mobility Coordinator Brock Grenis - East Central Iowa Council of Governments Payton Colbert - Community Transportation Committee Maya Sims - Community Transportation Committee, University of Iowa Darian Nagle-Gamm - Iowa City Transportation Services Director Yael Feder - Community Transportation Committee Erin Balvanz - RSVP Director, United Way of Johnson & Washington Counties Sabri Sky - University of Iowa QUESTIONS OR ADDITIONAL DISCUSSION REGARDING THE JANUARY 7, 2021 MEETING Neumann discussed the results of the last meeting, including the review of Section 3 of the plan, which contained fleet needs, service needs, facility upgrades, and the status of past priorities and objectives. DISCUSS OBJECTIVES OF JANUARY 21, 2021 MEETING Neumann explained that this meeting is intended to review and update the strategies and priorities that are contained in Section 4 of the PTP. DEVELOP NEW 5-YEAR AND LONG-TERM PRIORITIES AND STRATEGIES 5 YEAR PRIORITIES: Neumann explained that the 5-year priorities outlined below were approved by the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board in 2014, and that there will now need to be modifications to these priorities to reflect current developments within the Iowa City Urbanized Area. Continue to meet with the PTP Committee when necessary and at least twice each year prior to updating the PTP. Include business/industry representatives. Neumann explained he will include the representatives of the four transportation committees in this statement, in order to provide clarification. Continue to develop new transit facilities for Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and Cambus. Neumann noted that Iowa City Transit is looking for funding to re place its Riverside Drive facility and asked whether Coralville or Cambus have any ongoing renovations or plans to update their facilities within the next five years. McClatchey replied that Cambus is continuing to upgrade and renovate their maintenance facility. Robrock mentioned that lack of funding has affected the ability to initiate and complete Phase II of Coralville’s intermodal and transit facility, but the project should stay on the five-year priority list. Neumann also mentioned the bus shelter renovations and installments, and that those will be specified and detailed in the upcoming PTP. Continue to update and modernize transit vehicles and equipment. 95 Neumann mentioned that Iowa City Transit has ordered 4 new electric buses, which will be in use sometime later this year. Evaluate existing service and coordination of both fixed route and paratransit service; include current and new developments with low income housing and/or persons with disabilities. Neumann explained that this applies to the Iowa City Area Transit Study that was performed for all three of the transit agencies. Neumann mentioned that this priority will stay in the PTP. Promote Bongo and trip-maker programs throughout the urbanized area. Neumann explained that Bongo is no longer in use, due to the contract expiring. Instead, the Transit App is available for those who use public transportation and the app encompasses all three transit agencies. Google Maps is also used frequently. Neumann asked Schneider what transit service applications she uses in educating the public. Schneider replied that Google Maps is helpful in planning longer trips, but that she recommends individuals use the Transit App if they intend to use the local bus agencies. Evaluate the need for a lift-equipped cab for use during fixed route off hours. Nagle-Gamm explained that this service is currently being examined to determine where services are required and to design the operations using a lift-equipped service. Reevaluate Iowa City Transit’s Cab Ride Program for workers that need late night and weekend transit service; include Coralville Transit. Neumann explained that Nagle-Gamm is in the process of researching partnerships that would provide this service, and this was discussed in the previous meeting. Extend bus routes to more commercial areas in the urbanized area Investigate the need for more bus shelters in the urbanized area and develop an adopt-a-shelter program. Neumann explained that this was addressed in the Route Study for the three transit agencies, and that this avenue is actively being pursued and implemented. The study allowed for an in -depth analysis of the need for bus shelters and adopt-a-shelter programs, as well as including public input in order to assess community needs. Iowa City Transit is also involved in replacing and updating bus shelters. Nagle-Gamm recommended omitting the word “investigate” and replacing it with “Bus shelter revitalization and expansion program” in order to be more specific. Nagle -Gamm also mentioned that Iowa City Transit is not actively pursuing adopt-a-shelter programs and is preferring to address bus shelter needs either internally or by utilizing external partnerships. Evaluate bus/light rail service between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids. Neumann explained that the light rail service was considered before the current I -380 bus was implemented. Neumann asked Grenis to elaborate on the I-380 bus service between Iowa City and Cedar Rap ids, as well as any other information he could provide. Grenis explained that the Iowa Department of Transportation had implemented a bus service once a study determined there was demand for a transportation service that travelled between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids. Neumann asked how long the I-380 bus service would continue to be funded through the Iowa Department of Transportation. Grenis replied until 2023, however this could change depending on the types and amounts of funding the Iowa Department of Transportation has available. The Iowa Department of Transportation construction and project schedule may also affect this date. Neumann explained that because the funding is within the next five years, transportation between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids will continue to be monitored and addressed in the PTP update. 96 Neumann asked Grenis how Covid-19 has impacted I-380 bus service. Grenis replied that initially ridership dropped below 30% of levels before the pandemic, but that it has slowly grown to be an estimated 150 - 200 people per day. McClatchey commented that the transit agencies were in support of continuing the I-380 bus service, and the priority should be focused on strategizing how to address any future changes in service. Neumann agreed, and explained that there have been three studies completed that involve the constructing of a light rail service. The first study analyzed a route that travelled to Cedar Rapids, while the second and third studies prioritized routes that provided service to North Liberty. Neumann mentioned that service to Cedar Rapids through light rail is not within the five -year window, however there will most likely be discussions surrounding the prospects of implementing a light rail service to North Liberty. For this reason, Neumann explained that he would prefer to keep light rail service within the five -year priority window. Neumann asked the group if there were any suggestions on projects or priorities that should be added to the five-year priority list. Nagle-Gamm suggested including “Implement recommendations from the Iowa City Transit Study.” Nagle-Gamm clarified that this wording would acknowledge the numerous recommendations and analyses contained in the Iowa City Transit study. Nagle-Gamm explained that the Iowa City Transit Study was written with a five-year timeframe in mind and suggested adding a line that mentioned this as well. Neumann asked Endsley if he had any questions or comments. Endsley replied that his organization was mainly concerned with adding more signage and amenities at bus stops that would inform riders of the bus routes. He included the possibility of implementing ticket machines and suggested administering strategies that resulted in more consistent bus schedules. Endsley also suggested exploring avenues that increase ridership by invoking a dialogue with riders to address discomforts or aversions to utilizing public transit and then making modifications with that information. Neumann asked if these points were addressed in the Iowa City Transit Study. Nagle-Gamm replied affirmatively, explaining that there was a preliminary survey that captured rider preferences and suggestions. Nagle-Gamm explained that Iowa City Transit is in the process of partnering with a marketing firm that addresses much of the information and communication issues that Endsley mentioned. Nagle-Gamm commented that Iowa City Transit also has a long-term priority of doubling ridership within the next 10 years, as well as enabling a shift of 55% of vehicle trips to more sus tainable modes of transportation, including using transit, biking, walking, etc. Neumann explained he would like to include these points in the five-year priority list. Schneider asked for clarification on the difference between five-year and long-term priorities. Neumann replied that the long-term priorities have an unspecified goal, and are meant to be completed sometime in the future. Schneider explained that she would like to add that Iowa City should consider coordinating with other human service organizations, and that there may be a funding opportunity to extend resources to those organizations. McClatchey commented that sustainability should also be addressed and added in some form. Schneider mentioned a list of pilots that were awarded involving payment systems for transit. She saw that the Transit app has the technology incorporated in its software to allow ticketing through the app itself. Schneider thought that adding a line about exploring innovative technology would be beneficial to add to the list of priorities. Neumann mentioned adding this under the ‘Continue to update and modernize transit vehicles and equipment’ priority. Nagle-Gamm commented that mobile ticketing is something Iowa City Transit is interested in and actively pursuing to be available in the future. McClatchey asked if simplifying the fare system in general was an issue for Coralville and Iowa City Transit. 97 Nagle-Gamm agreed this was an issue, and that it was outlined in the Transit Study, specifically that Coralville and Iowa City Transit fares should be more aligned. LONG TERM PRIORITIES: Distribute human services/school/senior rider education materials. Schneider mentioned her current focus is teaching individuals the technological aspects of transit. Neumann replied he would like to move this line to the five-year priority list. Develop programs for senior riders through Johnson County Livable Communities Senior Transportation Committee. Schneider explained she will contact a member associated with this committee and get back to Neumann. Develop park-and-ride programs in existing and planned intermodal facilities. Neumann explained that these facilities are currently implemented and operating in the urbanized area. He suggested leaving it in long-term priorities, but to mention the study that was done as well. Develop light rail passenger service within the urbanized area. Neumann explained moving this to the five-year priority. Extend bus routes to residential areas outside of the urbanized area. Neumann explained that this was added to service residents that resided just outside the city limits. McClatchey noted that extending bus routes wasn’t an option and recommended changing this point to read “Consider extension of transit services to residential areas outside of the urban area,” would be beneficial. Establish park-and-ride facilities outside of the urbanized area; additional rolling stock will be required. Already discussed earlier in the meeting. Look for corporate partners in transportation programs. Nagle-Gamm mentioned that partnerships may be pursued to address fare -free programs. Endsley asked about the night ride service as a source for potential funding. Nagle-Gamm replied that this was a potential for funding. Endsley noted that mobile ticketing isn’t always available for low-income riders. He mentioned adding a ticket machine or other ticket amenities. Neumann recommended moving this point to the five-year priority list. Develop regional Amtrak rail service to Chicago. Neumann explained that Amtrak rail service to Chicago may be a possibility under the new administration and suggested that this be moved to five-year priority status. McClatchey agreed and asked if ‘Develop’ was an appropriate term. McClatchey suggested “Consider regional Amtrak rail service to Chicago if opportunities present” Neumann agreed that this should be changed. 98 DEVELOP GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Neumann explained that he will update the goals and objectives to reflect tonight’s and last meeting’s discussions. He noted that the goals in the last PTP are consistent with current transportation goals, but some re-wording needs to be done. Neumann asked the group if they had any comments or recommendations concerning goals and objectives. Goal: Extend late night, Sunday, and holiday service to commercial areas. Objective: Evaluate private transit or SEATS service options since Iowa City Transit and Coralville Transit will no longer provide paratransit service on Sundays. Objective: Pursue a joint venture with a local cab company to provide ADA accessible cabs and cab -ride program. Since New Freedom grant funding is no longer available, identify new funding sources. Goal: Provide new and/or expand transit facilities and equipment. Objective: Plan for new transit storage/maintenance facility for Iowa City Transit. Include quality standards for the work place. A location study has been completed. Completion of a feasibility study is scheduled for FY2014 with construction planned for FY2016. FTA is encouraging Iowa City Transit to pursue federal funding for a new facility. Objective: Plan for new and/or expanded transit maintenance facility for Cambus. This would be a joint effort within the university. Objective: Consider joint projects for the three fixed route transit operations, including equipment upgrades. The Bongo system and fare box equipment replacement have been completed. Objective: Evaluate placement of additional enclosed bus stop shelters near human services organizations, neighborhoods, and future bus routes making the use of the fixed route bus system more convenient for human services clients. Include AVL/Nextbus program in shelters and consider partnerships for maintenance. Goal: Extend existing bus routes or create new routes. Objective: Talk to developers about future developments for low income and/or persons with disabilities and plan for bus service facilities and schedules. Objective: Coralville Transit will continue to explore expansion possibilities of e xisting routes to commercial areas north of Coral Ridge Mall/I-80, the Iowa River Landing, and North Liberty. The North Liberty Transportation Committee is currently discussing expanded service within North Liberty. Objective: Iowa City Transit will continue to explore the expansion of existing routes to better serve the commercial areas on South Riverside Drive, Pepperwood, Sycamore Mall, downtown Iowa City, and the new Johnson County Administration/Human Services Campus. Iowa City Transit is working w ith MPOJC in developing a route evaluation program as well as considering a more detailed comprehensive study. Objective: Expand existing bus routes to residential areas just outside the urbanized area. Consider school and childcare activities. The City of tiffin has expressed interest in fixed route transit service. Objective: Provide new routes for specific job access; include commercial and industry partners that provide a large number of jobs that have late or shifting hours. A funding source will need to be found after the elimination of the JARC funding program. Objective: Work with ECICOG and the Corridor MPO (Cedar Rapids) in evaluating the need for a bus/light rail service between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids. Both MPOs and ECICOG are pur suing 99 funding options for a comprehensive study to identify transportation needs between Iowa City and Cedar Rapids. Goal: Provide more transportation related training and education programs. Objective: PTP Committee will continue to meet and consider expanding membership to include business/industry. Objective: Continue to upgrade and coordinate the Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and Cambus Trip-Maker Programs, Bongo system, and educational videos. 5310 Funds Each year, Coralville Transit and Iowa City Transit receive Special Needs Section 5310 funding for elderly persons and persons with disabilities. This year (FY2014) the funding levels increased with the addition of New Freedom funds to the 5310 formula funds. Both transit providers direct these funds to their paratransit service contract with Johnson County SEATS. In FY2014, Iowa City Transit received $113,742 and Coralville Transit received $32,654. These same funding levels are anticipated for FY2015. CAMBUS also receives Special Needs Section 5310 funding each year. Since Cambus does not contract for paratransit service they will continue to use the funding for bus replacement in their Bionic Bus fleet and for the operation of the program. Cambus received $166,460 in FY2014 and anticipates the same funding level in FY2015. Neumann noted that funding may be different due to any recent projects or developments for each transit agency. DISCUSS DRAFT AND FINAL PTP SUBMITTAL DATES AND MPOJC BOARD APPROVAL Neumann mentioned that the PTP draft is due early February, and the Board will review and approve the document in March. The final document will be due in May 2021. QUESTIONS No questions were asked, and Neumann mentioned that any questions or comments can be directed to him through email. ADJOURNMENT Meeting adjourned at 5:00 PM. 100 • Public Input/Public Notice regarding PTP Public Hearing: MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board meeting, March 31, 2021 Public hearing notice regarding approval of the Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County Passenger Transportation Plan (PTP) The Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) is requesting public input regarding the Passenger Transportation Plan (PTP). This is the 5-year update of the PTP, the current PTP can be found on the MPOJC website at www.mpojc.org. The goals, priorities, and recommended projects will be presented to the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board for consideration at their March 31, 2021 meeting beginning at 4:30 p.m. The meeting will be a remote/electronic meeting. For information on how to participate in the remote/electronic meeting, contact MPOJC at 319-356-5235 or email brad-neumann@iowa-city.org. The PTP is intended to coordinate planning efforts for federal transportation funding programs and to demonstrate where there are transportation needs that can be served by both Federal and State funding assistance programs. The PTP incorporates federal requirements for coordinated planning efforts for both public transit and human service transportation, as well as address needs-based project justification. The PTP is required by the Iowa Department of Transportation of eighteen Regional Planning Affiliations (RPA’s) and nine Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPO’s), which includes MPOJC. MPOJC provides planning and grant administration services to three fixed route transit providers in the Iowa City Urbanized Area, including Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and the University of Iowa Cambus. Please contact Brad Neumann by phone at 319-356-5235 or by email at brad-neumann@iowa- city.org with any questions regarding the MPOJC Passenger Transportation Plan, or to request any disability-related accommodations or language interpretation services for the March 31, 2021 MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board meeting. • Agenda/minutes from MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board meeting- March 31, 2021 MINUTES DRAFT MPOJC URBANIZED AREA POLICY BOARD WEDNESDAY, MARCH 31, 2021 - 4:30 PM ZOOM MEETING PLATFORM MEMBERS PRESENT: Iowa City: Pauline Taylor, John Thomas, Janice Weiner Johnson County: Rod Sullivan University Heights: Louise From North Liberty: Terry Donahue, Chris Hoffman Coralville: Meghann Foster Tiffin: Steve Berner University of Iowa: Erin Shane ICCSD: J.P. Claussen STAFF PRESENT: Kent Ralston, Brad Neumann, Emily Bothell, Sarah Walz, Frank Waisath OTHERS PRESENT: Catherine Cutler (Iowa DOT), James Hughes 101 1. CALL TO ORDER Donahue called the remote meeting (pursuant to Iowa Code Section 21.8) to order at 4:3 0 PM. a. Recognize alternates JP Clauson was present for Ruthina Malone for the school district. b. Consider approval of meeting minutes Motion to approve was made by From, Thomas seconded. The motion carried unanimously. c. Set next Board meeting date, time and location The next meeting was tentatively set for Wednesday, May 26th. 2. PUBLIC DISCUSSION OF ANY ITEM NOT ON THE AGENDA None 3. ADMINISTRATION a. Consider action regarding participation in the ‘Federal-Aid-Swap’ whereby State funding could replace Federal funding for local road/bridge projects Ralston explained that in 2018 House File 203 was signed into law, permitting the Iowa Transportation Commission to allow what is commonly referred to as a Federal Aid Swap, where road and bridge projects that would’ve been funded through the MPO with federal funds can be funded instead with state funds. For the past thre e years, the TTAC has recommended opting into the swap. However, after lengthy discussions, this board has decided to opt out of the swap in the same three years out of concern for Davis Bacon wages, worker safety, and lack of data showing benefits of the swap. The bistate regional commission of the quad cities and MPOJC are the only two MPOs in the state currently opting out of the swap. Similar to previous years, the Iowa DOT will assume participation unless specifically opted out. The DOT has not produce d any cost-savings for opting in but have mentioned that the project timeline has been streamlined by six months, which would help produce some savings through staff time saved. Opting in only effects STBG funds, which has been on average $7 million dollar s. Opting in does not affect TAP dollars. The TTAC unanimously recommended participating in the swap. Ralston opened the floor to questions, noting that Cathy Cutler from the DOT is on the call to help answer questions. Taylor explained that three years a go the UAPB decided to opt out because there was a lack of information about the financial benefits of opting in. Taylor expressed concern that a faster pace isn’t necessarily beneficial, as it could lead to waste or safety problems. Thomas questioned the impacts of funding on many issues. A report from the US Government Accountability Office prepared in October 2020 found that impacts of the swap could not be definitively determined. Fifteen states have opted out of the swap, and Iowa uses the swap more than other states, with about 18% of projects including the swap in their contracts. Thomas stated that he would like to understand the impacts on the state prevailing wage. Foster stated that this issue was the first thing she voted on when she joined the MPO board, and she will continue to choose to opt out because of her concerns about wages and workers. Foster added that the board has asked about cost-benefits for three years and is curious why this information is hard to report back. 102 Ralston explained that the MPO directors meeting discussed this topic last week. Stu Anderson, director of systems planning, said that cost-benefits of the swap would be a priority question this year. Anderson spoke to the UAPB three years ago and explained that it was dif ficult to quantify the effects of the swap. From stated that she’d voted to opt in the last three years due to her engineer’s assessment that increased time and cost for federal funding makes it difficult for small cities to obtain funding. Taylor moved to opt out of the swap. Sullivan seconded. From and Berner voted against opting out. Shane abstained. The motion carried with 7 voting to opt-out, 2 voting against opting-out, and 1 abstention. 4. TRANSPORTATION PLANNING a. Consider approval of the Locally Determined Projects list for the MPOJC FY2022 Transportation Planning Work Program Ralston stated that each spring the MPO compiles a list of transportation planning work program projects for the upcoming fiscal year, as required by the FHWA and Iowa DOT. More importantly, the work program schedules projects locally. The existing list of projects was attached to the meeting agenda and will be augmented with regular occurring projects and state and federal transportation planning work before the next meeting for final work program approval. The TTAC unanimously recommended approval at their March meeting. Thomas asked if project number four on Mormon Trek Boulevard will include a speed study as well as travel time. Ralston stated that the four to three lane conversion two years ago made engineering staff want to know how corridor travel times were affected. Speeds will be collected. Motion to approve was made by Weiner, Hoffman seconded. The motion carried unanimously. b. Consider approval of MPOJC Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) and Transportation Alternative Program (TAP) funding allocations Neumann explained that the Iowa DOT has provided the MPO with funding targets of $7.38 million for STBG, and $520,000 for TAP funding. All of these will be programed in the TIP FY25-26. Four entities requested just under $17 million in STBG funding for six different applications and $500,000 in TAP funding requests in one application. Two applications: Coralville’s Heartland Drive project and part of Iowa City’s Highway 6 Trail project are not in the current LRTP, but have applied for the next LRTP, and will be considered for approval next spring. Each project, its scoring, and funding requested was presented by Neumann and Bothell from highest score to lowest score. At the TTAC meeting, the Iowa City Hwy 6 Trail project was recommended at $520,000, even though it submitted for $500,000, in order to use up all TAP funds. Neumann presented the TTAC recommendations for each project. He explained that Iowa City withdrew their Dodge Street project at this meeting to focus on funding of Taft Ave Project. Coralville’s Highway 6 and Deer Creek Road project score was amended in a seven to six vote to award seven additional points to the safety category after Coralville presented additional information about the intersection. Both RTBC and TTAC recommended funding the Highway 6 Trail project at full $520,000 value. One letter from Megan Alter of the south district neighborhood association approved of the project because it improves safety and increases pedestrian access to the neighborhood. Neumann stated that the board may amend project scores, scores are only one thing to consider when approving funding, and funding cannot be awarded based on community population. 103 Motion to approve the STBG funding recommendations was made by Taylor, Meghann seconded. The motion carried unanimously. Motion to approve the TAP funding recommendations was made by Hoffman, Sullivan seconded. The motion carried unanimously. c. Public Hearing and consideration of approval of the MPOJC Passenger Transportation Plan Neumann explained that it has been awhile since the MPOJC has updated a Passenger Transportation Plan (PTP), but it is required by the Iowa DOT to coordinate planning of tran sit-related funding programs. The PTP addresses needs-based project justification and is required to be updated every five years, so this update is for FY22-27. The MPO worked with four existing local transportation committees, including the Johnson County Livable Communities Transportation Committee, the Johnson County SEATs Advisory Committee, the Citizens Transportation Committee, and the Johnson County Mobility Coordinator Advisory Committee. These committees reviewed past priorities and recent developm ents and developed a list of needs for service, fleet, and facilities and strategies, goals, and objectives for the next five years. This update was submitted to the PTP committee members for review as well as the Iowa DOT. Many of the priorities and strat egies depend on the implementation of the recommendations from the Iowa City Area Transit Study that was recently completed. Late night and weekend service, upgrades to facilities and technology, training and education, and regional service options remain priorities. The federal funding discussed in the PTP comes from Section 5310 ADA funding, apportioned to transit agencies by the Iowa DOT. All three area agencies have chosen to continue to use the funding for ADA Paratransit Services. Neumann stated that it has been seven years, not five, since the last update, and opened the floor to questions and a public hearing. No public comments were made at this time. Motion to approve was made by Thomas, Sullivan seconded. The motion carried unanimously. d. Consider approval of local transit agency safety performance targets Neumann explained that Public Transportation Agency Safety Plans are now required of all recipients of federal transit administration funding. This includes Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and Cambus. The three agencies have each developed plans promoting comprehensive procedures for managing safety, including safety performance measures such as fatalities, injuries, safety events, and system reliability based on data trends over r ecent years. Rules require the MPO to adopt performance measures for safety. The TTAC recommended the approval of the performance measures. Hoffman moved to approve the performance targets. Weiner seconded. The motion carried unanimously. e. Update regarding the MPOJC FY2022 Transit Program of Projects Neumann explained that each year the three local transit agencies are required by FTA to develop a program of projects, identifying proposed projects funded with federal funds. The Iowa DOT consolidated funding application and FY22-25 transportation improvement program will both include these projects. There is no need for approval from the board currently, as the agencies develop these projects independently and include them in their consolidated funding appl ication, which requires public hearing at a city council meeting. These projects are only included in the agenda for review because the board provides Section 5307 funding. Neumann opened the floor to questions. f. Update on the MPOJC Long Range Transportation Plan revision process 104 Bothell explained that the MPO has been busy scoring transportation projects submitted by each of the communities, gathering data on performance measures, and gathering public input. The MPO released a survey February 11th for all those that live, work, attend school, or do business in Johnson County. The survey was designed to understand respondents’ travel patterns and determine changes or improvements to implement to make travel across the metro easier. The survey was open for a month and collected just over 600 responses to be used at future public meetings and in the Long - Range Transportation Plan document. Bothell stated that the MPO has also created a virtual map in lieu of an in -person open house to provide project locations and receive input. The map will also be open for a month, closing April 16 th. Bothell presented the virtual map and explained that the link is available to the public on the MPO website with thorough instructions on viewing information and providing inpu t. The MPO plans to host a series of public meetings beginning in April and extending through the fall to provide additional opportunities for feedback. Chris commented that the virtual map is a great tool and thanked staff for putting it together. Ralsto n agreed and added that the map includes projects the UAPB approved for funding. Weiner also praised the transition from in-person workshops to virtual using this tool. 5. OTHER BUSINESS a. None 6. ADJOURNMENT Motion to adjourn was made by Taylor; Sullivan seconded. Meeting adjourned by Donahue at 5:14 PM. 105 Attachment 7: Transit Inventory • Iowa City Transit Fleet Inventory Report/Odometer Report 106 107 • Coralville Transit Fleet Inventory Report/Odometer Report 108 • University of Iowa Cambus Transit Fleet Inventory Report/Odometer Report UNIVERSITY OF IOWA- CAMBUS VEHICLE INVENTORY 12/31/2016 Cambus Year of License Plate Vehicle Ident. Number ID Number Vehicle Descrip.Manuf.Manufacturer Model Number (V.I.N.) 11 Transit Bus 2006 Optima LFB29 108534 1Z9B6B5526W216368 30 ft. 13 Transit Bus 2000 Orion Orion II 117079 1VH2A5D26Y6200201 Mini-bus 14 Transit Bus 2013 Gillig G27E102N2 Bus #1412264315GGE2713D1092594 30 ft. 15 Transit Bus 2013 Gillig G27E102N2 Bus #1412264415GGE2715D1092595 30 ft. 16 Transit Bus 2013 Gillig G27E102N2 Bus #1412264515GGE2717D1092596 30 ft. 17 Transit Bus 2020 RAM FrontRunner 3C7WRVLG3KE553454 Mini-bus 94 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112526 15GGD211981078636 40 ft. 95 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112527 15GGD211081078637 40 ft. 96 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112541 15GGD211281078638 40 ft. 97 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112542 15GGD211481078639 40 ft. 98 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112543 15GGD211081078640 40 ft. 99 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112544 15GGD211281078641 40 ft. 100 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112545 15GGD211481078642 40 ft. 101 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112546 15GGD211681078643 40 ft. 102 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112547 15GGD211881078644 40 ft. 103 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112589 15GGD211X81078645 40 ft. 104 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112590 15GGD211181078646 40 ft. 105 Transit Bus 2008 Gillig Low Floor 112591 15GGD211381078647 40 ft. 106 Transit Bus 2009 Gillig Low Floor 114892 15GGD271191176200 40 ft. 107 Transit Bus 2009 Gillig Low Floor 114893 15GGD217391176201 40 ft. 108 Transit Bus 2009 Gillig Low Floor 114894 15GGD271591176202 40 ft. 109 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LD1743 15GGD2713B1179315 40 ft. 110 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LD1744 15GGD2715B1179316 40 ft. 111 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LD1746 15GGD2717B1179317 40 ft. 112 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LD1747 15GGD2719B1179318 40 ft. 113 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LD1748 15GGD2710B1179319 40 ft. 114 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LDO971 15GGD2717B1179320 40 ft. 115 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LDO974 15GGD2719B1179321 40 ft. 116 Transit Bus 2011 Gillig Low Floor LDO980 15GGD2710B1179322 40 ft. 117 Transit Bus 2013 Gillig G27D102N4 Bus #11712264615GGD2716D1183245 40 ft. 118 Transit Bus 2013 Gillig G27D102N4 Bus #11812264715GGD2718D1183296 40 ft. 119 Transit Bus 2018 Gillig G27D102N4 Bus #11813136415GGD2717J3188697 40 ft. 120 Transit Bus 2019 Gillig G27D102N4 134879 15GGD271XK3194575 40 ft. 121 Transit Bus 2019 Gillig G27D102N4 134880 15GGD2711K3194576 40 ft. 122 Transit Bus 2019 Gillig G27D102N4 134881 15GGD2713K3194577 40 ft. Active Fleet: 35 Buses Retired - No longer operable. 9 Transit Bus 1998 Orion 2.501 LD1432 1VH249X76W6006075 12 Transit Bus 2000 Orion Orion II 117078 1VH2A5D21Y6200204 109 Attachment 8: Summary Table of FY2019 and FY2020 Performance Statistics/Public Transit: Coralville Transit Iowa City Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus 110 111 Attachment 9: Public Transit Maps Transit Routes and Stops 112 Existing Land Uses/Bus Routes