Loading...
Final FY2022-2025 TIP Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County Fiscal Year 2022-2025 TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM Iowa City Urbanized Area Adopted July 7, 2021 Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County Fiscal Years 2022-2025 TRANSPORTATION IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM For the Iowa City Urbanized Area Adopted by the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board July 7, 2021 MPO Transportation Planning Division Staff Kent Ralston, Director/Transportation Planner Emily Bothell , Senior Associate Transportation Engineering Planner Brad Neumann, Associate Transportation Planner Sarah Walz, Associate Transportation Planner Frank Waisath, Associate Transportation Planner Disclaimer: The MPO prepared this report with funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration and Federal Transit Administration, and in part through local matching funds of the MPO member entities. These contents are the responsibility of the MPOJC. The US Government and its agencies assume no liability for the contents of this report or for the use of its contents. Please call (319)356-5230 to obtain permission of use. Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County Urbanized Area Policy Board Meghann Foster Coralville City Council Laurie Goodrich Coralville City Council Laura Bergus Iowa City City Council Mazahir Salih Iowa City City Council Susan Mims Iowa City City Council Pauline Taylor Iowa City City Council John Thomas, Vice-Chair Iowa City City Council Janice Weiner Iowa City City Council Royceann Porter Johnson County Board of Supervisors Rod Sullivan Johnson County Board of Supervisors Chris Hoffman North Liberty City Council Terry Donahue, Chair Mayor, North Liberty Steve Berner Mayor, Tiffin Louise From Mayor, University Heights Erin Shane University of Iowa Ruthina Malone (non-voting) Iowa City School Board Transportation Technical Advisory Committee Kelly Hayworth City Administrator, Coralville Scott Larson City Engineer, Coralville Vicky Robrock Manager, Coralville Transit Darian Nagle-Gamm Director, Trans. Services, Iowa City Mark Rummel Asst. Dir. Trans. Services, Iowa City Ron Knoche Director, Public Works, Iowa City Jason Havel City Engineer, Iowa City Scott Sovers Asst. City Engineer, Iowa City Ryan Rusnak Planning Director, North Liberty Louise From Mayor, University Heights Doug Boldt City Administrator, Tiffin Greg Parker Johnson County Engineer Tom Brase Director, Johnson County SEATS Brian McClatchey Manager, University of Iowa Cambus David Kieft Business Manager, University of Iowa Sadie Greiner Facilities Management, U niversity of Iowa Bob Oppliger MPOJC Regional Trails & Bicycling Comm. Cathy Cutler (ex-officio) Transportation Planner, Iowa DOT Darla Hugaboom (ex-officio) Federal Highway Administration, Ames Brock Grenis (ex-officio) East Central Iowa Council of Governments Daniel Nguyen (ex-officio) Federal Transit Administration, Kansas City 1 | P a g e Table of Contents Table of Contents 1 Resolution of adoption: 2 Resolution certifying performance with federal transportation 3 planning process requirements: Certification of FTA financial capacity analysis statement: 4 Certification of compliance with private enterprise requirements: 5 Introduction: 6 Project status reports: 7 Regionally Significant Projects 10 Transportation Improvement Program projects: 11 TIP project locations: 18 Revising the Approved TIP: 19 MPO Public Input Process: 21 MPO project selection procedures: 29 Fiscal constraint of the TIP: 33 Federal Transit Administration financial analysis: 40 Performance Based Planning: 44 2 | P a g e 3 | P a g e 4 | P a g e 5 | P a g e 6 | P a g e Introduction The MPO of Johnson County Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) is the programming document for federally funded surface transportation improvements within the Iowa City Urbanized Area. This document includes transportation projects for all modes of surface transportation, including street and highway, transit, bicycle, and pedestrian projects. Transportation projects receiving federal funds are programmed in the Transportation Improvement Program. The following organizations have contributed to the preparation of this planning document: • City of Coralville • City of Iowa City • City of North Liberty • City of Tiffin • City of University Heights • Iowa Department of Transportation • Johnson County • University of Iowa 7 | P a g e Project Status Reports Program TPMS Location Awarded Total Status STBG 38310 North Liberty, Ranshaw Way, from Zeller St to Hawkeye Dr 2,576,000$ 6,697,600$ Construction STBG 36668 Iowa City, Benton St from Mormon Trek Blvd to Greenwood Dr 1,316,000$ 2,872,480$ Rolled over to FY22 STBG 33922 Iowa City, On American Legion Road, from Scott Blvd to Taft Avenue 3,608,000$ 9,152,000$ Construction STBG 25398 Iowa City, Burlington St median: Capitol St to Riverside Dr 1,011,000$ 1,433,120$ Completed in FY21 STBG 33923 Iowa City, IWV Rd from Hebl Ave to Hwy 218 930,000$ 3,517,280$ Construction TAP 39149 Iowa City, Hwy 6 Trail from Fairmeadows Blvd to Heinz Rd 438,000$ 569,920$ Rolled over to FY22 TAP 33926 Coralville, Iowa River Trail replacement, from Clear Creek to Rocky Shore Drive 613,000$ 924,560$ Construction TAP 33925 Tiffin, Clear Creek Trail Phase 6 102,000$ 228,800$ Construction HBP 39434 Iowa City, Gilbert Street bridge over Ralston Creek 1,000,000$ 1,664,000$ Rolled over to FY22 HBP 39427 Iowa City, 2nd Avenue bridge over Ralston Creek 444,000$ 577,200$ Rolled over to FY22 BP 35404 Iowa City, Prentiss Street bridge replacement 820,000$ 1,456,000$ Completed in FY21 CMAQ 36670 Tiffin Highway 6 and Park road roundabout 500,000$ 2,140,320$ Completed in FY21 PRF 38068 DOT, I-80/I-380 interchange project 110,204,000$ 137,755,000$ Construction PRF 38069 DOT, I-380/Forevergreen Road interchange project 360,000$ 400,000$ Completed in FY21 ROAD AND BRIDGE 8 | P a g e TRANSIT FTA/STA Sponsor TPMS Project Type Request Total Status Cambus 5965 General operations/maintenance/administration/planning 1,741,300$ 4,175,770$ Completed in FY21 Cambus 5966 In-ground hoist 96,000$ 120,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Cambus 5967 Associated capital bus maintenance (spare parts)160,000$ 200,000$ Completed in FY21 Cambus 5968 6 replacement bus shelters 72,000$ 90,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Cambus 5969 Forklift for maintenance 48,000$ 60,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Cambus 5970 Expansion and upgrade of maintenance facility 4,200,000$ 5,250,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Cambus 5971 Heavy-duty 30' replacement bus (#11)403,977$ 475,267$ Rolled over to FY22 Cambus 5972 Heavy-duty 30' replacement bus (#12)403,977$ 475,267$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5907 General operations/maintenance/administration/planning 833,235$ 2,131,439$ Completed in FY21 Coralville 5908 Contract service for persons with special needs 63,889$ 334,800$ Completed in FY21 Coralville 5909 Associated capital bus maintenance (spare parts)60,000$ 75,000$ Completed in FY21 Coralville 5910 Design and construct Intermodal Transportation Center/Phase II 8,400,000$ 10,500,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5911 Construct new Transit Facilty/Phase II 1,200,000$ 1,500,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5912 Replacement passenger shelters and associated improvements 11,200$ 14,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5913 Expansion passenger shelters and associated improvements 16,800$ 21,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5914 Shop equipment for for transit maintenance 60,000$ 75,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5939 Heavy-duty 40' expansion bus 431,550$ 507,706$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5940 Heavy-duty 40' expansion bus 431,550$ 507,706$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5941 Heavy-duty 40' expansion bus 431,550$ 507,706$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5935 Light-duty 176" expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5936 Light-duty 176" expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5937 Light-duty 176" expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5938 Light-duty 176" expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Coralville 5942 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (108)431,550$ 507,706$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5926 General operations/maintenance/administration/planning 2,416,813$ 8,050,895$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5927 Contract service for persons with special needs 233,124$ 1,800,000$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5928 Replacement passenger shelters and associated improvements 40,000$ 50,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5929 Associated capital bus maintenance (spare parts)270,400$ 338,000$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5930 New Transit Maintenance/Bus Storage Facility 16,000,000$ 20,000,000$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5944 Light-duty 176' expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5945 Light-duty 176' expansion bus 84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5946 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (637U) electric 833,095$ 1,107,238$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5947 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (638U) electric 833,095$ 1,107,238$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5948 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (657) electric 833,095$ 1,107,238$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5949 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (659) electric 833,095$ 1,107,238$ Completed in FY21 Iowa City 5934 Light-duty 176' replacement bus (810)84,318$ 99,197$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5950 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (656) electric 941,152$ 1,107,238$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5951 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (658) electric 941,152$ 1,107,238$ Rolled over to FY22 Iowa City 5952 Heavy-duty 40' replacement bus (660) electric 941,152$ 1,107,238$ Rolled over to FY22 9 | P a g e Each of the three fixed route transit providers in the metropolitan area use different mechanisms to produce the local funding to match FTA/STA funds for local projects. Coralville Transit uses general fund, transit levy dollars, and income from their intermodal facility to cover the local match for projects, Iowa City Transit uses transit levy funds and intermodal facility income, and University of Iowa Cambus uses student and parking fees. All transit projects listed in the TIP include local funding. 10 | P a g e Regionally Significant Projects Regionally Significant Projects are submitted in the TIP to ensure environmental review throughout the project development process. Inclusion of a project in the TIP does not guarantee federal-aid eligibility or funding. Eligibility is determined on a case-by-case basis when project authorization is requested from the FHWA and the FTA. The following projects and cost estimates represent regionally significant projects: Coralville • I-80/1st Avenue Interchange: $22.7 million • Forevergreen Road extension from 12th Avenue to Naples Avenue: $3 million • Kansas Avenue from Forevergreen Road to Highway 6: $7.5 million Iowa City • Dodge Street (Governor Street to Burlington Street): $14.2 million Tiffin • Park Road (Hwy 6 to Forevergreen Road): $5.6 million (one phase remaining) North Liberty • Ranshaw Way (Highway 965) Corridor (Forevergreen Road to Penn Street): $18 million (two phases remaining) • Forevergreen Road extension from Naples Avenue to North Liberty Road: $3 million Iowa DOT • I-80/I-380 Interchange: $348 million University Heights • Melrose Avenue improvements from Sunset Street to east city limits: $1.5 million 11 | P a g e 12 | P a g e 13 | P a g e 14 | P a g e 15 | P a g e 16 | P a g e 17 | P a g e 18 | P a g e TIP Project Locations The following map shows the general project locations for all Iowa DOT projects and projects funded with regional STBG, and TAP funds in the Iowa City Urbanized Area. (Map produced by Iowa Department of Transportation/TPMS) 19 | P a g e Revising the Approved TIP Revisions are defined as any changes to the TIP that occur outside of the annual updating process. There are two types of changes that occur under the umbrella of revision. The first is a major revision or “Amendment.” The second is a minor revision or “Administrative Modification.” The MPO uses the following definitions and thresholds when determining an amendment vs. an administrative modification. Amendments: An amendment is a revision to the TIP that involves a major change to a project included in the TIP, the creation of a new project, a major change in design concept, or a change in scope or project cost. The following criteria define the need for an amendment: • Project Cost: Projects in which the recalculated project costs increase federal aid by more than 30% or increase total federal aid by more than $2 million from the original amount. • Schedule Changes: Projects added or deleted from the TIP. • Funding Sources: Adding an additional federal funding source. • Scope Changes: Changing the project termini, project alignment, the number of through lanes, type of work from an overlay to reconstruction, or a change to include widening of the roadway. Procedural Requirements for an Amendment: Amendments are considered major revisions and therefore have additional procedural requirements. When the TIP is amended, MPOJC is required to conduct our adopted amendment process, including public review and comment, re-demonstration of fiscal constraint or a conformity determination (non-exempt projects in nonattainment and maintenance areas), review by the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TTAC), and Policy Board approval. Notices announcing TIP amendments are published in the Iowa City Press-Citizen a minimum of 15 days prior to an Urbanized Area Policy Board meeting. Iowa DOT sponsored projects located within the MPO planning boundary must also use the MPO’s public participation process. Illustrative projects that are found to be regionally significant must also be revised using the MPOJC adopted amendment process. Administrative Modifications: A minor revision to a TIP is known as an administrative modification. Administrative modifications include minor changes to project costs, minor changes to funding sources, and minor changes to project phase initiation dates. Administrative modifications are subject to re-demonstration of fiscal constraint of the TIP. 20 | P a g e The following criteria define the need for an administrative modification: • Project Costs: Projects in which the recalculated project costs do not increase federal aid by more than 30% or do not increase total federal aid by more than $2 million from the original amount. • Schedule Changes: Changes in schedules to projects included in the first four years of the TIP. • Funding Sources: Changing funding from one source to another. • Scope changes: All changes to a project’s scope will require an amendment. Procedural Requirements for an Administrative Modification: Administrative modifications have simplified procedures which allow more flexibility when processing changes. Public participation procedures are not required for administrative modifications (both local and DOT projects). 21 | P a g e MPO Public Input Process Providing opportunities for public input during planning processes ensures that future development is informed by the interests of the community. As a result, residents of MPOJC entities are routinely encouraged to participate in local planning processes. The following MPOJC Public Participation Plan, in accordance with the Code of Federal Regulations section §450.316 “Interested parties, participation, and consultation”, documents a process for providing citizens and stakeholders with reasonable opportunities to be involved in the planning process. The core public involvement opportunities for MPOJC work products include the development and adoption of the Long Range Multi-modal Transportation Plan, the Transportation Improvement Program, the Passenger Transportation Plan, the Transportation Planning Work Program, and apportionment of Surface Transportation Block Grant Program and Transportation Alternatives Program funds. Similarly, the entities of Coralville, Iowa City, North Liberty, Tiffin, University Heights, Johnson County, and the University of Iowa each follow their own public involvement processes when developing or updating local plans. The University of Iowa uses the MPO’s Public Participation Plan process to satisfy the public participation requirements for its annual Program of Projects for transit. The Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) public notice of public involvement activities and time established for public review and comment on the TIP will satisfy the Transit Program of Projects requirements of the FTA Section 5307 Program. Core Public Involvement Opportunities MPOJC gathers public comment on each key work product and forwards the comments to the Urbanized Area Policy Board and sub-committees for consideration during the decision-making process. The following three methods form the foundation for public involvement during development of key MPOJC products. Public Comment Period MPOJC staff initiates a formal public comment period lasting 30 days prior to the adoption and/or amendment of the Long-Range Transportation Plan, the Transportation Improvement Program (15 days minimum prior for TIP amendments), and the Passenger Transportation Plan. During public comment periods, residents are encouraged to submit written comments on the given topic. MPOJC staff then forwards these comments to the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board for consideration during the decision-making process. Written public input may be submitted to: Kent Ralston, Director Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County 410 E. Washington St., Iowa City, IA 52245 Kent-ralston@iowa-city.org 22 | P a g e Urbanized Area Policy Board Public Meetings In addition to written input, residents are encouraged to attend and provide comments at regularly scheduled Urbanized Area Policy Board meetings where MPOJC work products are adopted or amended. Staff typically provides a brief presentation followed by a period for formal public comment. Anyone wishing to provide input is given an opportunity. All comments become part of the public record and are provided to the Urbanized Area Policy Board in full prior to action by the Urbanized Area Policy Board. Public meetings of the Urbanized Area Policy Board are open to the public and are subject to the Iowa’s Open Meetings Law. MPO member entities may request a special meeting of the Urbanized Area Policy Board to consider time sensitive amendments to the adopted Transportation Improvement Program. This capability is intended to prevent costly delays in the project letting process. Public Workshops/Open Houses Public workshops are informal and open to all residents. The purpose of the workshop is to provide information to the public and to solicit public comment. An attendance record is kept and attendees are given the opportunity to sign up for the MPOJC mailing list. MPOJC staff typically provides a brief presentation, share information using displays and handouts, and interact with the public to answer questions. Public workshops are frequently used for key MPOJC work products. Accommodations for Special Populations All meeting rooms are accessible by ADA standards. Additionally, any MPO documents can be made available in alternative formats upon request. Individuals with disabilities may request special accommodations by contacting MPOJC staff at (319) 356-5230. Getting the Word Out About Upcoming Public Involvement Events MPOJC uses five outlets to notify residents about upcoming public comment periods and public workshops: • Residents may sign-up to receive email notices of public input opportunities by visiting www.icgov.org/e-subscriptions and completing the subscription form. • Notices of public input opportunities are published in the Iowa City Press Citizen. • The MPOJC website (www.MPOJC.org) lists upcoming meeting information. • Posters are displayed Iowa City, Coralville, and University of Iowa Cambus buses regarding TIP approval. • Notices are sent to the following MPOJC Public Input Organizations: ❖ Access 2 Independence ❖ Allen Lund Company ❖ Bicyclists of Iowa City 23 | P a g e ❖ Chamber of Commerce ❖ Citizens for Sensible Development ❖ Clear Creek Amana School District ❖ Iowa City Area Assoc. of Realtors ❖ Iowa City Area Development Group ❖ Iowa City Historic Preservation Commission ❖ Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center ❖ Iowa City Neighborhood Services Office ❖ Iowa City Sierra Club ❖ Iowa City School Board ❖ Iowa Interstate Railroad ❖ MPOJC Regional Trails and Bicycling Committee ❖ Johnson County Historic Preservation Commission ❖ Johnson Co. Historical Society ❖ Coralville Parks & Recreation Commission ❖ CRANDIC Railroad ❖ Environmental Advocates ❖ FAIR! ❖ Friends of the Iowa River Scenic Trail ❖ Friends of Historic Preservation ❖ Goodwill of the Heartland ❖ Iowa Bicycle Coalition ❖ Johnson County Planning and Zoning Commission ❖ Johnson County SEATS ❖ League of Women Voters of Johnson County ❖ North Liberty Parks & Recreation Commission ❖ North Liberty Community Center ❖ Project GREEN ❖ Soil & Water Conservation Service ❖ Systems Unlimited ❖ Tiffin Planning and Zoning Commission To request being added to the MPOJC Public Input Organization list, please contact MPOJC staff at (319) 356-5230. 24 | P a g e Summary of Public Participation Procedures 25 | P a g e 26 | P a g e AVISO DE REUNION PUBLICA The Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County mantendra una reunion publica por el FY2022-2025 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) para The Iowa City Urbanized Area. The TIP es el documento de programacion para todos los proyectos de transportacion de caminos que reciben fondos estatales o federales, incluso: calle y carretera, transito, ferrocarril, bicicleta y proyectos peatonales, en el Iowa City Urbanized Area. La audiencia pública se llevará a cabo el 7 de Julio a las 4:30p.m. Esta sesión sera electrónica. Para mas informacion sobre esta sesión electronica, la audiencia pública o el TIP contactar con MPOJC al 319-326-5235 o por correo electrónico a brad-neumann@iowa- city.org 27 | P a g e NOTICE PUBLIC HEARING The Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) will be holding a PUBLIC HEARING on the FY2022-2025 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP) for the Iowa City Urbanized Area. The TIP is the programming document for all surface transportation projects that receive State or Federal funds, including: street & highway, bicycle, transit, and pedestrian projects. The hearing will be held on July 7, 2021 at 4:30 p.m. This meeting will be a remote/electronic meeting. For information on the electronic meeting, public hearing, or the TIP contact MPOJC at (319) 356-5235 or email brad-neumann@iowa-city.org. 28 | P a g e Official Publication Iowa City Press-Citizen, June 8, 2020 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County will be holding a public hearing on the “FY2022-2025 Transportation Improvement Program” (TIP) for the Iowa City Urbanized Area. The TIP is the programming document for all surface transportation and transit projects that receive state or federal funds, including: street & highway, transit, rail, bicycle, and pedestrian projects in the Iowa City urbanized area. The public notice of public participation activities and time established for public review of and comments on the TIP will satisfy the transit Section 5307 Program of Projects requirements. The public hearing will be held on July 7th, 2021 at 4:30 pm. This meeting will be a remote/electronic meeting. For information on the electronic meeting contact MPOJC at 319-356- 5235 or email brad-neumann@iowa-city.org. Information about the proposed TIP can be found at www.MPOJC.org. Interested persons are encouraged to attend or forward written comments by 5:00 pm, July 6th, 2021 to Brad Neumann, Associate Transportation Planner, MPOJC, 410 E. Washington St., Iowa City, Iowa 52240; or by email at brad-neumann@iowa-city.org. If you require disability related accommodations for this event, please contact Brad Neumann at least 48 hours prior to the event so that we can accommodate your needs. 29 | P a g e MPO Project Selection Procedures Funding Allocation Process for Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) Program and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds 1. Application forms for the MPO Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) Program and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds are distributed to members of the MPO Transportation Technical Advisory Committee. Project sponsors must describe the project, the modes of transportation affected, and terrain and right-of-way needs and the funding request. 2. Summaries of projects and funding requests are distributed to the MPO transportation planning public input process organizations, and the MPO website. 3. MPO staff evaluates and assigns scores and rankings to the projects, according to the MPO- adopted scoring criteria. 4. MPO staff evaluates the applications to ensure the proposed projects conform with the MPO Long Range Multi-modal Transportation Plan and that the projects are federal-aid eligible. 5. Project applications and rankings are forwarded to the MPO Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TTAC) that considers the applications at a public meeting. In considering a recommendation on project funding, the TTAC consider project scores and rankings, public input, application materials and discussion from applicants. The TTAC makes a recommendation to the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board on project funding. 6. A summary of the applications, project scores and rankings, public input and the TTAC funding recommendation are forwarded to the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board for review and ultimately a vote on project funding. The Board will also hold a public hearing to provide additional opportunity for public input. 7. The last step is revising the MPO Transportation Improvement Program to add projects and funding levels consistent with the MPO Board’s decision. The Transportation Improvement Program is approved by the Board each July. 30 | P a g e FY25 -26 Surface Transportation Block Grant & Transportation Alternative Program – Scoring Criteria MPOJC Policy Board Approved November 18, 2020 1: Economic Opportunity – Supports metro area growth, innovation, job creation, and productivity A. Project improves/provides direct access to planned growth area, existing jobs, or retail +5 B. Project involves more than one MPO jurisdiction +1 each (Points Possible: 7) Total Points Possible: 12 (13%) Score: 2: Environment1 – Preserves and protects our natural resources, including land, water and air quality A. Project promotes air quality improvements via congestion reduction through one or more of the following: Geometric improvements (physical improvements that improve motorist operations), ITS/signalization improvements, Reduction of Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), Improvement to turning movements +1 each (Points Possible: 4) B. Project preserves the natural environment through Stormwater Management practices such as: Incorporating permeable pavements, bioretention, soil restoration, etc. +1 each (Points Possible: 3) Total Points Possible: 7 (8%) Score: 3: Quality of Life – Enhances livability and creates vibrant and appealing places that serve residents throughout their lives A. Project directly enhances safe route(s) to school, or improves transportation choices for locations specifically serving multi-family developments or elderly populations +5 Total Points Possible: 5 (5%) Score: 4: System Preservation – Maintained in good and reliable condition A. Maintenance or improvement to existing facility/infrastructure +5 Total Points Possible: 5 (5%) Score: 5: Efficiency – Builds a well-connected transportation network and coordinating land use patterns to reduce travel demand, miles travelled, and fossil fuel consumption A. Project in a corridor with existing congestion (defined as having LOS E or F during peak hours according to the adopted MPO Travel Demand Model) +7 B. Project in a corridor with forecasted future congestion (defined as having LOS E or F during peak hours according to adopted MPO Travel Demand Model, LOS map is attached) +7 Total Points Possible: 14 (15%) Score: 31 | P a g e 6: Choice – Offers multi-modal transportation options that are affordable and accessible A. Project is on existing bus route (bus route map is attached) +3 B. Separated trail or wide sidewalk (8’ or wider) +3 C. Project reduces modal conflict (pedestrian hybrid beacons, grade separation, dedicated bicycle lanes or sharrows, bus pull-off, etc.) +3 Total Points Possible: 9 (10%) Score: 7: Safety – Designed and maintained to enhance the safety and security of all users A. History involving two or more documented bicycle or pedestrian collisions in the last five years (collision maps are attached) +7 B. Top 25 highest MPO accident locations or top 10 highest accident mid-blocks in last three years (accident tables are attached) +7 OR C. Sight distance or related safety issue documented by an expert (planner/engineer) +7 Total Points Possible for A&B: 14 (15%) OR Total Points Possible for C: 7 Score: 8: Health – Invites and enhances healthy and active lifestyles A. Project extends regional trail network (map is attached) +3 B. Project addresses critical gap in the regional trail network +5 Total Points Possible: 8 (9%) Score: 9: Equity2 – Provides access and opportunity for all people and neighborhoods A. Project improves transportation network in lower-income neighborhoods +5 B. Focus of the project is to correct ADA non-compliance +3 Total Points Possible: 8 (9%) Score: 10: Local Commitment – Gauges local commitment to the project including local and/or state funds pledged A. Local match 20.1% - 30% +1 B. Local match 30.1% - 40% +3 C. Local match 40.1% - 50% +5 D. Local match 50.1% - 60% +7 E. Local match 60.1% - or more +9 Total Points Possible: 9 (10%) Score: Total Score: 1Not used to score Transportation Alternatives Program projects 2Lower-income neighborhoods are defined as being at or below 80% of Area Median Income (AMI) by block group. Source: American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates (2012-2016) 32 | P a g e MPO Project Selection - STBG Swap In the spring of 2021, the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board approved apportionments of the regional Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG) Program funds and the Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP) funds for programming in FY2025 and FY2026. At their March 2021 meeting the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board voted to “opt out” of the available federal-aid-swap offered by the Iowa DOT. This program would allow federal dollars to be swapped for state funding. Due to this decision, all MPO funded projects will continue to follow the federal-aid project development process. The regional STBG and TAP funds apportioned by the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board are federal funds allocated to the MPO by the Iowa Department of Transportation. The MPO programs a minimum of four years of regional STBG and TAP funds following a grant application and public input process. 33 | P a g e Fiscal constraint of the TIP Operations and Maintenance To ensure the entities that comprise the MPO are capable of maintaining and operating their transportation system, the following spreadsheets show that annual operations and maintenance costs are less than forecasted revenues from non-federal-aid sources. Year of Expenditure In 2008, MPOJC began tracking projects using cost estimates in Year of Expenditure to reflect inflated expenses when projects are postponed. In this way, the MPO TIP is fiscally constrained because cost estimates increase over time. The rate of inflation used is 4%. STBG and TAP Funds Allocated The following spreadsheets summarize the allocations of regional Surface Transportation Block Grant Program and Transportation Alternatives Program funds allocated to MPO communities by the MPO Urbanized Area Policy Board. The MPO Board uses Iowa DOT funding targets to apportion regional STBG and TAP funds. As funding targets are adjusted and the ‘final allocation’ of regional ST BG and TAP funds for current funding years are issued by Iowa DOT, the running total of funds granted to the MPO are adjusted. For example, if the final allocation of STBG funds issued by Iowa DOT was larger than the total amount of funding allocation, a surplus of funds is carried forward. While there are fluctuations in the year-to-year comparison of programmed funds vs. funding targets, for the four-year term of the MPO TIP the regional STBG and TAP funds allocated by the MPO Board are always equal to or less than the funding targets issued by Iowa DOT. In this way, the MPO TIP is fiscally constrained for project funding under the control of the MPO Board. For Iowa DOT and earmark projects, the MPO TIP includes only those projects programmed by Iowa DOT that have been allocated federal funds. In this way, the MPO TIP is fiscally constrained for other federal aid projects that occur within the MPO transportation planning boundary. Forecasts of Available Revenue Each year prior to development of the Iowa DOT’s Five‐Year Program and the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program both state and federal revenue forecasts are completed to determine the amount of funding available for programming. These forecasts are a critical component in the development of the Five‐Year Program and as such are reviewed with the Iowa Transportation Commission. The primary sources of state funding to the DOT are the Primary Road Fund and TIME-21 Fund. These state funds are used for the operation, maintenance and construction of the Primary Road System. The amount of funding available for operations and 34 | P a g e maintenance are determined by legislative appropriations. Additional funding is set aside for statewide activities including engineering costs. The remaining funding is available for right of way and construction activities associated with the highway program. Along with the state funds, the highway program utilizes a portion of the federal funds that are allocated to the state. A federal funding forecast is prepared each year based on the latest apportionment information available. This forecast includes the various federal programs and identifies which funds are allocated to the Iowa DOT for programming and which funds are directed to locals through the MPO/RPA planning process, Highway Bridge Program and various grant programs. Implementation of a federal aid swap will increase the amount of federal funds that are utilized by the Iowa DOT. For more information regarding Iowa DOT projects programmed in the MPOJC FY2022-2025 TIP, please refer to the Iowa DOT’s Office of Program Management’s Five-Year Program webpage: https://iowadot.gov/program_management/five‐year‐program 35 | P a g e 36 | P a g e 37 | P a g e 38 | P a g e 39 | P a g e Federal Funding By Program and Year 40 | P a g e FTA Financial Analysis FTA Circular 7008.1, Federal Transit Administration Financial Capacity Policy, requires that all recipients of FTA funding prepare an annual assessment of their financial condition and financial capability. FTA has developed a set of guidelines that are used to assess the financial condition and capability of the three fixed route transit systems in the Iowa City Urbanized Area. The main factors covered in the assessment are trends in ridership, fare levels and revenues, non-fare revenues, and unit costs. The analysis is a two-step process with the first step examining the current financial condition of the transit system using historical data. The second step looks at the likelihood that trends will continue to meet future operating and capital needs. Indicators of current financial condition 1. Farebox revenue trends Coralville Transit: • The average passenger fare increased by 4.5% between FY2019 and FY2020 to $0.93. The average fare is expected to increase during the period of FY2022-2025 as Coralville Transit recovers from the effects of COVID-19. • Ridership decreased by 23% between FY2019 and FY2020. Ridership had been declining steadily since peaking in FY2013 due to low fuel prices, area road construction detours, and alternative transportation options. However, due to COVID-19, transit service was drastically reduced in FY2020 which also contributes to the drastic decrease in ridership. Quarterly numbers in FY2021 indicate that ridership is continuing to struggle to get back to normal. COVID-19 is anticipated to impact Coralville Transit service for years to come. Iowa City Transit: • The average passenger fare increased by 3.8% between FY2019 to FY2020 to $0.82. The average fare is expected to increase during the period FY2022-2025 as Iowa City Transit recovers from the effects of COVID-19. • Ridership decreased by 22% between FY2019 and FY2020. As with Coralville Transit; low fuel prices, area road construction detours, and alternative transportation options contributed to a steady decrease in ridership since FY2013. However, Iowa City Transit’s ridership is also expected to struggle to get back to normal as it deals with the effects of COVID-19 on transit service. University of Iowa Cambus: • University of Iowa Cambus operates a no-fare system so revenue from the farebox is not a factor. 41 | P a g e • Ridership decreased by just under 20% between FY2019 and FY2020. As with Coralville and Iowa City Transit; low fuel prices, area road construction detours, and alternative transportation options contributed to a steady decrease in ridership since FY2013. However, Cambus ridership is also expected to struggle to get back to normal as it deals with the effects of COVID-19 on transit service. Much of the ridership recovery depends on what the University does with on-line class and work options. 2. Non-farebox revenue trends Coralville Transit: • Coralville Transit saw an increase of about 3% in FTA operating funding in FY2021. The apportionment of 5307 FTA funding is based on an approved MPOJC formula. Due to the effect of COVID-19 on transit service, MPOJC used the same apportionment formula used in FY2020 and may continue to use the same apportion formula and data until service recovers. • State Transit Assistance increased by about 7% from FY2021-FY2022. Due to the COVID-19 effect on State revenues, funding levels are expected to decrease for the period FY2022-2025. Local tax/transit levy revenue will continue to provide about 28% of Coralville Transit’s operating funding during the period FY2022- 2025. Iowa City Transit: • Iowa City Transit saw the same 3% increase in FTA operating funding in FY2021. The apportionment of 5307 FTA funding is based on an approved MPOJC formula. Due to the effect of COVID-19 on transit service, MPOJC used the same apportionment formula use in FY2020 and may continue to use the same apportionment formula and data until service recovers. • State Transit Assistance increased by about 7% from FY2021 to FY2022. Due to the COVID-19 effect on State revenues, funding levels are expected to decrease for the period FY2022-2025. The local transit levy revenue will continue to provide about 48% of Iowa City Transit’s operating funding during the period FY2022-2025. University of Iowa Cambus: • University of Iowa Cambus experienced the same 3% increase as Iowa City and Coralville in FY2021. The apportionment of 5307 FTA funding is based on an approved MPOJC formula. Due to the effect of COVID-19 on transit service, MPOJC used the same apportionment formula used in FY2020 and may continue to use the same apportionment formula and until service recovers. • State Transit Assistance increased by about 7% from FY2021-FY2022. Due to the COVID-19 effect on State revenues, funding levels are expected to decrease for the period FY2022-2025. About 64% of Cambus funding comes from student fees 42 | P a g e that are paid each semester by University of Iowa students and from transfers from the university parking fund and other university departments. 3. Cost trends Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit and University of Iowa Cambus all experienced increases of about 3.5% in their operating costs from FY2019 to FY2020. The increases are attributed to rising wages and benefits during pre-COVID-19 operations. With the extreme reduction in transit service and the subsequent recovery due to COVID-19, operating costs will be difficult to predict for all three systems during the FY2022-2025 period. 4. Cost effectiveness trends Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, University of Iowa Cambus: Between FY2019 and FY2020 as measured by cost per mile, Coralville Transit increased by 5% from $7.51 to $7.86; Iowa City Transit cost per mile increased by 14% from $7.92 to $9.06; and University of Iowa Cambus’ increase by 17% from $5.05 to $5.91. The cost per hour for Coralville Transit increased from $90.80 to $95.20; Iowa City Transit’s cost per hour increased from $103.15 to $111.19; and University of Iowa Cambus cost per hour increased from $49.18 to $57.06. The cost per ride on Coralville Transit increased from $3.31 in FY2019 to $4.25 in FY2020. Iowa City Transit increased from $3.74 to $4.97, and University of Iowa Cambus increased from $1.02 to $1.32. All of the above trends normally vary from year to year depending on fluctuations in ridership and operating costs. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has changed how transit operates and creates uncertainty for the FY2022-2025 TIP period. Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and UI Cambus remain three of the most efficient transit systems in the state of Iowa along with Ames CyRide. 5. Likelihood of trends continuing Based on the examination of each system’s revenue forecast and projected operating expenses, Coralville Transit, Iowa City Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus will have the financial capacity to maintain adequate levels of funding for the period covered by the FY2022-2025 MPOJC Transportation Improvement Program. In addition to local, state, and federal funding support, Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and Cambus will also receive federal support through three additional sources of enhancement funding. CARES Act funding The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law on March 27, 2020. As part of the CARES Act, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) allocated $25 billion to recipients of urbanized area (Section 5307 funding) and rural area formula funds, with $22.7 billion for large and small urban areas. The State of Iowa received $35,898,003 in CARES Act funding which included $8,331,763 for the Iowa City 43 | P a g e Urbanized Area to be apportioned to Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus for operating expenses incurred beginning on January 20, 2020. The CARES Act apportionment was approved by the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board on May 27, 2020. Iowa City Transit: $5,109,870 Coralville Transit: $1,318,918 University of Iowa Cambus: $1,902,975 Eligible expenses will be used to maintain current transit services as well as pay for administrative leave for transit personnel due to reduced operations. Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act (CRRSAA) funding The Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2021 (CRRSAA) was signed into law on December 27, 2020 and included $1,532,506 for the Iowa City Urbanized Area to be apportioned to Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus. CRRSAA was part of the Federal Transit Administration’s (FTA) $14 billion funding allocation to support the Nation's public transportation systems during the COVID-19 public health emergency. The CRRSAA apportionment was approved by the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board on January 27, 2021. Iowa City Transit: $939,886 Coralville Transit: $242,596 University of Iowa Cambus: $350,024 Eligible expenses will be used to maintain current transit services by prioritizing payroll and operational needs. American Rescue Plan Act funding The American Rescue Plan Act was signed into law on March 11, 2021 as part of a $30.5 billion Federal funding allocation to continue support of public transit during COVID-19. The funding included an additional $7,496,845 for the Iowa City Urbanized Area to be apportioned to Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus. The American Rescue Plan Act apportionment was approved by the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board on May 26, 2021. Iowa City Transit: $4,597,815 Coralville Transit: $1,186,751 University of Iowa Cambus: $1,712,279 Eligible expenses will be used to maintain current transit services as well as pay for administrative leave for transit personnel due to reduced operations. 44 | P a g e Performance Based Planning Highway Safety Improvement Program (PM I) Rather than setting its own safety targets, MPOJC has chosen to support the Iowa DOT’s safety targets as published in the most recent Iowa Highway Safety Improvement Program Annual Report. The MPO supports those targets by reviewing and programming all Highway Safety Improvement Program (HSIP) projects within the MPO boundary that are included in the DOT’s Transportation Improvement Program. Any Iowa DOT sponsored HSIP projects within the MPO area were selected based on the strategies included in the Strategic Highway Safety Plan and safety performance measures and were approved by the Iowa Transportation Commission. The Iowa DOT conferred with numerous stakeholder groups, including MPOJC, as part of its target setting process. Working in partnership with local agencies, Iowa DOT safety investments were identified and programmed which will construct effective countermeasures to reduce traffic fatalities and serious injuries. The Iowa DOT projects chosen for HSIP investment are based on crash history, roadway characteristics, and the existence of infrastructure countermeasure that can address the types of crashes present. The Iowa DOT continues to utilize a systemic safety improvement process rather than relying on “hot spot” safety improvements. Pavement and Bridge (PM II) Rather than setting its own pavement and bridge targets, MPOJC has chosen to support the Iowa DOT’s pavement and bridge targets as submitted in the most recent baseline period performance report. The MPO supports those targets by reviewing and programming all Interstate and National Highway System projects within the MPO boundary that are included in the DOT’s Transportation Improvement Program. Any Iowa DOT sponsored pavement and bridge projects within the MPO area were determined in alignment with the Iowa Transportation Asset Management Plan (TAMP) and the pavement and bridge performance measures. The TAMP connects Iowa in Motion 2045 and system/modal plans to Iowa DOT’s Five‐Year Program and the STIP. Iowa in Motion 2045 defines a vision for the transportation system over the next 20 years, while the Five‐Year Program and STIP identify specific investments over the next four to five years. The TAMP has a 10‐year planning horizon and helps ensure that investments in the Five‐Year Program and STIP are consistent with Iowa DOT’s longer‐term vision. Starting in 2019, the TAMP also integrated the pavement and bridge performance targets. The Iowa DOT conferred with numerous stakeholder groups, including MPOJC and local owners of NHS assets, as part of its target setting process. The methodology used to set targets used current and historical data on condition and funding to forecast future condition. Asset management focuses on performing the right treatment at the right time to optimize investments and outcomes. Management systems are utilized to predict bridge and pavement needs and help 45 | P a g e determine the amount of funding needed for stewardship of the system. The TAMP discusses the major investment categories that the Iowa DOT Commission allocates funding through. Once the Iowa DOT Commission approves the funding for these categories, Iowa DOT recommends the allocation of the funds to specific projects using the processes described in the TAMP. Pavement and bridge projects are programmed to help meet the desired program outcomes documented in the TAMP. System and Freight Reliability (PM III) Rather than setting its own system and freight reliability targets, MPOJC has chosen to support the Iowa DOT’s system and freight reliability targets as submitted in the most recent baseline period performance report. The MPO supports those targets by reviewing and programming all Interstate and National Highway System projects within the MPO boundary that are included in the DOT’s Transportation Improvement Program. The Iowa DOT conferred with numerous stakeholder groups, including MPOJC, as part of its target setting process. Variability within the existing travel time dataset was used to forecast future condition. Projects focused on improving pavement and bridge condition also often help improve system reliability and freight movement. Additional projects focused specifically on improving these areas of system performance are developed in alignment with the target‐setting process for related performance measures, and the freight improvement strategies and freight investment plan included in the State Freight Plan. This plan includes a detailed analysis and prioritization of freight bottlenecks, which are locations that should be considered for further study and possibly for future improvements. The process also involved extensive input from State, MPO, RPA, and industry representatives. State projects identified in the freight investment plan and programmed in the STIP were highly‐ranked freight bottlenecks. Transit Asset Management Performance Based Planning Public transit capital projects included in the STIP align with the transit asset management (TAM) planning and target setting processes undertaken by the Iowa DOT, transit agencies, and MPOs. The Iowa DOT establishes a group TAM plan and group targets for all small urban and rural providers while large urban providers establish their own TAM plans and targets. Investments are made in alignment with TAM plans with the intent of keeping the state’s public transit vehicles and facilities in a state of good repair and meeting transit asset management targets. The Iowa DOT allocates funding for transit rollingstock in accordance with the Public Transit Management System process. In addition, the Iowa DOT awards public transit infrastructure grants in accordance with the project priorities established in Iowa Code chapter 924. Additional state and federal funding sources that can be used by transit agencies for vehicle and facility improvements are outlined in the funding chapter of the Transit Manager’s Handbook. Individual transit agencies determine the use of these sources for capital and operating expenses based on their local needs. As part of the development of the TAM Plan, Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus established performance measure targets for rolling stock, equipment, and facilities. The targets used “useful life” and “condition” benchmarks to measure performance annually. The performance targets included: 46 | P a g e • Equipment (non-revenue service vehicles over $50,000 in acquisition value) State of Good Repair Target - Percentage of Vehicles (maintenance trucks/maintenance equipment) that have met or exceeded their Useful Life Benchmark. • Facilities State of Good Repair Target with an asset class rated below 3.0 (5 being excellent) on the TERM (Transit Economic Requirements Model) Scale. • Rolling Stock State of Good Repair Target - Percentage of Revenue Vehicles within a particular asset class that have met or exceeded their Useful Life Benchmark. • Infrastructure Is not applicable. MPOJC adopted the local transit agency performance targets at the September 2017 Urbanized Area Policy Board meeting. MPOJC will be required to reflect the adopted performance measures and targets in all Long-Range Transportation Plans and Transportation Improvement Programs and report on progress toward those targets. The Urbanized Area Policy Board assures that the MPO will work cooperatively with the State of Iowa and the respective targets for regional transit asset management and will work cooperatively with Iowa City Transit, Coralville Transit, and University of Iowa Cambus to support the local fixed route systems’ respective targets through the comprehensive, continuing and cooperative metropolitan transportation planning process, including activities related to collection of data, tracking, and reporting toward attainment of critical outcomes in the Iowa City Metropolitan Planning Area. Transit Safety Performance Based Planning Public transit capital projects included in the STIP align with the transit safety planning and target setting processes undertaken by the transit agencies and MPOs. While the Iowa DOT provided assistance with the development of initial Public Transportation Agency Safety Plans (PTASPs), each large urban transit provider is responsible for implementing its PTASP, which includes transit safety targets. Investments are made in alignment with PTASPs with the intent of keeping the state’s public transit operations, vehicles, and facilities safe and meeting transit safety targets. State and federal funding sources that can be used by transit agencies for operations, vehicles, and facility improvements are outlined in the funding chapter of the Transit Manager’s Handbook. Individual transit agencies determine the use of these sources for capital and operating expenses based on their local needs.