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Draft Road and Bridge - Jan2260 61TRANSPoRTATioN FuNDiNG RoAD AND BRiDGe Road and Bridge Network 62 63RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 27 miles interstate highway 29 miles principal arterials (state highways) 87 miles major arterials 69 miles collector streets 375 miles local roads 587 total centerline miles in the Metro Area Road and Bridge Network Vision To create a comprehensive, integrated, and connected road network, accomodat- ing mulitple modes of travel, to support sustainable growth and development and enhance quality of life. Transportation Network The 587-mile metropolitan area roadway network is the backbone of the transportation sys- tem in the urbanized area. The arterial street network provides multi-modal access to neighbor- hoods, commercial and industrial areas, schools, and parks. Arterial streets are the main routes for commercial deliveries, emergency service vehicles, school buses, and public transit vehicles. Local roads provide direct access to households, carry the lowest volume of traffic, have the low- est speeds, and tend to be most popular with pedestrians and bicyclists. Arterial Streets The MPOJC Arterial Streets Map (see opposite page) reflects the metropolitan area arterial streets including the U.S. Highway, State Highway, and Interstate System, and shows where future arteri- al street extensions are expected (the exact location will be determined through the design and engineering process). Future arterial corridors are identified by metro area entities. The Arterial Streets Map is approved by the MPOJC Urbanized Area Policy Board coincident with the adoption of the LRTP. 85% of respondents to the LRTP online survey rated the overall transportation network as fair, good, or very good. (551 responses) Arterial Streets Map 64 65RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe There are two types of bridge deficiencies. A bridge deficiency does not imply a bridge is unsafe. Structurally-deficient - A bridge having deterioration to one or more major components, but the bridge is not unsafe. Functionally Obsolete– The geometric design of a bridge does not meet the current design standards. Functional Classification Functional classification is a tool used to define the role of roadways within the larger transpo- ration network. Each classification fits within a hierarchy based on the level of mobility and ac- cess that the particular roadway is intended to provide. Roadways with higher classifications better serve mobility and provide less access to in- dividual properties, whereas roadways with lower classifications provide greater access to individual properties but less overall mobili- ty. Vehicles are able to move with the highest speeds and least delay on higher-order road- ways, such as interstates, while bicyclists and pedestrians tend to move with the greatest ease on lower-order streets, such as local, and collector streets. Classification of Metro Area Roadways The MPO works with local jurisdictions, the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT), and the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to determine the federal functional classification of metro area roadways. Approximately 33% of the metro area roadways are classified on the Federal Functional Classification map (see left). This designation is significant as federal fund- ing can only be spent on roadways functionally classified as collector or higher. The metro area can have no more than 35% of total roadways classified. Status of the Metro Area’s Bridges The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has developed condition ratings to describe overall condition of bridges. Across the nation, bridge condition is determined by the lowest rating of National Bridge Inventory (NBI) con- dition ratings for the bridge deck, superstruc- ture, substructure or culvert. Bridge condition is classified in terms of good, fair and poor as noted in the table below. Of the nation’s 618,456 bridges, 45% are in good condition whereas 7.2% are in poor condition. Iowa ranks #2 in the nation for the percentage of structurally deficient bridges: 19.1%. Iowa ranks #1 in the nation for the total number of structurally deficient bridges with 4,571. The map on this page shows the location and condition of the 121 bridges within the metro- politan planning boundary. Of the 121 bridges; 53 are in good condition, 59 are in fair condi- tion and 9 are in poor condition (strcuturally deficient). Two of the most traveled structurally deficient bridges in Iowa are located in Iowa City: Gilbert Street over Ralston Creek - 14,500 daily crossings [slated to be replaced in FY2022 with $1,000,000 in Surface Transportation Block Grant – High- way Bridge Program federal funding.] Highway 1 northbound over the Iowa River (Burlington St. Bridge, eastbound) - 10,650 daily crossings.Good (G), Fair (F), Poor(P): These terms are defined in ac- cordance with the Pavement and Bridge Condition Performance Measures final rule, published in January of 2017. 67% 9% 13% 6% 5% Local Collector Minor Arterials Principal Arterials Interstate Roadway Classification 68.9 centerline miles 87.3 centerline miles 29.15 centerline miles 27 centerline miles 375 centerline miles Metro Area roadways eligible for Federal Funding Functional classification from highest to lowest: Condition Rating Definition GOOD ≥ 7 Some minor problems or maintenance needs in the near future. POOR ≤ 4 Advanced section loss, deterioration, spalling, or scour All primary structural elements are sound but may have minor section loss, cracking, spalling or scour.5 or 6FAIR 66 67RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Pavement Condition The condition of our region’s infrastructure is monitored using a numerical rating called Pavement Condition Index (PCI). PCI is a metric developed by the Iowa DOT that accounts for a pavement’s ride quality and the amount of cracking, faulting, and rutting present. PCI rates the condition of the surface of a road network from 0-100, where 0 is poor and 100 is good. Source: Iowa DOT Transportation Asset Management (TAM) Plan (2019-2028) PCI for State and Federal Highways: Pavement condition data for state and federal highways in Iowa is collected by the Iowa DOT and is shown on the map to the left. The pave- ment condition of all state and federal high- ways in the metro area averages (77), which means roads are generally in good condition. This is up from the 2014 average of 70. very poor good State and Federal Highways This analysis used 2020 PCI data to identify the condition of the region’s pavement. Within the Metro Area, 97% of State and Federal High- ways are in fair to excellent condition; 3% are are in poor or very poor condition. PCI for Local Federal Aid Routes: Pavement condition for local roads, eligible for federal aid, is collected through the Institute for Transportation at Iowa State University (In- Trans) and is shown in the map to the right. The pavement condition of all Federal Aid eligi- ble roadways is in fair condition averaging 34. Within the metro area, 60% of local Federal Aid routes are classified as being in fair or good condition; which can be attributed to the re- gion’s continued investment in the repair and maintenance of our roadways. The region’s pavement condition will be tracked over time in order to measure performance and help pri- oritize improvements. Information on pavement condition by community and for local streets can be found in the Supporting Documents section of this plan. NOTE: The PCI numbers obtained from the Iowa DOT and inTrans are not comparable values as they are derived from different equations. Within the Metro area, 70% of Local Federal Aid Routes are in fair to excellent condition; 30% are are in poor or very poor condition. Local Federal Aid Routes This analysis used 2019 PCI data to identify the condition of the region’s pavement. Average PCi 34 Local Federal Aid Routes are those roadways eligible for Federal transportation funding. Minor Collectors within the Urbanized Area and all Major Collectors, Arterials, Freeways/Expressways, and Interstates are eligible for Federal transportation funds. very poor good Overall, Iowa’s roadway system includes more that 240,000 lane miles of roadway. Source: Iowa DOT Transit Asset Management Plan. 68 69RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Travel Demand Model Travel demand models (TDM) simulate existing travel patterns and forecast future travel patterns based on existing, committed, and planned system improvements and socio-economic data. TDMs support the development of the long range transportation plan and provide an objective tool for evaluating major infrastructure projects, traffic volumes, and delay. TDM’s are nationally recognized tools used by nearly all MPO’s and DOT’s across the United States. The Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC), along with assistance of the Iowa DOT, developed a TDM for the 2050 Long Range Transportation Plan. The MPOJC TDM was built using the Iowa DOT’s Iowa Standardized Model Structure (ISMS).1 ISMS provides a standard- ized yet scalable travel demand modeling architecture for use by all MPOs in Iowa. The MPOJC TDM utilizes TransCAD as the software that performs the four-step modeling process of trip generation, trip distribution, mode choice, and traffic assignment. 1. Trip Generation Trip generation is the process of estimating the number of trip productions and attractions in each transportation analysis zone (TAZ) based on the socio-economic activity within the zone. The model relies on data about economic activity (housing units, building area, and land use area) to predict transportation decisions and trip generation. This process is conducted inde- pendently by type of trip purpose (school, work, etc.) and done for each discrete time period. Input Data Model development began with the preparation of socioeconomic and network data for the en- tire metropolitan area. A few of the primary elements of the TDM include: • Parcel data (housing units, building area, and land use area) • U.S. Census data (housing and demographic data) • Network data (lanes, posted speeds, status of roadway improvements) Trip Purposes Travel characteristics vary depending upon the reason the trip is being made. Some types of trips can only fulfill the intended purpose of that trip at very specific locations, such as schools. Other types of trips are less sensitive to the distance between the origin point and the choices of desti- nation, such as work trips. As such, trips were simplified into 3 basic categories: 1. Home-based work – a trip between one’s home and workplace 2. Home-based non-work – a trip between one’s home and a location other than work, such as shopping. 3. Non-home based – a trip that does not begin or end at home, such as a trip from work to shopping Time Period Daily person trip activities and various network elements are subdivided into four time periods, AM (6:00-8:59), Mid-day (9:00 AM – 2:59 PM), PM (3:00-5:59) and off-peak (6:00 PM – 5:59 AM). Weekday and weekend travel are modeled individually. Transportation Analysis Zones A transportation analysis zone (TAZ) represents the geography within which economic activity oc- curs that results in the movement of people and freight. Each TAZ includes base year population and land use data. Local planners were asked to assign their jurisdictions’ anticipated population and employment growth (reference land use maps/ pop growth pg) to the TAZs for years 2018 and 2050. TAZ boundaries are typically roads included in the network or natural features, such as the Iowa River. There are 850 TAZs ranging in size from individual blocks in the more densely populated areas to several square miles near the periphery of the planning boundary. There are also 35 external zones located where roads cross the planning boundary. The external zones are intended to represent the traffic passing through the metropolitan area. Person Trip Generation – Productions and Attractions Each trip has two trip ends. The trip generation mode calculates trip ends separately: one end is classified as a trip production and the other end is a trip attraction. When trips start or end at home, the home end is defined as the production end and the other end is defined as the attraction end. Transportation Network The model network includes all Federal Functional Classification (FFC) roads in the metropolitan area as well as some additional local roads that are critical for connectivity. Roads are categorized based on their capacity, speed of travel, number of travel lanes, existence of turn lanes and sur- rounding land uses. Transit routes and stops were also included in the transportation network. The model network is then used to simulate trips between the production and attraction pairs of traffic analysis zones. Transportation improvements (road and bridge infrastructure projects) not included in the 2018 base model were also stored in the transportation network file. MPO staff coordinated with local entities to develop the list of projects to be included in the long-range transportation plan. The improvements include anything from new roadways, additional or reduced capacity change, etc. [Pages 95-103.] 1. https://mtmug.iowadot.gov/isms_files/2020_ISMS_v1.1_20201028.pdf 70 71RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Person Trip Generation – Productions and Attractions Each trip has two trip ends. The trip generation mode calculates trip ends separately: one end is classified as a trip production and the other end is a trip attraction. When trips start or end at home, the home end is defined as the production end and the other end is defined as the attraction end. 2. Trip Distribution Trips are distributed across the region by way of a standard gravity model process. The gravity model assumes that the amount of travel between TAZs is based on the relative attractiveness between the origin and the destination. 3. Mode Choice Includes specific transit route details, including each transit route, route stops, route headways and access modes to and from transit. 4. Traffic Assignment Traffic or route assignment is the process of estimating the traffic flows on a network. The pro- cess evaluates the impedance along the possible combination of links to connect each trip’s origin and destination, then assigns the trips to those links. Model Validation, Calibration, and Reasonableness Checking Each step in the ISMS recommended model architecture includes guidance on model calibration, validation and reasonableness checks. Model validation is the comparison of a model to ob- served data not directly used in the model development. Model calibration is the adjustment of model constants to better replicate observed results. Model reasonableness is comparing model outputs to expected results. Limitations of the Travel Demand Model Travel Demand Models (TDMs) are best used for general indications of traffic patterns. Traffic forecasts are generated with the best information available, but no model software can predict future political, cultural, and economic decisions including: • Local decisions related to annex- ation and zoning patterns; • Private sector decisions on where to locate high traffic generation land uses; • Cost of fuel; and • Individual decisions of preferred transportation mode. Level of Service Capacity needs for the Iowa City Urbanized Area were evaluated based on current conditions (base year 2018) and anticipated future conditions (horizon year 2050). Level of Service (LOS) was used to evaluate the delay vehicle drivers experience. The Iowa DOT and MPOJC have adopt- ed LOS E as the design capacity for the purposes of vehicular traffic modeling and planning. LOS E represents the “ultimate theoretical capacity” of roadways. As traffic approaches LOS E, drivers experience congestion and delays, and some begin to divert to adjacent, less congested routes. LOS uses qualitative measures that characterize operational conditions within a traffic stream and perception of these conditions by motorists and passengers. The descriptions of individual levels of service (A-F) characterize these conditions in terms of factors such as speed and travel time, freedom to maneauver, traffic interruptions, and comfort and convenience. Level of Service Technical Description Peak Hour Delay A Free flow, unencumbered movement. No restriction on speed or maneuverability.NONE B Reasonable flow. Slight restriction on maneuverability.SLIGHT C Stable flow. Some restriction on speed. Drivers must be careful when changing lanes.MINIMAL D Approaching unstable flow. Density of traffic is increased. Speed declines. Maneuverability is limited.MINIMAL E Operating at capacity; unstable flow. Vehicles are closely spaced with little room to maneuver.MODERATE F Very congested. Speeds vary; unpredictable.POTENTIAL GRIDLOCK Bicycle and Pedestrian Level of Service Level of Service (LOS) criteria for vehicles are different from those for bicycles and pedestri- ans. The LOS criteria for bicycles and pedestri- ans considers conditions including pavement width, number of travel lanes, traffic speeds, average daily traffic (ADT), delay, presense of heavy vehicles, corner circulation area, and the presense of pavement markings. MPOJC evaluates bicycle and pedestrian LOS at the request of our member entities. This allows for comparison of the experience of drivers, pedestrians, and bicycles simultaneously. 72 73RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Traffic congestion LOS is used to indicate areas where traffic congestion may be problematic during peak travel periods. Data Source: 2018 MPoJC Travel Demand Model 2018 Vehicular Level of Service existing Roadways In 2018, the majority of roads in the metro area experience very little congestion and high levels of service during the AM and PM peak hours. Over 97% of road miles perform at LOS A, B or C during the AM peak hour and approximately 95% during the PM peak hour. That said, a por- tion of Melrose Avenue in University Heights, Park Road in Iowa City, and the northbound Interstate 80/380 ramp currently experience congestion during the AM peak hour. During the PM peak hour, a couple of the In- terstate 80/380 and Highway 218 interchange ramps are congested. For more information on proposed capital in- frastructure projects, refer to pages 94-102. exisiting Roadways - Roadways that are built and operational as of 2018. The number of person trips, vehicle miles travelled (VMT), and freeflow vehicles hours traveled (VHT) for an average weeday under exisitng conditions are shown. Population 117,782 Person Trips 874,159 VMT 3,088,576 Freeflow VHT 75,228 2018 Metro Area Data 74 75RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 2018 Vehicular Level of Service Existing & Committed This map shows the relative impact of the few committed projects on metro congestion is minimal (when compared to the “existing” con- ditions map) as a majority of these projects were not intended to provide significant sys- tem expansion or capacity projects. For more information on proposed capital in- frastructure projects, refer to pages 94-102. existing Roads – Roadways that are built and operational as of 2018. Committed Roads – Roadway projects that have programmed funding but are not yet built. Population 117,782 Person Trips 874,159 VMT 3,085,953 Freeflow VHT 75,152 2018 Metro Area Data 76 77RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 2050 Vehicular Level of Service existing Roadways: “No Build Scenario” These maps show a scenario in which no ad- ditional projects are funded in the metro area transportation network by the year 2050. Un- der these conditions, many roads across the metro would be congesting or congested (6% AM peak hour/ 9% PM peak hour). During the AM peak hour, the corridors with the greatest congestion include Hwy 218, In- terstate 80 near the eastern and western plan- ning boundaries, Interstate 380, and portions of Forevergreen Road. Congestion occurs along the same corridors during the PM peak hour as in the AM peak hour but the degree of congestion is greater along Hwy 218, Interstate 80 near the eastern and western planning boundaries and Inter- state 380. For more information on proposed capital in- frastructure projects, refer to pages 94-102. Population 188,070 Person Trips 1,328,514 VMT 5,072,243 Freeflow VHT 123,414 2050 Metro Area Data 78 79RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 2050 Vehicular Level of Service Existing & Committed Roadways These maps illustrate a scenerio in which only those additional road projects already pro- grammed are constructed in the metro area transportation network by the year 2050. The map shows congestion would be similar to that of the 2050 “no-build” scenario. The per- centage of congested roads decreases slightly during both peak hours. Approximately 5% of major roads would experience significant con- gestion at LOS E or F during the AM peak hour and 9% during the PM peak hour. This indicates that the current “committed” projects are not intended to be significant sys- tem expansion or capacity projects. For more information on proposed capital in- frastructure projects, refer to pages 94-102. existing Roads – Roadways that are built and operation as of 2018. Committed Roads – Roadway projects that have pro- grammed funding but are not yet constructed Population 188,070 Person Trips 1,289,614 VMT 5,060,246 Freeflow VHT 116,151 2050 Metro Area Data 80 81RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe If federal funding continues to be distributed to the metro area for investment in the transpor- tation network as expected, and planned road/ capacity improvement projects are able to be completed, peak hour congestion in the metro area would decrease. The degree to which congestion is lessened is marginal considering the metro area will con- tinue to add people, jobs, and homes. This growth contributes to increased vehicle miles travelled on the major metro area roads. As less than half of the committed and planned projects (proposed to be completed by 2050) are capacity or expansion related projects, many of the major roads across the metro will remain at their existing capacity levels but will serve an increased number of vehicles. For more information on proposed capital in- frastructure projects, refer to pages 94-102. existing Roads – Roadways that are built and operational as of 2018. Committed Roads – Roadway projects that have programmed funding but are not yet built. Planned Roads – Roadway projects that are not funded or con- structed, but are anticipated in the future (2022-2050). 2050 Vehicular Level of Service Existing, Committed, & Planned Population 188,070 Person Trips 1,289,614 VMT 5,058,204 Freeflow VHT 116,083 2050 Metro Area Data 82 83RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 2050 Vehicular Level of Service existing, Committed, Planned, & Illustrative Roadways If all planned projects, including the two illustrative projects, are completed by the year 2050 the metro area is still expected to experience congestion along the Highway 218 and Interstate 380 corridor. Mar- ginal congestion is experienced throughout the met- ro but is similar to the congestion shown in the 2050 committed and planned project scenario. existing Roads – Roadways that are built and operational as of 2018. Committed Roads – Roadway projects that have programmed fund- ing but are not yet constructed. Planned Roads – Roadway projects that are not funded or built, but are anticipated in the future (2022-2050). illustrative Roads - Roadway projects that do not currently have a funding source identified. These are projects which did not score high enough to be included in the fiscally constrained list of projects. Although there are no funding sources currently identified for illustrative projects, metro area entities expect these will be completed by year 2050. The two illustrative projects are: • Benton St - Orchard St to Oaknoll Dr (2041-2050) $15,029,760 • South Arterial and Bridge - US 218 to Gilbert St (2041-2050) $58,934,477 For more information on proposed capital infra- structure projects, refer to pages 94-102. Population 188,070 Person Trips 1,289,614 VMT 5,057,897 Freeflow VHT 116,073 2050 Metro Area Data 84 85RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Road and Bridge Infrastructure Successes 2018-2021 Between FY2018 and FY2021 over $19,725,000 in Federal Surface Transportation Program funds were distributed through the MPO and invested in the metropolitan area road network. Complete Streets MPO communities have embraced the benefits of the adopted Complete Streets Policy. Road projects now include sidepaths (8- to 10- foot sidewalks) to accommodate bicycle and pedestri- ans and desinged with enhanced crossings at major intersections. Where right-way widths and topography allow pedestrian bridges and overpasses allow for easy crossing of major roadways such as I-80 and Hwy 965. Iowa City has expanded its on-street facilities with buffered bike lane- sand turning boxes. Roundabouts To date, Coralville has constructed twelve roundabouts and anticipates a future roundabout at 1st Avenue and Oakdale Boulevard. Both Iowa City and North Liberty have constructed five roundabouts. Roundabouts are increasingly viewed as a safer and more efficient alternative to traditional intersection traffic control such as stop signs or traffic signals. Roundabouts have been proven to reduce collision fatalities by 90 percent and injury collisions by 75 percent at in- tersections (FHWA & Institute for Highway Safety) while reducing the amount of delay that vehicle drivers experience as it is not required to come to a complete stop unless a conflicting vehicle is present. Examples of capital infrastructure projects funded in-part through MPoJC (FY2018-2021) • Reconstruction of 1st Ave. between 6th St. and 9th St. – Coralville • Reconstruction of Ranshaw Way from Zeller St. to Penn St. – North Liberty • Penn St. reconstruction from Cameron Way to Jones Blvd. – North Liberty • Roberts Ferry Rd. reconstruction – Tiffin • Reconstruction of Melrose Ave. (Sunset St. to E City Limits) – University Heights • Prentiss Street Bridge replacement over Ralston Creek – Iowa City • American Legion Rd. reconstruction – Iowa City • IWV Rd. reconstruction – Iowa City • Burlington St. reconstruction, between Riverside Dr. and Madison St. (ped/bike facilities)– Iowa City • Benton St. reconstruction – Iowa City Vehicle Miles Travelled Decreased in 2019 As the metro population increases, VMT is also expected to increase but that was not the case in 2019. Metro Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) increased between 2016 and 2018 with a substantial increase between 2016 and 2017 (49,602 miles travelled). In 2019, VMT decreased from 705,937 to 702,664, which is the first decrease in VMT since 2016 when VMT decreased by 9,968 as compared to 2015. While the decrease is marginal, it may be a result of multiple factors such as people utilizing alternative modes of transportation (transit, walking, and bicycling) or there being more direct routes between origins and destinations. Coordination of Traffic Signals The following metro arterial corridors received refreshed timings/cordination plans based on current traffic patterns.: • 2nd Street – Coralville • Dubuque Street – Iowa City • Highway 1/ Highway 6 – Iowa City • Dodge Street – Iowa City • Riverside Drive – Iowa City • 1st Avenue - Coralville This is an ongoing effort to reduce vehicular travel time and delays, especially during peak periods. Pedestrian overpasses and underpasses like this one that allows the sidepath on Oakdale Blvd. pass under Coral Ridge Avenue help to make busy corridors more accessible to bicyclists and pedestrians. Roundabouts, like this one in Coralville, improve safety, promote lower speeds, reduce conflict points, and lead to improved operational performace. 86 87RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Road and Bridge Infrastructure Challenges Aging Infrastructure As the metropolitan area continues to grow, the transportation network must be con- tinuously maintained and modernized. The emphasis on expansion of the road network during the last half of the twentieth century overlooked the necessary to replace and rehabilitate aging facilities and equipment. As population increases in the metropolitan area, there is a higher demand placed on the roadway network, especially in outlying areas. The challenge is to provide adequate capacity to provide a reasonable Level of Service for vehicular traffic while also keeping the system in a state of good repair. Bridges in the metropolitan area continue to age with 61% of bridges being built prior to 1980. As bridges continue to age, they became a detriment to the greater transporta- tion system causing delays and safety issues. Identifying funding to maintain the metro area bridges in acceptable condition is an ongoing challenge. Safety Improving the safety of our transportation network is priority. Overall metro colli- sions increased in the last five years (2016-2020) as compared to the 5 prior years, though fatalities and serious injuries have decreased (156 between 2016-2020 and 181 between 2011-2015). The rate at which fatalities and serious injuries occur per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (HMVMT), has fluctuated between 4.1 at the lowest (2013) and 6.2 at the highest (2012). As compared to the State, the rate of fatalities and serious injuries per HMVMT has been lower on average (comparing 2011-2017). In the Iowa City Urbanized Area, approximately 56% of collisions occurring between 2015 and 2019 involved a driver younger than 24. Comparatively, approximately 16% of collisions occurring during the same time frame involved a driver over 65 years of age. This accounts for 72% of all collisions. However, these two demographics have drastically different driving behaviors and transportation safety needs. Climate Change Climate change should be considered from two different perspectives relating to transpor- tation – how climate change affects the transportation network and how transportation con- tributes to climate change. How Climate Change Affects the Transportation Network Climate change poses an immediate and long-term threat in terms of increased extreme weather events that affect the reliability and capacity of the local transportation network. Cli- mate change is likely to damage transportation infrastructure through higher temperatures and more severe storms and flooding, affecting the reliability and capacity of the transporta- tion system while also increasing the cost. [EPA Link Below]. The metropolitan area has been significantly affected by flooding of the Iowa River and its tributaries in recent years, including a major flood in 2008 and several smaller flood events in years following. Flooding results in road closures, damage to infrastructure, disruption of traffic patterns, and an increase in travel times and VMT. The expectation is that the area will continue to experience both small and large scale flooding events. How Transportation Contributes to Climate Change Besides being affected by climate change, transportation systems also contribute to changes in the climate through emissions. Burning fossil fuels such as gas and diesel, release carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. This build-up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases cause the earth’s atmosphere to warm and subsequently impact the climate. Transportation activities are the largest source of emissions, accounting for 29 percent of to- tal U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2019. From 1990 to 2019, transportation CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion rose by 24 percent due in large part to increased demand for travel. [Inventory of US Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2019 – Data Highlights] EPA Link: https://19january2017snapshot.epa.gov/climate-impacts/climate-impacts-trans- portation_.html The Gilbert Street bridge over Ralston Creek south of Burlington Street is one of ofmore than 4,500 iowa bridges that are identified as strcuturally deficient. The Gilbert Street bridge bridge is sched- uled for replacement in 2022. 0 2 4 6 8 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 Rate per 100 million VMTSerious injury and Fatality Rates per HMVMT Iowa City Metro State of Iowa Metro communities have invested in flood protec- tion and mitigation. to read more about these effort, visit Iowa CityClimate Action Plan https://www.icgov. org/city-government/departments-and-divisions/cli- mate-action-outreach; Coralville Food Resilience Plan https://www.floodresilientcoralville.com/ 88 89RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Fuel Costs and Revenues The cost of fuel directly affects many facets of the transportation industry. For exam- ple, when the cost of fuel fluctuates noticeably, driving behavior changes and creates an immediate impact on the transportation system through variations in number of miles driven and changes in mode of travel. As mentioned in the Passenger Trans- portation chapter, the level of transit ridership in the metro has historically been cor- related with the cost of gasoline. Annual ridership increased to more than 7 million trips per year during the 2008 recession as gas prices rose to over $3 per gallon. Such changes in behavior can also have more far-reaching impacts, as notable in- creases or decreases in travel can affect transportation-related revenues such as those derived from fuel taxes. Iowa fuel taxes make up approximately 45% of the state Road Use Tax Fund (RUTF). Fuel tax revenues are declining due to increaces in fuel efficiency and the growth in the electric vehicle market. In December 2018, the Iowa DOT provided a report1 to the state legislature on the potential impacts to the RUTF. DOT estimates predicted a decrease in tax revenue of $7 million to $45 million by the year 2040. The DOT has proposed a number of strategies to mitigate the loss of fuel tax revenue, including surcharges on the purchase and/or increased registration fees for electric or plug-in hyybrid vehciles. These fees and taxes would be structured to recoup comparable charges to what vehicle owners/users would otherwise pay in fuel tax. Iowa Departmenet of Transportation. 2018 Report on the Impact of Elevtric Vehicles to the State Road Use Tax Fund. http://publications.iowa.gov/29142/1/EV%20RUTF%20Impact%20Report%20123118.pdf Opportunities electric Vehicles, Alternative Fuels, other emerging Technologies Eastern Iowa Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan Electric vehicle (EV) technology and deployment have advanced dramatically in recent years, creating opportunities to directly reduce emissions from the transportation sector while providing additional economic and energy security benefits. Recognizing the role that local and regional governments can take in enabling an electrified trans- portation future, an increasing number of communities across the United States are defining strategies to achieve a greater level of readiness for EVs, with a focus on charging infrastructure to support these vehicles. The Eastern Iowa Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan (EVRP) is a collective effort of cities, counties, and metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) of East- ern Iowa. Its goal is to increase zero-emission vehicles as one of the available solutions to while meeting the mobility needs of the region and donig so eq- uitably. Representatives from Cedar Falls, Cedar Rapids, Davenport, Dubuque, and Iowa City (including MPOJC) served on the steering committee that worked with ICF Consultants of Cambridge, Massachusetts to complete the plan. The plan establishes: • Strategies for increasing and leveraging local and regional investment in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure, with a focus on equity. • Best practices for education, outreach, and addressing barriers to elec- tric vehicles adoption. • Actions, policies, and programs that municipalities can enact at the local level. • Regional coordination strategies. Eastern Iowa Electric Vehicle Readiness Plan: http://www.inrcog.org/pdf/Eastern_Iowa_EVRP_fi- nal_June_2021.pdf Alternative fuels More than a dozen alternative fuels are in production or under development for use in alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Government and private-sector vehicle fleets are the primary users for most of these fuels, but individual consumers are increasingly interested in them. Using alternative fuels and advanced vehicles instead of conventional fuels and vehicles helps the United States conserve fuel and lower vehicle emissions. In Iowa, there are 932 fueling stations that offer alternative fuels. https://afdc.energy.gov/fuels/ [US Department of Energy; Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy] The MPO assists with regional coordination for EV and au- tonomous vehicle, and other advanced transportation tech- nologies. MPO staff serve on regional and state committees to ensure the successful adoption of these technologies. Based on information from Plugshare, December 30, 2021. https://www. plugshare.com/directory/us/iowa/iowa-city Summary of Key EV Readiness Strategies and Actions Key Readines Strategies Priority Actions invest in eV charging infrastructure Quantify the need for new public charging equipment to fill gaps at both local and regional level, including direct current (DC) fast chargers to enable long-distance travel along corridors. expand access to eV charging infrastructure Amend local zoning/land use codes to require EV charging as permitted accessory use, and to include requirements or incentives (e.g., density bonuses) for the installation of charging infrastructure in new construction and major renovations. Adoption of and access to eVs Coordinate with dealers to facilitate point-of-sale rebates for EVs. increase education and awareness of EVs and EV charging Develop and maintain a comprehensive EV resources website to educate all Eastern Iowa consumers on the environmental, financial, and other benefits of EVs. The website whould include information on logistics of buying EVs (including available incentives), installing charging (including local permitting process), locating charging, etc. Link to other reputable and well-maintained resources as appropriate. Coordinate regionally to implement actions and strategies Integrate EV readiness into regional planning efforts, including regional transportation plans and sustainable community strategies Lead by example Educate municipal/county employees about EVs and EV charging and encourage EV adoption through the development of workplace charging programs. Locations of eV Charging Stations 90 91RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Emerging Technologies Autonomous and connected vehicles are still emerging technologies with their own challenges and opportunities related to vehicle safety and efficiency. According to their Iowa in Motion Plan, the Iowa DOT plans to develop an implementation-ready platform for connecting and guiding automated vehicles. This platform will be based on high-definition dynamic mapping, predictive travel modeling, and a cloud-based communication network. The effort will initially deploy tech- nologies supporting autonomous vehiclesin the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids area. Additional deploy- ments are planned for the Des Moines-Ames metropolitan areas, as well as I-35 and I-80 across Iowa. MPOJC will be a part of these conversations and planning processes as they relate to the corridors in the Iowa City metropolitan area. Connected Vehicles (CV) Intelligent transportation systems that use cooperative dedicated, short-range spectrum (also known as vehicle-to-everything or V2X communications) provide the potential to prevent a sig- nificant number of crashes and enhance the safety of our nation’s transportation system. When integrated into a vehicle (cars, buses, trucks, bicycles, motorcycles, wheelchairs, etc.) or into in- frastructure, this V2X communication capability offers a powerful 360-degree sensor of threats and hazards along our roadways. [https://www.transportation.gov/research-and-technology/how-connected-vehicles-work] Automated Vehicles (AV) Automated vehicle (AV) technologies have the potential to significantly re- shape the transportation landscape. AVs use a combination of light detection and ranging (LIDAR), global positioning systems (GPS), optical cameras, and processing power to analyze the roadway and make decisions for the driver. Fully autonomous cars and trucks will integrate onto U.S. roadways by pro- gressing through six levels of driver assistance technology advancements in the coming years (see image to the right). Iowa has taken a leadership role in assisting with the study of AV technologies. In 2016, the Iowa DOT agreed to transform the heavily used I-380 corridor, between the Cedar Rapids and Iowa City metro areas, into a test site for AV technologies The National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) at the University of Iowa, with the help of key partners in the public and private sector, is researching how partially automated vehicles can provide transportation options for peo- ple who may not be able to drive themselves, such as the elderly or those with mobility or visual impairments. A partially automated vehicle will be travelling along a set route through Hills, Riverside, Kalona, and Iowa City. Potential benefits of automation include: • Safety – Removing human error from the crash equation; • Economic and societal – Reducing or eliminating vehicle crashes, thus reduceing the associated financial costs ; • Efficiency and convenience – Smoothing traffic flow and reduced conges- tion, which in turn reduces the time people spend commuting; • Mobility – Expanding mobility options for people with disabilities. The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Connected Vehicle program is work- ing with state and local transportation agencies, vehicle and device makers, and the public to test and evaluate technol- ogy that will enable cars, buses, trucks, trains, roads and other infrastructure, and our smartphones and other devices to “talk” to one another. Connected ve- hicles have the potential to significantly reduce the number of fatalities and seri- ous injuries caused by accidents on our roads and highways. US Department of Transportation, Intelligent Transportation Systems Joint Program Office. https://www.its. dot.gov/cv_basics/cv_basics_what.htm Source: Iowa DOT. 2019-2023 Iowa Strtegic Highway Safety Plan. https://iowadot.gov/traffic/ pdfs/IowaSHSP.pdf 92 93RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe CoViD-19 impact Traffic Trends The onset of COVID-19 impacted travel patterns and mode choice in the Iowa City Urbanized Area beginning in March 2020 through May 2021 when traffic patterns began to nor- malize. The Iowa Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT) recorded traffic counts at their more than 120 automatic traffic recorders (ATRs) across the state and the data showed fewer cars travelling on all types of roads. Between March 2020 and August 2021, Iowa City municipal street and prima- ry roads saw an average decrease in traffic of 15% as com- pared to a 12% decrease on all State muncipal street and primary roads. In May 2021, traffic volumes on Iowa City mu- nicipal street and primary roads began to normalize or reach levels pre-COVID-19, with traffic volumes being 3% lower than the same month in 2019. CRRSAA: The passage and signining (December 2020) of the Coronavirus Response and Relief Supplemental Appropria- tions Act of 2021 (CRRSAA) provided $121.9 million of federal highway COVID-19 refief to Iowa. The funding was allocated to all cities an counties in Iowa using the Road Use Tax Fund formula (DOT: 47.5%, County 32.5% and City 20%) Allocation Trails $5.0 million Highway DOT $55.5 million County Secondary Road Fund $28.6 million Farm-to-Market Fund $9.4 million City Street Fund $23.4 million Total $121.9 million Iowa City $646,272 Coralville $180,057 North Liberty $174,267 Tiffin $18,541 University Heights $10,009 -40% -35% -30% -25% -20% -15% -10% -5% 0% 5% Monthly Average Daily Traffic Hwy 6 in Iowa City vs State Average (% below 2019) Iowa City (MUNICIPAL PRIMARY)EconomyEnvironmentQuality of LifeSystem PreservationEfficiencyChoiceSafety HealthEquityG U I D I N G P R I N C I P L E S M E T G U I D I N G P R I N C I P L E S M E T  Use Pavement Condition Index (PCI) to help direct investments to areas of greatest need.  Support policies and programs that improve pedestrian and bicycle safety and access.   Consider the installation of roundabouts as an alternative to traditional traffic control. Promote policies and projects that encourage alternatives to single-occupancy vehicle travel.  Evaluate potential impacts of extreme weather and other climate-related stressors. Support projects that address risks due to flooding or other natural hazards. Develop detour routing plans based on travel demand analysis. Support projects that reduce metropolitan area Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT). Encourage use of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to reduce congestion. Include analysis of fuel consumption within capacity and Level of Service analysis. Reduce traffic congestion and fuel consumption Provide a transporation system that is resilient to natural hazards Distribute bi-annual metro collision and countermeasures report. Raise awareness of the dangers of distracted driving and walking. Consider bicycle and pedestrian Level of Service (LOS) along with vehicular LOS in traffic studies. Utilize multi-disciplinary safety teams to identify improvements in the right-of-way. Preserve and maintain existing transportation infrastructure Prioritize implementation of Complete Streets policy Identify and report on transportation safety issues Approach every transportation project as an opportunity to improve transportation for all users. Consider reallocating extra space in right-of-way for use by other modes. Provide educational and planning assistance to local governments to fully realize Complete Streets principles. Ensure investments are adequate for improving bridge and pavement conditions. Consider revising grant funding criteria to prioritize system preservation. Ensure all projects meet minimum Complete Streets standards. STRATEGIES: IMPROVING THE ROAD AND BRIDGE NETWORK Iowa City’s observed traffic volumes throughout the pandemic closely matched the statewid trend for similar roadways/types. 94 95RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Project Selection To determine what projects to include in the MPOJC 2050 Long Range Transportation Plan, MPO Staff asked entities to submit capital transportation infrastructure needs (projects) for the years 2022-2050 to be considered for inclusion in the Plan. Communities were asked to include any projects for which they anticipate potential use of federal funds. Communities did not include highway or interstate projects in their jurisdiction (which the Iowa DOT would typically fund), proj- ects that would be developer driven and funded, or projects expected to be exclusively locally funded. Upon receiving each community’s list of priority projects, staff completed a preliminarily screen of the projects to determine if they were eligible for inclusion using the following criteria: • Is the project eligible to receive Federal funds such as Surface Transportation Block Grant (STBG), Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP), and/or Federal Transit Administration funding? • Does the project comply with the adopted MPOJC Complete Streets Policy? • Is the project located within the adopted MPOJC Planning Boundary? • Is the community committed to providing necessary matching funds for the project? Once all projects were screened, staff hosted a series of public input opportunities where the public was invited to comment on the projects submitted. Opportunities included virtual meet- ings and an online interactive map detailing each project with the opportunity for the public to comment. The projects were subsequently scored by staff using the Urbanized Area Policy Board approved scoring criteria [reference or include here]. The scores and public input were then provided to the Transportation Technical Advisory Committee (TTAC) and Urbanized Area Policy Board who were responsible for ensuring the final project list was fiscally constrained using the MPO’s forecasted federal transportation infrastructure budget for years 2022-2050. The final fiscally constrained project list is available starting on page x. FiSCALLY CoNSTRAiNeD RoAD AND BRiDGe PRoJeCTS Capital infrastructure projects that did not make the fiscally-constrained approved list of projects (due to a lack of forecasted funding) are includ- ed in the Supporting Documents section of this plan. Projects descriptions and cost estimates for 2022-2030 road and bridge projects are provided on the following pages. Fiscal constraint is a required component of long-range planning. This plan includes only those projects that can be realistically completed based on anticipated revenues. The Urbanized Area Policy Board has ap- proved the inclusion of the following capital infrastructure projects in the fiscally-con- strained list of projects eligible to receive federal funding through the MPOJC. For more information on the process by which these projects were selected for inclusion in the LRTP, please refer to the Financial Planning chapter on page 53. 2022-2030 96 97RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe Projects 1-7, highlighted in blue are committed projects and have funding programmed in the FY22-25 MPOJC Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 University Heights Melrose Ave Complete Street improvements Streetscape, stormwater and intersection improvements, utility relocations and construct bike lanes east of Sunset St (0.35 miles)$1,560,000 2 Coralville 5th St Reconstruction - 12th Ave to 20th Ave 0.6 mile reconstruction of 5th St between 12th Ave and 20th Ave $3,132,000 3 Tiffin Park Rd (Hwy 6 to oakdale Blvd)Grade & pave to a four-lane street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $4,860,000 4 Iowa City Taft Ave Reconstruction American Legion Rd to Lower West Branch Rd $12,760,000 5 Coralville Highway 6 & Deer Creek Rd Pavement widening, turn lanes, RRXing improvements, new traffic signals $3,712,000 6 North Liberty Ranshaw Way improvements - Phase 6 Full build out from Hawkeye Dr to Forevergreen Rd, including trails and landscaping $11,600,000 7 University Heights Sunset St Pavement Pavement repair and pedestrian improvements $557,960 8 University Heights Melrose Ave Preventative Maintenance Pavement repair within city limits $174,000 9 Coralville 5th St & 10th Ave Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout and reconstruct 10th Ave to Highway 6 $1,450,000 10 Iowa City Park Rd Reconstruction Reconstruct Park Rd between Riverside Dr and Templin Rd $7,772,000 11 Coralville 1st Ave North Phase 1 0.5 mile reconstruction of 1st Ave between southerly E. Grantview Dr and Auburn East Ln from rural to urban cross section $1,537,000 12 Coralville 12th Ave at i-80 overpass Reconstruct road approach sections to bridge over I-80, extend shared use path from south end of bridge to 11th St, construct shared use path north of bridge to Ozark Ridge share use path $754,000 13 Iowa City Benton St Bridge This project is a replacement of the Benton St bridge over Ralston Creek $1,624,000 14 Tiffin Hwy 6 (Main St to Park Rd)Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails and install center turn lane $3,190,000 15 Coralville Heartland Dr - Commerce Dr to Jones Blvd 0.42 mile reconstruction of Heartland Dr from Commerce Dr to Jones Blvd $1,740,000 16 North Liberty Dubuque St Reconstruction - Phase 5 Full reconstruction with curb and gutter from Penn St to Main St $657,720 17 North Liberty Forevergreen Rd/Jasper Ave Roundabout Full build out, including trails and landscaping $4,194,560 18 Coralville Commerce Dr - Coral Ridge Ave to Commercial Pk 0.25 mile reconstruction Commerce Dr from Coral Ridge Ave to Commercial Park $1,044,000 19 University Heights Sunset St Preventative Maintenance and Crosswalk improvements Pavement repair between Benton St and Melrose Ave, and Oakcrest Ave crosswalk visibility improvements $174,000 20 North Liberty Dubuque St Reconstruction - Phase 4 Full reconstruction with curb and gutter from Juniper St to North Liberty Rd $861,880 21 Coralville 1st Ave - Auburn Hills Dr to Auburn east Ln Roundabout Reconstruction of intersection into a roundabout with pedestrian facilities $1,450,000 22 North Liberty Dubuque St Reconstruction - Phase 2 Full reconstruction with curb and gutter from Zeller St to Juniper St $2,494,000 23 North Liberty Dubuque St Reconstruction - Phase 3 Full reconstruction with curb and gutter from Cherry Street to Zeller Street.$3,087,920 24 Tiffin Hwy 6 (Park Rd to i-380)Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $1,160,000 25 Coralville Heartland Dr - Commercial Park to Commerce Dr 0.23 mile reconstruction of Heartland Dr from Commercial Park to Commerce Dr $812,000 Fiscally Constrained Road & Bridge Projects 2022-2030 26 Coralville 1st Ave & Oakdale Blvd Roundabout Reconstruction of intersection as a roundabout with pedestrian facilities $2,320,000 27 Coralville oakdale Blvd extension 0.6 mile extension of Oakdale Blvd west of Jones Blvd $2,465,000 28 Coralville 12th Ave & Oakdale Blvd Intersection Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout $1,160,000 29 Tiffin Park Rd (Hwy 6 south to i-80) Phase one Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $5,800,000 30 Coralville Highway 6 & new Heartland Dr Intersection Extension of Heartland Dr to new intersection with Hwy 6. Turn lanes and traffic signal improvements $1,740,000 Total Costs 2022-2030 $85,844,040 estimated State and Federal Funding $93,240,028 Remaining $7,395,988 iD e ntity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction . . . 2022-2030 projects continued from previous page iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 DOT/ Iowa City Dodge St Reconstruction Reconstruct Dodge St between Governor St and Burlington St $19,040,000 2 DOT/Coralville Reconfigure I-80/ 1st Ave Interchange Upgrade to diverging diamond interchange $30,420,768 3 DOT/ North Liberty Replace Penn St Bridge over i-380 Replace Penn Street bridge over I-380; including a trail on the south side of the bridge (separated by barrier rail), a sidewalk on the north side of the bridge (separated by barrier rail) and right turn lane onto Kansas Ave $17,400,000 Total Costs 2022-2030 $66,860,768 estimated State and Federal Funding $95,418,942 Remaining $28,558,174 Fiscally Constrained iowa DoT Projects 2022-2030 98 99RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe FiSCALLY CoNSTRAiNeD RoAD AND BRiDGe PRoJeCTS Projects descriptions and cost estimates for 2031-2040 road and bridge projects are provided on the following pages. 2031-2040 iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 Iowa City Burlington St Bridge - South This project is a replacement of the Burlington St bridge over the Iowa River that will also increase the number of lanes $36,966,400 2 Iowa City Hwy 1/ 6 intersection Reconstruction Reconstruction of the Hwy 1/ 6/ Riverside Dr intersection $8,360,000 3 Iowa City Gilbert St/ US 6 Intersection Left Turn Lanes Reconstruct the intersection to include dual left turn lanes on Gilbert St $7,356,800 4 Iowa City South Gilbert St improvements Reconstruction from Benton St to Stevens Dr. This project does not include improvements to the Gilbert St. US 6 intersection $9,994,790 5 Coralville 1st Ave & 1st St Intersection Traffic signals and pedestrian facilities $1,140,000 6 Coralville Hwy 6 & relocated 2nd Ave Intersection Traffic signals and pedestrian facilities $1,140,000 7 Iowa City Sycamore St - East/ West Leg from "L" to South Gilbert St This project will reconstruct Sycamore St to arterial standards using the Complete Streets Policy. This phase will be the east/ west leg of Sycamore St $7,023,616 8 Coralville Hwy 6 & Lucas Ave Intersection Traffic signals, pedestrian facilities extending west on Hwy 6 $760,000 9 Tiffin ireland Ave (Village Dr south to Frontage Rd south of I-80)Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails and install center turn lane $4,180,000 10 Coralville Forevergreen Rd & Ridgeway Dr Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout $1,900,000 11 Coralville 1st Ave North Phase 3 0.6 mile reconstruction of 1st Ave between Rustic Ridge Rd and future Forevergreen Rd from a rural to urban cross section $2,128,000 12 Coralville 1st Ave North Phase 4 0.6 mile reconstruction of 1st Ave between Forevergreen Rd and Dubuque St $2,128,000 13 Coralville Forevergreen Rd & Front St Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout $1,900,000 14 University Heights Melrose Ave Preventative Maintenance Pavement repair within city limits $281,200 15 Iowa City Linn St Reconstruction - Burlington St to iowa Ave Part of the Downtown Streetscape Master Plan, this project reconstructs Linn St from Burlington St to Iowa Ave. Project also improves sidewalk pavement, addresses critical update to water main, and replaces and relocates storm sewer between Washington St and Iowa Ave $4,470,624 16 Coralville 1st Ave North Phase 2 0.5 mile reconstruction of 1st Ave (and North Liberty Rd) between Auburn East Ln and Rustic Ridge Rd NE $2,014,000 17 Coralville 1st Ave & Rustic Ridge Rd Roundabout Reconstruction of intersection into a roundabout with pedestrian facilities $1,520,000 18 Coralville 12th Ave & 10th St Intersection Turn lanes and traffic signals, or roundabout $1,520,000 19 Coralville oakdale Blvd Median and Turn Lane improvements 0.32 mile of raised medians and turn lane improvement from Crosspark Rd to University Pkwy; creates ped refuge for North Ridge Trail crossing Oakdale Blvd.$760,000 20 Tiffin Hwy 6 (Roberts Ferry Rd to West City Limits Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails and install center turn lane $5,320,000 21 Coralville Hwy 6/ Westcor Dr/ kansas Ave intersection Traffic signals, north leg addition, pedestrian facilities $760,000 22 Coralville Heartland Dr & Commerce Dr Intersection Conversion to mini-roundabout, roundabout or traffic signals $912,000 23 Coralville Oakdale Blvd & Brown Deer Rd Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout $1,900,000 24 Coralville 1st Ave and Russell Slade Blvd Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout $2,280,000 25 Coralville 10th St Reconstruction #1 0.42 mile reconstruction of 10th St from 12th Ave to 20th Ave $2,280,000 Fiscally Constrained Road & Bridge Projects 2031-2040 100 101RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe 26 Coralville 10th St Reconstruction #2 0.24 mile reconstruction of 10th St from 20th Ave to 22nd Ave $1,140,000 27 University Heights Sunset St Preventative Maintenance Pavement repair between Benton St and Melrose Ave $281,200 28 Coralville Oakdale Blvd & Crosspark Rd Roundabout Reconstruct intersection as a roundabout with pedestrian facilities added across Oakdale Blvd $2,280,000 29 Coralville Oakdale Blvd & University Pkwy Intersection Roundabout or traffic signal improvements $1,140,000 30 Coralville Hwy 6 & Jones Blvd Intersection Pedestrian facilities to connect Jones Blvd shared use path to Clear Creek Trl $608,000 31 Coralville Forevergreen Rd e xtension .52 mile extension of Forevergreen Rd from Naples Ave NE to North Liberty Rd NE $4,560,000 32 Tiffin Roberts Ferry Rd Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails from Ridgeway Dr north to City limits $6,840,000 33 North Liberty Forevergreen Rd e xtension Extension of Forevergreen Rd from 12th Avenue to Naples Ave NE $4,560,000 34 Tiffin Park Rd (1-80 to City Limits - includes kansas Ave) Phase Two Grade & pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $4,560,000 35 Iowa City iowa Ave Culvert Repair This project will repair a box culvert that carriers Ralston Creek under Iowa Ave $804,019 36 Coralville Deer Creek Rd Bridge over Clear Creek Bridge replacement $1,368,000 37 Coralville 12th Ave and Holiday Rd Roundabout and bridge over CRANDiC Full reconstruction at 12th Ave and Holiday Rd with replacement of bridge over CRANDIC Railroad to provide necessary offset of roundabout east of 12th Ave.$7,600,000 Total Costs 2031-2040 $144,736,650 estimated State and Federal Funding $144,933,960 Remaining $197,310 iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction iD e ntity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 DOT i-80 6 Lane Project (east)Six lane I-80 from east of Iowa Hwy 1 to eastern MPO boundary $28,211,200 2 DOT i-380 6 Lane Project (North)Six lane I-380 from north of Forevergreen Rd to the north MPO boundary $64,774,800 Total Costs 2031-2040 $92,986,000 estimated State and Federal Funding $169,310,253 Remaining $76,324,253 Fiscally Constrained iowa D oT Projects 2031-2040 Projects descriptions and cost estimates for 2041-2050 road and bridge projects are provided on the following page. FiSCALLY CoNSTRAiNeD RoAD AND BRiDGe PRoJeCTS 2041-2050 102 103RoAD AND BRiDGe RoAD AND BRiDGe iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 University Heights Melrose Ave West improvements Streetscape and stormwater improvements, utility relocations and construct bike lanes west of Sunset St (0.2 miles)$2,304,000 2 Coralville 5th St Reconstruction - 10th Ave to 12th Ave 0.15 mile reconstruction of 5th St from 10th Ave to 12th Ave $768,000 3 University Heights Sunset St improvements Streetscape and stormwater improvements, utility relocations and construct bike lanes south of Melrose Ave (0.35 miles)$1,651,200 4 University Heights Melrose Ave Preventative Maintenance Pavement repair within city limits $451,200 5 Coralville 22nd Ave Reconstruction 0.45 mile reconstruction of 22nd Avenue between Hwy 6 and 10th St $3,840,000 6 Coralville 10th St Reconstruction #3 0.5 mile reconstruction of 10th St from 22nd Ave to 25th Ave $3,168,000 7 Coralville oakdale Blvd Reconstruction 1 mile reconstruction of Oakdale Blvd from 12th Ave to Crosspark Rd $7,680,000 8 Iowa City Gilbert St iA iS underpass This project relocates the sidewalks of the Gilbert St underpass at the IAIS Railroad. The sidewalks are moved further from the street and existing erosion problems are addressed $1,205,453 9 Coralville 12th Ave Reconstruction #1 0.5 mile reconstruction of 12th Avenue between 8th Street and I-80 $4,032,000 10 Coralville 12th Ave Reconstruction #2 0.4 mile reconstruction of 12th Ave between I-80 and Holiday Rd $3,840,000 11 Coralville Holiday Rd Reconstruction #1 0.4 mile reconstruction of Holiday Rd between 1st Ave and Brown Deer Rd $3,840,000 12 Coralville Holiday Rd Reconstruction #3 0.4 mile reconstruction of Holiday Rd from12th Ave to South Ridge Dr $3,840,000 13 University Heights Sunset St Preventative Maintenance Pavement repair between Benton St and Melrose Ave $451,200 14 Iowa City Rohret Rd - Lake Shore Dr to City Limits This project will reconstruct Rohret Rd to urban standards $6,683,443 15 Coralville Hwy 6 & new 17th Ave Intersection Extension of 17th Ave to Hwy 6 with new turn lanes and traffic signals $1,440,000 16 Tiffin 340th St (kansas Ave to ivy Ave)Grade and pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $7,680,000 17 Tiffin Half Moon Ave (Hwy 6 north to approximately .5 mile north)Grade and pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $7,680,000 18 Coralville Holiday Rd Reconstruction #2 0.42 mile reconstruction of Holiday Rd between Brown Deer Rd and 12th Ave $4,032,000 19 Coralville Rustic Ridge Rd Reconstruction 0.33 mile reconstruction of Rustic Ridge Rd from North Liberty Rd to Dubuque St $2,304,000 20 Coralville Camp Cardinal Blvd Reconstruction 0.35 mile reconstruction of Camp Cardinal Blvd from Clear Creek to Hwy 6 $2,880,000 21 Iowa City oakdale Blvd - Hwy 1 to Prairie Du Chien Rd This project would construct Oakdale Blvd from Hwy 1, west to Prairie Du Chien Rd $30,375,936 22 Iowa City oakdale Blvd - Hwy 1 to Scott Blvd This project would construct an extension north across I-80 to a new intersection with Iowa Hwy 1 $55,296,000 23 Tiffin Village Dr (Ireland Ave to Half Moon Ave)Grade and pave street, install curb, gutter and sidewalks or trails $13,440,000 24 Iowa City Traffic Signal Pre-Emption System This project will install a city-wide Geographic Information System (GIS) based traffic signal pre-emption system for emergency vehicles.$4,501,094 Total Costs 2041-2050 $173,383,526 estimated State and Federal Funding $173,459,431 Remaining $75,905 Fiscally Constrained Road & Bridge Projects 2041-2050 iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 DOT i-80 6 Lane Project (West)Six lane 1-80 from 80/380 west to the western MPO boundary $170,496,000 Total Costs 2041-2050 $170,496,000 estimated State and Federal Funding $253,635,314 Remaining $83,139,314 iD entity Project Title Project Description $ Cost estimate at Construction 1 Iowa City Benton St - orchard St to oaknoll Dr This is a capacity related improvement identified by the Arterial Street Plan $15,029,760 2 Iowa City South Arterial and Bridge - uS 218 to Gilbert St Construction of a south arterial street and bridge over the Iowa River, connecting from Old Hwy 218/ US 218 interchange to the west side of the Iowa River to Gilbert St/ Sycamore "L" intersection $58,934,477 Total Costs 2041-2050 $73,964,237 Illustrative Road & Bridge Projects 2041-2050 Fiscally Constrained iowa D oT Projects 2041-2050